#1
are private lessons worth it?

i want to learn theory, improv, jazz, and of course develop a better ear for music. i tried learning it on my own, but idk, it seems impossible without someone to actually guide me.

ive been playing for about a year and a half w/o lessons, and know little theory
My Rig:
Yamaha RBX 375 bass
Peavey Millenium BXP bass (won at Summer Slaughter 2010, signed by all the bands)
Eden Nemesis NC410 320w combo amp
Check out Tyrannicide, my death/thrash metal band:
http://www.myspace.com/tyrannicidemetal
#2
If you find a good teacher then definitely. If you don't I think lessosn can really hold you back. Also make sure the teacher you find knows about the stuff you want to learn.
Founder of Jaco society

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Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#3
Find a good teacher and you will not believe how beneficial those sessions are. I waited six years to find that out - don't delay.
#4
There's nothing better then a teacher when it comes to learning. Not only do regular lessons give you good, quality practice time, but you have someone experienced to not only tell you what to do, but actually demonstrate for you in person, which helps immensely. I say go for the lessons
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Spector and Markbass
#5
hasn't hurt me.

gigging with a church style band, improvised basslines based off of chord cheat sheets makes you have to learn what you need, if you improvise something out of key, you have to know and learn.
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Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

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#6
I have had three teachers now, and I have to say I've learned something from every single one. My current jazz teacher is a monster on bass and guitar and if you want to learn jazz, a good teacher is going to accelerate the process immensely.

Along with teaching you the skills and techniques, a teacher is a great asset to critiquing your own playing as well and help you focus on areas you need to improve.
#7
There is no substitute for a good teacher. Books and instructional DVDs are great, but they can't answer your questions or tell you what you are doing correctly and what you are doing incorrectly. They also can't motivate you to press on through plateaus and overcome frustration with something that you find particularly challenging.

The most important thing is to find a teacher who is a bassist, rather than a guitarist who occasionally plays the bass. The bass is, like all instruments, unique and possesses its own idiosyncrasies. If your teacher can't or doesn't appreciate these things, then he or she can take you only so far. You will be missing out on a lot of very important things.
#8
thanks so much for the replies everybody. im hoping to get lessons very soon
My Rig:
Yamaha RBX 375 bass
Peavey Millenium BXP bass (won at Summer Slaughter 2010, signed by all the bands)
Eden Nemesis NC410 320w combo amp
Check out Tyrannicide, my death/thrash metal band:
http://www.myspace.com/tyrannicidemetal