#1
I'm about to buy this used Les Paul DeLuxe I found for 1500 bucks (probably a bit less), but I must admit, I had no idea of the existance of this Les Paul species.

I wiki'ed and found some info, but I'd like to know more about it.

The minihambuckers, what kind of sound do they produce? For what genres is it good at?

Flaws about it? Anything I should know?

I play hard rock, blues, jazz, classic rock, funk some metal.

I wouldn't mind routing the guitar for normal sized hambuckers, but I want to know what to expect beforehand.
#2
The mini 'buckers ought to be fine for all of that. As long as its not metalcore.
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#3
What ever you do do not rout the guitar you will ruin any value the guitar has. Mini humbuckers sound great anyway. Can you give us a little more info color, year and/or serial numbers.

John
#5
I Tried to find it in my books I have here but no luck. I lent my other books to a friend it's probably listed in one of those. I was hoping to give you a little more info on it. All the early 90s era LPs I have tried were hit or miss. Most were LP Standards and Customs not many Deluxe models but I got to try a few. I think I bought one or two but only to resell. $1500.00 IMO is a bit steep but I think Gibbys are over priced and try to get the lowest price now a days with the crappy economy people are very anxious to sell and you can take advantage of that if it's a privet sale.


John
#6
The Les Paul Deluxe started life as a Gold Top Les Paul from the 1950s that was routed for the single-coil P-90 pickups. With the advent of the Gibson humbucker and its widespread acceptance, Gibson didn't want to continue producing a Les Paul with P-90 single-coil pickups. Rather than send them back to be re-routed and then have the finish touched up, Gibson discovered that the smaller humbucker that it put in its Epiphone archtop jazz guitars would fit just fine in the P-90 cavity. A plastic P-90 pickup cover was cut into a pickup ring, placed over the smaller humbucker, and the Les Paul Deluxe was born. They came in a number of colors over the years, but the Gold Top was by far the most common.

The Deluxe was a perennial favorite with Les Paul himself. He loved them, and especially loved the fact that it sold for less than a Les Paul Standard, so more players could afford them. The smaller humbuckers are brighter sounding than the full-sized humbucker. Pete Townshend used a number of them with the Who; heavily modifying some of them. They are great guitars, and you should avoid the temptation to enlarge the pickup cavities to fit standard humbuckers. If you don't like the sound, any P-90 or P-90 sized replacement pickup will fit in there without a modification.
Last edited by FatalGear41 at Nov 1, 2009,
#7
Thanks to both! That's really helpful info. I'll keep you updated with clips or videos of the guitar if you like, I might just seal the deal this week!
#8
Great guitars. A couple of my friends own them. Robbo still swears by them, and he's been playing his since his Thin Lizzy days. They have a great bite to them.
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#9
Quote by FatalGear41
The Les Paul Deluxe started life as a Gold Top Les Paul from the 1950s that was routed for the single-coil P-90 pickups. With the advent of the Gibson humbucker and its widespread acceptance, Gibson didn't want to continue producing a Les Paul with P-90 single-coil pickups. Rather than send them back to be re-routed and then have the finish touched up, Gibson discovered that the smaller humbucker that it put in its Epiphone archtop jazz guitars would fit just fine in the P-90 cavity. A plastic P-90 pickup cover was cut into a pickup ring, placed over the smaller humbucker, and the Les Paul Deluxe was born. They came in a number of colors over the years, but the Gold Top was by far the most common.

The Deluxe was a perennial favorite with Les Paul himself. He loved them, and especially loved the fact that it sold for less than a Les Paul Standard, so more players could afford them. The smaller humbuckers are brighter sounding than the full-sized humbucker. Pete Townshend used a number of them with the Who; heavily modifying some of them. They are great guitars, and you should avoid the temptation to enlarge the pickup cavities to fit standard humbuckers. If you don't like the sound, any P-90 or P-90 sized replacement pickup will fit in there without a modification.

you've got your info a bit mixed up there.

iirc the les paul deluxe was introduced around 1968, as gibson, under norlin, began reissuing the les paul, and they brought out a reissue of the '56 goldtop model and a custom reissue, but then got swarmed with requests for a "standard" les paul (IE '58-'60 spec), and that's when they discovered that you could fit epiphone's mini-humbuckers into the P-90 routings by mounting them onto a P-90 casing, which was an economical way to deal with the requests for the time being since they were mass producing P-90 routed les paul bodies. The standard reissue later followed, but i guess the deluxe proved popular enough to remain in production alongside it.

I really have not heard of a les paul deluxe earlier than 1968, and seeing as how the humbuckers had been in production for about 3 years before the first les pauls were fitted with them (humbuckers introduced in '54 i think, les pauls first fitted with humbuckers in '57), and they weren't really "mass-produced" in those days, i very much doubt there is such a crossover in that era. on top of that i don't think epiphone were bought by gibson until 1957-58, and it would seem that les pauls already had full-size humbuckers by then.

I'd love to own a les paul deluxe, though. They can be fantastic guitars.
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#10
Not really. I didn't mean to imply that the Les Paul bodies with P-90s had been sitting in the factory since 1956. Rather, just that when the Les Paul was reissued, people were very attached to the humbucker and didn't want the old P-90s. You are quite correct that the Deluxe was introduced in 1969. It was in response to the failure of the 1968 reissues.

With respect to humbuckers, they'd been in production since about 1954, but not the Seth Lover-designed pickup. That was designed in 1956; Gibson applied for a U.S. patent on the design and began using the pickup in the early months of 1957.

The Les Paul Deluxe mini humbucker is indeed an Epiphone pickup. See Fifty Years of the Gibson Les Paul (pg. 56).

Thanks for the input.
#11
So would I fare better if I changed that pickup for, I dunno, a Seymour Duncan? I had a Epi Les Paul before, and I changed the pickups for DiMarzio bluesbuckers, because I felt the stock pickups were a bit dull.
Last edited by Fiberglass Gum at Nov 2, 2009,
#12
Try the stock pickups before you decide to change them. You might decide that you like them. A lot of people did back in the 1970s. If you are looking for something with more grit or overdrive, you could see what Duncan or Dimarzio offer as a replacement of that size. I'm sure you'd find something you like.