#1
someone who can play anything from funk,metal,blues,some jazz,and acoustic stylings with great proficiency.
#3
pretty much yeah
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#4
He was born in a coop, raised in a cage... children fear him, critics rage... he's half alive and he's half dead, the folks just call him buckethead!
#5
Quote by Ailiox
He was born in a coop, raised in a cage... children fear him, critics rage... he's half alive and he's half dead, the folks just call him buckethead!


I quote thee for emphasis.

And Vai? I dunno.

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#6
They are rare as solo artists or in high-profile bands...but a bit more common as studio musicians and hired guns. The labels will call them in to back solo artists or to fill in for guys who- for whatever reason- can't make recording sessions.

Zappa had a few pass through his band as well.

The most likely place you can see one (besides the internet) would be on TV playing in some show's live band. The guys who get the gigs on shows like Letterman, Leno, SNL and the like have to demonstrate proficiency with a wide variety of musical styles because its likely they're going to have to play with bands or artists covering a wide variety of musical styles.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

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Log off and play yer guitar!

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#7
Like stated, you've pretty much just described a studio guitarist. They have to be very talented at a lot of genre's if they want to get work. Some of them go on to get big and well known after that. I think Steve Lukather used to be a studio musician?
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#8
So was Kip Winger, before he tried to have a career as a recording artist. From what I understand, he was on a LOT of stuff that got released in the 1980s.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#9
Actually, another place to find these guys is in guitar magazines, especially in ads.

If you're looking at some ad and you have no idea who the guy is, and he has credits like (band s, band t, band u, and bands v w x y & z), odds are good he started off as a studio musician.

OTOH, some players just like a variety of styles. As I understand it, one of the guitarists who worked with Elton John on a lot of his early work and tours has also worked with Alice Cooper. Go figure.

Jennifer Batten, besides being an awesome solo shredder, worked with Jeff Beck, Carmine Appice's "Guitar Zeus" project (featuring Brian May), Michael Sembello, Carl Anderson, Cindy Cruz, Public Image bassist Bret Helm, Natalie Cole, Sara Hickman, Miguel Mateo and the debut of The Immigrants. Music video appearances include Jeff Beck, Michael Jackson, Natalie Cole and Sara Hickman and Miguel Mateos's "Obsesión".

She also worked three of Michael Jackson's tours as his primary guitarist. If you're unfamiliar with her, track her down. As she once said, Eddie Van Halen laid down the classic lead & solo for MJ's song, "Beat It," but she had to play it hundreds of times on tour, and do it well.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Nov 1, 2009,
#10
any player that has had professional tuition is normally able to adapt themselves to any genre, what tends to happen is they get pigeon holed into being a specialist in one genre because of what they have released in the past. it`s upto the player to showcase there talent and how they adapt to different genres.
Last edited by ibanezgod1973 at Nov 2, 2009,
#11
Quote by gregorious818
someone who can play anything from funk,metal,blues,some jazz,and acoustic stylings with great proficiency.


His name is John Lowery, aka John5.

Honestly, they are not rare at all. He was the first name that popped into my head though. They normally come in the form of studio guitarists (and he actually happens to be one).


Another, more famous one, that I can think of off the top of my head would be Chris Broderick.
#12
Or Steve Morse, of Dixie Dregs/Deep Purple/Kansas (and more) fame.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_morse
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#15
A lot of pros can turn their hands to many styles, as can a lot of famous players you wouldn't necessarily expect to be able to...you'll just never hear about it. They may only record one genre because that's what their band does or what's popular but that doesn't mean it's all they can play.
Actually called Mark!

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#16
There are plenty of great guitarists capable of play just about an genre , like stated many a studio musician etc.
Mark Knopfler , Chet Atkins ,Les Paul, Roy Clark , Eric Clapton are artist both past and present that could or can play anything if they chose to. The list could go on and on.
#17
Oh yeah, it's true too what was stated that you just don't hear about what certain guitarists can do. Like the one guy from Sum 41 would just play chordal stuff with that band, then they did this at an MTV special:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ_MSIIwa0U

More than meets the eye, mate.
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#18
These guitarists aren't rare, they just aren't as known to the public.
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#19
they are not rare :S most good guitar players can play loads or example dimebag was a skilled blues player and yet since he was in a metal band he didnt release it, just because its not on their albums dont mean they dont play it

EDIT: too many people in this thread seem to think just because someone plays a certain style like metal means the very second they see a really simple bit of blues music they panic and cant play it at all
Last edited by Tedis1111 at Nov 2, 2009,
#20
Quote by Ailiox
He was born in a coop, raised in a cage... children fear him, critics rage... he's half alive and he's half dead, the folks just call him buckethead!



hahahahahah


Also- never forget Marty Friedman!
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#21
Check out Johnny Hiland, very versatile studio guy in Nashville, and hes on Steve Vai's record label
#22
Where I live there are tons of them, a few of my friends (including myself) can play litrelly anything...at the moment I'm learning some classical finger picking mixed in with some Post Hardcore stuff (Y)
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#23
Why has everyone forgotten Satch, satriani can play any style and make it suit him
#25
Quote by St. Angry
youre right. i just checked the dvd i have agian and it is in D standard. i dont think Metallica has ever done a song in drop D, or drop C for that matter.

^Check his username again
#26
In my experience as a bassist, 90% of guitarists just want to shred and palm mute power chords.
The other 10% are proficient guitarists interested in other (better) forms of music, and aren't hung up on how good they look on stage and how fast they can play.
#27
I'd say they're actually pretty darn common.

Any good guitarist can adapt to play many different styles. Most just never have a reason to do so.

It's not like you have to completely relearn a different instrument.

Composing in several different styles, on the other hand....
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