#4
peak divided by root 2 = RMS
RMS time root 2 = peak

seriously...google is a nice thing.
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#5
and I should note that that assumes a sine wave. in a square wave, RMS = peak.
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#6
Peak power has no legal meaning so manufacturers can give any figure they want for peak power. the situation is also different for amps and speakers.

For speakers the rms power is usually measured by passing a noise signal for a few hours and seeing if the speaker overheats and burns out and there are legal guidelines on how this is done. The peak power is often simply how much power can be given before the speaker reaches the mechanical limit of its travel even if this is only for thousandths of a second but there are loads of other ways.

For amps the rms power is sometimes a soak test result like the speakers but is often the power it develops at a certain level of distortion. Technically an rms signal produces a peak voltage 1.414 (root 2)times the quoted value but amps often can produce brief peaks of extra power and sometimes these are given as peak power or even confusingly peak rms.

Google has a great article on this but unless you really want to get technical stick to rms and regard peak power as fairy dust.
#7
Good commnets from Phil. Wikipedia also has a good article on the subject.
Quote by kcdakrt
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#9
The square root of 2. Its approximately 1.414213562

150 divided by root 2 is approximately 106.0660172

Scientific calculator FTW.
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Last edited by wiliscool at Nov 2, 2009,
#12
just fyi, that also works with AC voltage. RMS in america is 120v, but it actuially hits 169.2v. That's what you feel when you get shocked by it.

There's your amazing fact for the day
#13
lol your full of suprises arent you.

since we're talking about ac and all, as you know jim, im building a pedal. i wanna add in a 9v jack in it. but im puzzled. the actual plug i use is going to be AC right? and then the jack is going to be DC? i havent seen any AC jacks.

anyways. i hope im not infringing any of the GB&C rules by going off topic.. sorta.
#15
i thought pedals use AC. :S grrr

all i want is 9v power for my pedal. what do i need?
#17
are boss style jacks availabe in like surplus stores? cuz thats where i buy my parts. i saw a 9v AC adapter today... i was thinking that it would work for my pedal...
#19
do you want me to stop posting on this thread and continue our little convo on my other thread?