#1
When ever I make my bridge switch flick to the crunch-est tone, it will make alot of static. Can this be because of my bridges are messed up?
#2
What? You mean whenever you flick the pickup selector to the bridge pickup it makes alot of static? What guitar and amp do you have?
Agile AL3000
Douglas WRL90
SX SR1 STD Plus
J&D Strat
Squier Tele
Sammick TR2
Douglas Draco
Peavey JSX
Bugera V5
TWANGED VJ
#3
Switch is most likely dirty, needs cleaning. If you're not comfortable doing this, take to a tech.

Ha - I just read it again too, and got a completely different question out of it! Awesome.
Last edited by Poster_Nutbag at Nov 1, 2009,
#4
I have an Fender Stratocaster and a Vox amp (I know this cannot be my amp because I have had 3 amps before and still had the same problem)
#5
Quote by vinxle
bridge switch flick to the crunch-est tone


OK, so this part makes no sense.. there's a pickup selector switch that will switch between the neck, middle and bridge pickups, you mean that?
#6
Im not sure. I do not know anything about guitar gear and im trying to figure it out. But it is the switch that is next to my volume knob.
Last edited by vinxle at Nov 1, 2009,
#7
Ok, so that's the pickup selector switch, I still say it's dirty and needs cleaning. Since the best way to get at it is to remove the pickguard (the big plastic sheet thingy) and you say you don't know anything about gear I'd suggest taking to a tech, then reading up so you don't have to take it to a tech next time.
#8
Just so we are on the same page.... But if it is only one tone, can it really be the need of cleaning?

#9
Wacky pic - anyway, YES - the arrow points to what I am talking about, when you move the thingy it goes scratchy scratchy because it's dirty.
#10
It sounds like you don't get what I mean, if I have it on the clearest or the most distorted (The very top and the very bottom of where the switch can go) it makes the amp have static.
#11
I have a fender lead II, this happens a lot, its not your amp or your guitar, it'syour gain level. The guitar tone you have set reacts with the gain and makes the staticy, buzzing noise your talking about. My advice, ignore it or buy a new guitar (the buzzing static stopped when I played on my friend's Bronze B C Rich mockingbird, so its not the amp)
"How can I be lost when I've got nowhere to go"
- MetallicA
What to do at a metal concert:

Last edited by Mtl2theend at Nov 1, 2009,
#12
So too much gain is a bad thing? (And thanks for looking at this one)
#13
Quote by vinxle
So too much gain is a bad thing? (And thanks for looking at this one)

Not necessarily, it depends on the guitar, for instance, on my lead it does this. with the exact same settings on my friend's B C Rich Mockingbird, it doesn't, strats aren't made for gain, that's why it happens
"How can I be lost when I've got nowhere to go"
- MetallicA
What to do at a metal concert:

#14
Thanks, now I learned something about guitar . But like in my other post....... do you think the 2nd guitar is decent for a metal beginner? Since metal has more gain (im guessing).
#15
Since it's Dean, yes, dean guitars are one of the leading metal guitar companies and their guitars can probably handle a lot of gain,

if you're still not sure check some videos on youtube, there are always demos of most guitars on there

EDIT: the humbucker pickups on it will handle that amount of gain, humbuckers are good distributors of gain, thats why a lot of people install them on their fenders, to get more gain
"How can I be lost when I've got nowhere to go"
- MetallicA
What to do at a metal concert:

Last edited by Mtl2theend at Nov 1, 2009,
#16
Quote by vinxle
It sounds like you don't get what I mean, if I have it on the clearest or the most distorted (The very top and the very bottom of where the switch can go) it makes the amp have static.


Oh OK.. so that switch selects between pickups, but you amp is distorting more on one position because one or more pickups has has a higher output and sigle coil pickups are noisier. Turn the gain down on the amp, but for evening out the guitar itself between switch positions you can try lowering the bridge pickup. Ideally you use the switch to choose between the different tones of each pickup, not for adding more crunch or distortion - for that you adjust the volume knob to vary the overall output of the guitar to the amp.
#17
I was going to save for an iceman, but I don't have that kind of money :/. But thank you! And if you speacil order does it cost extra money? Because guitar center website says you have to speacil order from the store.
#18
Quote by vinxle
I was going to save for an iceman, but I don't have that kind of money :/. But thank you! And if you speacil order does it cost extra money? Because guitar center website says you have to speacil order from the store.

I honestly wouldn't know, you might want to ask someone who's actually bought a guitar online from an online store, mine was handed down to me when my grandfather died, so, like I said, i wouldn't know
"How can I be lost when I've got nowhere to go"
- MetallicA
What to do at a metal concert:

#19
Quote by vinxle
It sounds like you don't get what I mean, if I have it on the clearest or the most distorted (The very top and the very bottom of where the switch can go) it makes the amp have static.


Huh?

A guitar doesn't increase in gain just by changing pickups.

FWIW... your contact points on your pickup selector are dirty, so the signal is unable to clearly transmit, cutting in and out every now and again, creating the static sound.
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.