Page 1 of 2
#1
Ive gone to sooo many shows looked at videos and all the basists use fender basses (well they look like they are anyway.)
all the punk hardcore bands use them and same with parkway drive, architects, bmth ect well they look like fenders.

So why do these bassists choose them over esp basses?
#3
yeaah no shit. but why choose a guitar that isnt designed for the genre over brands like esp which are designed for the genre
#6
Quote by lachyray
yeaah no shit. but why choose a guitar that isnt designed for the genre over brands like esp which are designed for the genre

They're generally not. Why would you play something you don't like as much when you have the choice of something you do like?
#7
Because Fenders kicks the shit out of ESP for basses?
Quote by Mad Marius
DBZ guitars, love'em. Especially their Les Piccolo model.
#8
its cause they get the most desirable tone for that genre, in punk P-bass's and Jazz are pretty much the staple.
Guitar Gear
Guitar: Ibanez GRG140 (black)
Amp:Peavey Vypyr 75


Bass Gear
Bass: Fender P-bass MIM,Peavey Millenium 5 BXP (x2),Epiphone Thunderbird
Amp:Ampeg PF500 w PF210 cab
Pedals: ODB-3,Big Muff.
#9
Maybe they just prefer how they play over the instruments that are designed for the genre and they use their amps or pedals to get the right sound.

Ibanez K5
Warwick Rockbass Vampyre 4

Line 6 Bass Pod XT Live
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
#10
Because they prefer the feel of Vintage-ish finesse.
"Black gives way to more black."




I have UG Black Style and I can barely read my signature.

Also, I like black.


~DawnwalkerALL HAIL COMRADE DAWNWALKER
#11
Because they like how they sound/play?


Nah, probably not that..
Quote by XxLloydxX
How young would you consider no-pedo attempt
#12


/THRED
"Black gives way to more black."




I have UG Black Style and I can barely read my signature.

Also, I like black.


~DawnwalkerALL HAIL COMRADE DAWNWALKER
#13
I dunno. It seems kind of counterintuitive- why get a naturally punchy bass then scoop the EQ so you can't be heard? But meh.

Ibanez SR506BM
Ashdown Little Giant 1000w
Peavey TVX 115+410
A big ass upright

#14
Quote by lachyray
yeaah no shit. but why choose a guitar that isnt designed for the genre over brands like esp which are designed for the genre


Because unlike guitars, basses can generally be used for nay genre. Hell, Martin Mendez of Opeth uses a Marcus Miller Jazz bass, whilst good ol' Phil Lynott used a BC Rich.
#15
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Because unlike guitars, basses can generally be used for nay genre. Hell, Martin Mendez of Opeth uses a Marcus Miller Jazz bass, whilst good ol' Phil Lynott used a BC Rich.



I don't ever recall him useing a B.C Rich bass... what part of his career did he start
playing those?


And TS, punks have always played Fenders. ESP isn't somethings punks would use that brand is geared more towards the metalheads.
--Gear--

5 piece blonde sparkle Gretch drum kit

-Drummers need their own forum-
Last edited by Phil Collins at Nov 2, 2009,
#16
Quote by Phil Collins
I don't ever recall him useing a B.C Rich bass... what part of his career did he start
playing those?


And TS, punks have always played Fenders. ESP isn't somethings punks would use that brand is geared more towards the metalheads.


He used a BC Rich Mockingbird for some of his career. Late 70's I believe.

EDIT:



Not an overtly clear pic, but that is a Mockingbird. From what I remember, it's a 1978 TJ Mockingbird.
#17
Quote by lachyray
Ive gone to sooo many shows looked at videos and all the basists use fender basses (well they look like they are anyway.)
all the punk hardcore bands use them and same with parkway drive, architects, bmth ect well they look like fenders.

So why do these bassists choose them over esp basses?


because they are the shit. if u have ever played one you should know.
#18
im sure not every single hardcore band uses a fender. a few do, because, like its been said, they are awesome basses and its a more common for basses to be used for many different genres.

i'm sure if you checked out any bassist, its likely that they have used a fender at some point during their careers. might sound like an ignorant statement, but when you have access to all the best gear, like they have, fender is an excellent choice for the vast majority of styles.
#19
Quote by JayLacelle
because they are the shit. if u have ever played one you should know.

If you had an opinion you'd totally use Fender because they're better than everything else.

Really, it doesn't matter what a brand gears their products to. They like Fender tone, that simple. Personally, I like playing metal on a fretless bass with a P and J pickup and a set of flats. Just sounds nice to me when I'm playing along with songs.


Quote by consecutive e
Because they like them better.


Quote by lachyray
yeaah no shit. but why choose a guitar that isnt designed for the genre over brands like esp which are designed for the genre

I don't understand what you're asking at all. Why do they use them? They like them. That's it, end of story, nothing else.

It doesn't matter if something is designed for a certain genre, that won't make it sound better to certain people.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
Last edited by BladeSlinger at Nov 2, 2009,
#20
Most all basses are versatile enough to cross genre lines with ease. You can use a Fender for anything really, as they just happen to be extremely versatile basses. Conversely, you could use an ESP/LTD for anything as well, its all about how the instrument feels to you, and if you can get a sound you like out of the thing
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#22
ESP basses just aren't good. IMO
Schecter Stiletto Studio 5
Ibanez SRX2EX1
Gallien Krueger 1001rbii
Gallien Krueger Neo 410
#23
Quote by lachyray
Ive gone to sooo many shows looked at videos and all the basists use fender basses (well they look like they are anyway.)
all the punk hardcore bands use them and same with parkway drive, architects, bmth ect well they look like fenders.

So why do these bassists choose them over esp basses?

both of these aint punk those are metalcore and BMTH is more Deatcore *pukes*


Architects new album is pretty punky, theres a few really nice songs on it.


Want real hardcore look at the likes of Black Flag,Kid Dynamite,Bad Brains etc you know where im going with this.
Guitar Gear
Guitar: Ibanez GRG140 (black)
Amp:Peavey Vypyr 75


Bass Gear
Bass: Fender P-bass MIM,Peavey Millenium 5 BXP (x2),Epiphone Thunderbird
Amp:Ampeg PF500 w PF210 cab
Pedals: ODB-3,Big Muff.
#25
Quote by Casketcreep
These are the bands I think of when people say hardcore.


Yeah, those crazy kids changed the meaning when weren't looking, kinda like with emo...

Fugazi--->Fall Out Boy
Black Flag--->Parkway Drive

It's only natural I guess.
#27
Quote by Casketcreep
Heavy metal - Bullet for my valentine.
Jazz - Amy bloody Winehouse.



I hate my generation.


Heavey metal has been used to describe a huge range of bands, from Metallica, to Led Zeppelin and Queen. BFMV is a fair bit closer to the "normal view of heavy metal than the latter two.

Amy Winehouse also has a large jazz influence in her music. Probably why she's played the Montreal Jazz Festival. Things change and evolve, and Amy Winehouse has taken a fair number of genres and brought them together into a pretty good package, including jazz. She may not be a pure jazz artist, but surely jazz is all about "absorbing and transforming influences" as quoted from Andrew Gilbert. Sure, she may be a wreck, but her music is great.
#28
fender basses are just the best. I have honestly never played another bass I like better.
#29
Quote by SOADriff
Because Fenders kicks the shit out of ESP for basses?
+1.

Honestly, Fenders are designed to play whatever kind of music you want. Fender basses are arguably some of the most versatile basses.

Quote by Tostitos
Most all basses are versatile enough to cross genre lines with ease.
However much I tend to agree with that, that's a pretty bold statement to make. Plenty of basses are not that versatile at all.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Nov 2, 2009,
#30
Quote by food1010
However much I tend to agree with that, that's a pretty bold statement to make. Plenty of basses are not that versatile at all.

I know its a bit of a bold statement. I was more trying to say that the majority of basses out there will function perfectly well when used in various genres and settings. Some things are purpose built for one thing, but in this case (Fender vs. ESP) both basses can cross genre/style lines. Cheers on calling me out on my ridiculous statement though

EDIT: also though, IMO, Fender >>> ESP
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
Last edited by Tostitos at Nov 2, 2009,
#31
I'm gonna say the reason for Fenders prominence in all genre's is 1 part the Instrument, 3 parts marketing, 2 parts luck.

There are more versatile, better made basses out there, you'd be a fool to deny that. I'm not saying they are not a good bass, simply that as an artist in these bands earning all that money you could afford something more. But they stick with them and love them, why? The answer lies in the marketing.

The 3 parts marketing,

Fender gives away so many endorsements, more then any other company I'd wager so you will see every second bassist playing one (and lets face it, like a free beer a free bass is the best thing ever). Most people who idolize a musician will want the instrument they are playing, Fender knows this well.

Squire. Fenders dark horse. By making these cheap copies of the higher end instruments they get beginners accustomed to a fender style bass which I'd say at least 1/3 of the time means those beginners will play fender the rest of their lives.

The assumption that because they are original and therefore the best. Can't ever recall seeing a fender poster saying those exact words because they don't need to be said. They let products like the Custom '51 P-bass and the Vintage Modified Squire's remind us they've been around forever. Which tied in with endorsements with new artists makes sure that they still are at the forefront of modern music.

As far as the 2 parts luck, they are lucky that when Gibson has made a good bass it hasn't sold well. The final part luck is they happened to be the best when they came out.
Gear:
Washburn RB2500 (5 String)
Yamaha BB400 Fretless (1981)
Carlo Giordano 3/4 Upright (White)
Cort Action 4 (Stereo-fied)
Orange Bass Terror 500
Orange 1x15 Cab
Boss GT-6 Bass Multi-effects
#32
^
For the most part, I'd agree with what you said. However, there is a quality factor involved. Good marketing can do wonders (especially the indoctrinating beginners with the Squier brand), but if they didn't have some amount of quality and versatility, all the marketing in the world couldn't help (for example, Dean: marketed very well towards a specific audience with flashy graphics and shapes, but you don't see too many in the hands of pros because of skimpy quality).
Another thing to consider would be that they are generally superb for their price. Granted there are other options, but a $500 MIM P bass could easily serve you well for a lifetime. And since the parts are widely available, maintenance and restoration are relatively cheap and easy
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#33
i love the sound of fender basses, but not every bass you see that looks like a fender is one, they are copied like crazy, even by other big brands. ive been fooled quite a few times
Gear:
My Voice
PRS Tremonti II
PRS Hollowbody II w/ Piezo Blue Matteo
PRS 513 25th anniversary
PRS Tremonti SE
Fender John Mayer Relic strat "the black one"

did i mention i like PRS?

20th Anniversary Bogner Shiva
#34
Quote by Tostitos
^
For the most part, I'd agree with what you said. However, there is a quality factor involved. Good marketing can do wonders (especially the indoctrinating beginners with the Squier brand), but if they didn't have some amount of quality and versatility, all the marketing in the world couldn't help (for example, Dean: marketed very well towards a specific audience with flashy graphics and shapes, but you don't see too many in the hands of pros because of skimpy quality).
Another thing to consider would be that they are generally superb for their price. Granted there are other options, but a $500 MIM P bass could easily serve you well for a lifetime. And since the parts are widely available, maintenance and restoration are relatively cheap and easy

I never said they were a bad bass, in fact i think they are great as far as build quality and versatility, but i would never play one - they don't suit me.

Also I agree with your last point about them being cheap for what they are. But when you look at a brand like Cort or Yamaha they do the same sort of thing just as well or better for the same price or less. Especially in Australia, where a standard MIM retails for around $1000 whereas the Cort B4 offers active electronics and better build quality for about $800. Or if you aren't into the actives for the same price as the Cort you can get a G&L Tribute with an extremely versatile pickup system that gets almost any tone through coil tapping and a series/parallel switch.
Gear:
Washburn RB2500 (5 String)
Yamaha BB400 Fretless (1981)
Carlo Giordano 3/4 Upright (White)
Cort Action 4 (Stereo-fied)
Orange Bass Terror 500
Orange 1x15 Cab
Boss GT-6 Bass Multi-effects
#35
Quote by Double Basser
Or if you aren't into the actives for the same price as the Cort you can get a G&L Tribute with an extremely versatile pickup system that gets almost any tone through coil tapping and a series/parallel switch.

Ok, I'm in complete agreement with you now, you said the magic words (G&L)
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#36
^and they are not just magic in words either
Gear:
Washburn RB2500 (5 String)
Yamaha BB400 Fretless (1981)
Carlo Giordano 3/4 Upright (White)
Cort Action 4 (Stereo-fied)
Orange Bass Terror 500
Orange 1x15 Cab
Boss GT-6 Bass Multi-effects
#37
Because most people are mature enough to understand that they don't need a pointy bass shaped like a battle-axe to play heavy music. I think a better question is, why would anyone want to play an ESP as opposed to a Fender? What does ESP do to speccifically cater to hardcore musicians other than taking a standard Fender/Gibson body style and canting it and making some edges sharper?
#38
Quote by Deliriumbassist
He used a BC Rich Mockingbird for some of his career. Late 70's I believe.

EDIT:



Not an overtly clear pic, but that is a Mockingbird. From what I remember, it's a 1978 TJ Mockingbird.



Damn. I'm a massive Lizzy/Lynott fan and I've never seen that pic. Thanks bro...
--Gear--

5 piece blonde sparkle Gretch drum kit

-Drummers need their own forum-
#40
This becomes an even more interesting question when you consider how hardcores love to talk about how much they hate corporations, when Fender are the biggest guitar corporation in the world, and the only company that does more typical corporate bullshit than them is Gibson.
Quote by C0_0kie
guitar solo - "meh, every song got one"
bass solo - "OMGZ0R U IS PRO MENZ"


Quote by lucertia.
fapfapfapfapfapfap


burgerburgerburgerburger


Quote by DeAd-RiP
Sir I would like to sex your bass.
Page 1 of 2