#1
So do modes exist for other scales, other than the C major scale? Like for D major?

Do modes and scales degrees exist for minor scales like A minor?
#2
Yes. People use C major as an example for the diatonic modes because it has no sharps and no flats; the diatonic modes are the same for any of the 12 (15) keys you can think of. And yes you can form modes from minor scales, harmonic minor has modes such as phrygian dominant etc. and a great example of "newer" modes are the modes of the jazz minor scale (at least, that's what everyone calls it where I'm taught, could be something different, basically it's a major scale with a lowered third).

Anyway this will probably get closed as they will tell you to read the theory sticky, which you probably should just to reclarify, it's a pretty good source of info, although you can PM me for more info if it's still not clear, or some other experienced user of course, not sure what their reception would be though.

Hope this helps.
#5
You can find scale degrees and relative modes to go along with any scale.

With minor scales, the modes will be the same as the modes of its relative major.

As the others have said read stickies and articles. The forums are not intended for us to explain everything about a specific topic; They are simply here so we can answer any specific questions you might have.
#6
Modes are for any major scale.

The dorian mode based off the C major scale is D dorian

C major= C, D, E, F, G, A, B
D Dorian = D, E, F, G, A, B, C

The dorian mode based off G major is A Dorian

G major= G, A, B, C, D, E, F#
A Dorian= A, B, C, D, E, F#, G


There are also modes of harmonic minor, melodic minor, pentatonic scales, and other hybrid scales.
I think you should concentrate on the major modes before you go onto these others, as they all just relate back to the major scale..
Last edited by mdwallin at Nov 3, 2009,