#1
If anybody knows German fairly well, can you explain how you know if a word is feminine, masculine, neuter, or plural? Like how do you tell the difference? Also, then how do you know if it's nominative, accusative, dative, or genitive? Thanks.
Quote by NGD1313
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#2
im currently taking deutsch also. i have an A, but i really have no idea whats going on in that class

EDIT: i guess what im trying to say is its impossible

the only things ive learned is futtert die hund, das geshirr spullen, they like the brewskys, and they have nude parks for the old guys
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Last edited by jbswreckfest at Nov 2, 2009,
#3
im in german 1, die is feminine and plural, das is masculine, and der is neuter, dont know a thing about cases yet
#4
Ich bin in Deutsch III!!

but yea, you can't really tell unless you can see the article

das=neuter
der=masculine
die=feminine or plural

unless it's in some wierd case like Genetiv which I don't understand anyway.
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#5
you can't always know what gender a word is, but there are some things that can give a hint about it. google will be your best friend for this, but a quick search and racking of my own brain says: -in, -ik, -el, -e are generally feminine, -er is usually masculine. most animals are masculine as well, but there are exceptions to this as well ie 'die katze'.

cases are even more confusing than genders, but learning them is one of the most important things to german grammar. there is a chart that you can find anywhere online telling you what article goes with which gender and which case, and then you just need to use that and the grammar of the sentence to find out which case you are in.
#6
yeah, bomtoy has it. there is no real way to determine the gender of a noun, its just... labeled as such pretty much. I mean, pants are feminine and skirt is masculent. its confusing, you just have to memorize them
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#8
It's completely memorization. There are a few guidelines, but there are no rules to how genders are.

edit: as far as case goes:

nomnitave: the subject of the sentence. Whatever is doing the action.
Accusative: the direct object. whatever the action is happening too.
dative: indirect object. Whatever recieves the benefit of the action.

Example: Ich habe die blumen fur meiner mutter gekauft.

Ich is nomnitave, die blumen is accustive, and mutter is dative.

Genitive sucks, and I don't know it that well.
Last edited by pantera456 at Nov 2, 2009,
#9
Quote by Jacob6293
If anybody knows German fairly well, can you explain how you know if a word is feminine, masculine, neuter, or plural? Like how do you tell the difference? Also, then how do you know if it's nominative, accusative, dative, or genitive? Thanks.


shouldn't that be neutral?
#11
Quote by dhutton
shouldn't that be neutral?



No, they refer to it as neuter. Same way in Latin. I would assume for other languages as well.
#12
Quote by skankinlaxer74
im in german 1, die is feminine and plural, das is masculine, and der is neuter, dont know a thing about cases yet

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I loled
#13
Quote by pantera456
It's completely memorization. There are a few guidelines, but there are no rules to how genders are.

edit: as far as case goes:

nomnitave: the subject of the sentence. Whatever is doing the action.
Accusative: the direct object. whatever the action is happening too.
dative: indirect object. Whatever recieves the benefit of the action.

Example: Ich habe die blumen fur meiner mutter gekauft.

Ich is nomnitave, die blumen is accustive, and mutter is dative.

Genitive sucks, and I don't know it that well.

Genetive = of the or possesion
#15
I think the genders have been explained to you without me adding to it.

As for cases, you know where they will appear based on their function in a sentence.

We have them in English too, but they aren't marked as separate words (except in personal pronouns) so most people don't realise they are different.

Example: John hit Dave. Which is nominative and which is accusative? not always obvious. But:
He hit him... suddenly obvious. He is for nominative and him is for accusative. The object is ALWAYS accusative in a basic sentence like that.

In this one: He gave him the money. The subject is 'the money' because "he gave him" doesn't make sense, so the money is still accusative. Him is the second subject though, because "he gave the money" also doesn't make sense. So him is in the Dative case. In German this is marked, so it is obvious.
Genitive is for possession so that one's fairly easy.
#16
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
I think the genders have been explained to you without me adding to it.

As for cases, you know where they will appear based on their function in a sentence.

We have them in English too, but they aren't marked as separate words (except in personal pronouns) so most people don't realise they are different.

Example: John hit Dave. Which is nominative and which is accusative? not always obvious. But:
He hit him... suddenly obvious. He is for nominative and him is for accusative. The object is ALWAYS accusative in a basic sentence like that.

In this one: He gave him the money. The subject is 'the money' because "he gave him" doesn't make sense, so the money is still accusative. Him is the second subject though, because "he gave the money" also doesn't make sense. So him is in the Dative case. In German this is marked, so it is obvious.
Genitive is for possession so that one's fairly easy.


Hey what other languages do you know?

I always thought German was a fascinating language but it sounds so angry to me
#17
Quote by Z_cup_boy
Hey what other languages do you know?

I always thought German was a fascinating language but it sounds so angry to me



Well that depends on your tone of voice

I learnt French in school though I am in desperate need of a refresher on it, I can speak German and Finnish, and I'm learning some form of Nordic language for this project I'm doing, probably Swedish. So not really many
#19
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
Well that depends on your tone of voice

I learnt French in school though I am in desperate need of a refresher on it, I can speak German and Finnish, and I'm learning some form of Nordic language for this project I'm doing, probably Swedish. So not really many


ohh haha. Cool. French is too seductive to be taken seriously if someone speaks it angrily. Swedish sounds good overall, was thinking of learning it but I think I'll learn Norwegian instead. Do you use Rosetta stone or anything like that?
#20
Quote by Z_cup_boy
ohh haha. Cool. French is too seductive to be taken seriously if someone speaks it angrily. Swedish sounds good overall, was thinking of learning it but I think I'll learn Norwegian instead. Do you use Rosetta stone or anything like that?


Nah just language textbooks and the like. Norwegian and Swedish are pretty similar actually (well that's what Kensai will tell people) but good luck with it!

It's easier if you already know German, although knowing English makes it easier too.
#21
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
Nah just language textbooks and the like. Norwegian and Swedish are pretty similar actually (well that's what Kensai will tell people) but good luck with it!

It's easier if you already know German, although knowing English makes it easier too.


Same language root correct?
#22
Quote by Z_cup_boy
Same language root correct?


Well they all do if you go back far enough

but yeah in terms of Germanic languages there's east Germanic (all dead languages), west Germanic (German, Frisian, Dutch, English...) and North Germanic, which is Norwegian, Icelandic, Faroese, Swedish etc. North Germanic languages all come from Old Norse.

Danish and Swedish are still especially similar, I hear.
#23
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
Well they all do if you go back far enough

but yeah in terms of Germanic languages there's east Germanic (all dead languages), west Germanic (German, Frisian, Dutch, English...) and North Germanic, which is Norwegian, Icelandic, Faroese, Swedish etc. North Germanic languages all come from Old Norse.

Danish and Swedish are still especially similar, I hear.


Twas what I meant


I think all the scandinavian languages are fair similar actually. Different pronunciation though.
#24
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
In this one: He gave him the money. The subject is 'the money' because "he gave him" doesn't make sense, so the money is still accusative. Him is the second subject though, because "he gave the money" also doesn't make sense. So him is in the Dative case. In German this is marked, so it is obvious.
Genitive is for possession so that one's fairly easy.

I'm pretty sure 'He' is the subject, 'the money' is the object and 'him' is the indirect object. But other than that, you're right.
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#25
at this point is where i got confused and dropped the class and i was an student who got a standard grade 2 in this LOL.

Its really confusing and even harder to explain tbh.
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#26
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez

Danish and Swedish are still especially similar, I hear.


No they're different, some words are similar but the pronounciations, 90% of the words, even the way they count is different.

A dane might understand swedish though, but swedes usually have no idea what they're saying.
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#27
Quote by lespaul1216
Ich bin in Deutsch III!!

but yea, you can't really tell unless you can see the article

das=neuter
der=masculine
die=feminine or plural


unless it's in some wierd case like Genetiv which I don't understand anyway.

Is this correct? Because if it is, it would really help to just memorize that.
Quote by NGD1313
Well I don't know about solos but how about that Smoke on the Water riff. It's like...impossible.


THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE

I'm Jake. I'm a musician, philosopher, and exhibitionist.