#1
This is really an observation if anything, but I've been wondering...how come in general the world of bass is more unconventional and experimental then that of the guitar world? I mean basses tend to be build in more unconvential shapes, made out of exotic woods, have unique features, ect while guitars generally don't stray out of the convential strat/LP shapes and have the same wood materials. It's like guitars havent really evolved much where as basses have gone through tons of evolutions in designs, sounds and build material. I don't know much about either but how come basses, bass players and bass companies tend to be more out of the box then their guitar counterparts?
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#3
because we like to experiment. out of the box > awesome.

i can't really go any more in depth with that.
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#4
Don't quote me on this, but I heard somewhere that a basses tone is less influanced by its wood than a guitar is, especially when active. Not sure though so whatever.
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#5
a lot of guitar players (and not all by any means, don't flame me) play guitar for the sake of playing a guitar. Whether the reasoning be that it makes them cool/hot or that they think they have the 'most superior' instrument, many play the instrument they have for the wrong reasons so guitars are made on a large scale as they have for a long time because that's what people in general want, the same as everyone else has.

What I'm basically saying is that to want to be a bass player, generally you have an interest in the way music is formed and the layers that make up the whole, not just the obvious lead line that everyone else hears. And because of this, bass players can often be more fussy about their build options/woods/tone etc.
The same answer could be applied to why so many basses have onboard preamps while guitars normally just have 'volume' and 'tone'.
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#6
I blame chords. they make simple effects seem much more powerful when all used at once.
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#7
Quote by the_perdestrian
Don't quote me on this, but I heard somewhere that a basses tone is less influanced by its wood than a guitar is, especially when active. Not sure though so whatever.

I've always heard the wood and bridge affect tone more so on bass.
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#8
Quote by lordofthefood1
I've always heard the wood and bridge affect tone more so on bass.


This would make sense since the timbre of the bass is more harmonically complex than that of the guitar. More information going on, hence more to be affected by the tone wood. I think that would be compounded by the fact that the typical bass player plays clean much more often than the typical guitar player.
Last edited by dullsilver_mike at Nov 3, 2009,
#9
I think a big part of it is model/brand loyalty too. Yes, us bassists have our "set-the-standard" basses like the good ol' Fender P and J's, but our instruments aren't as "iconic" as certain guitars. Like the Fender Strat and the Gibson Les Paul. If your a young, beginning guitarist (I'm just going off my own observations here), you learn that the Strat is like the "standard" and the Les Paul is the embodiment of a high end guitar. Therefore, you start with your little Squier, move to a regular Strat, then if you want to, eventually the Gibson (this is also, a gross generalization, but it more the point im trying to make). I also blame the traditionalists who want traditional LPs and pre-CBS strat reissues.

More to the point, bassists seem to have more options. And since most basses are versatile enough to fit multiple genres, you don't get the super pointy br00tal metal one-trick-pony instrument that you only play deathmetal with (again another gross generalization), but if you wanted, you could use a "metal" bass for jazz just fine or vice versa. Basses just seem more flexible
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#10
*Reads the title without even skimming through the OP.*

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#11
Because guitarists are almost never playing with a clean tone. Theres almost always distortion or effects, or at the very least, tones of EQing going on. So the sound of the guitar itself is less important because its often "covered up" anyways.

But the basses tone is almost always clean, which means the bass itself has more room to influence tone. Its the same thing with acoustic guitars.
#12
Quote by Cody_Grey102
*Reads the title without even skimming through the OP.*

Because we're secretly smarter than guitards. We get shit done.

The man speaks the truth.

Also, I couldn't agree with OP more. Nearly every guitarist I know plays metal or rock and all have aspirations of being shredders. Whereas the bassists, I'll give you a short list.
-One is a trad head, who spends more time with his pipes than his bass
-one is in a jazz funk band
-ska band
-metal band (he doesn't count though, he's a root noter through and through)

You get the picture.