#1
What's the difference between a 'good' and a 'bad' electric guitar?

For example, I have a Fender Squier, and I've heard that it's a sort of cheaper version of the Stratocaster, so what makes the Strat triple it's price?

#2
better wood,better hardware, higher attention to detail, especially to the neck(which you are in contact with 99.9999999% of the time), so better feel.
#3
You have a squier strat, not a fender squier.
Better woods, better hardware, better build quality, better quality control, more features, etc.

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#4
mainly pickups, theyare the greater part of the sound(on an electric), i own a squier and the neck is really comfortable
#5
Quote by plabon
mainly pickups, theyare the greater part of the sound(on an electric), i own a squier and the neck is really comfortable


bahahaha dude you must think your the greatest. pickups don't make a guitar
it is everything about it just like the guys before have said
as you could have the best sounding pickups but with the shitest quality wood it won't sound any good and like wise
hence the price of guitars are so varied in this day and age
#6
Quote by plabon
mainly pickups, theyare the greater part of the sound(on an electric), i own a squier and the neck is really comfortable





Its not just the pickups.

Different woods resonate differently, offering warmer or brighter tones and more or less sustain.

Cheaper hardware tends to have more flaws (such as burs in a saddle for example). Also, the type of metal that the bridge is made of affects your tone.

Cheaper guitars use cheaper electronics which are more likely to wear out and can ruin your tone.

Also, more expensive guitars are normally created with more attention to detail (i.e. a Fender Strat is less likely to have a bad connection in the electronics or a curve in the neck than a Squire would).
#7
plus more expensive guitars are usually given more indiviual attention to mke sure that there a good
cheap ones are made by the dozen
#8
Play one and feel the difference.
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#9
Quote by Deep*Kick
Play one and feel the difference.


The West Aussie speaks the truth, pick up a cheap LTD guitar and then pick up an ESP guitar and notice the difference in overall quality of the ESP guitar and then cry yourself to sleep knowing what you are missing out on.
#10
Quote by azn_guitarist25
The West Aussie speaks the truth, pick up a cheap LTD guitar and then pick up an ESP guitar and notice the difference in overall quality of the ESP guitar and then cry yourself to sleep knowing what you are missing out on.


If he's very new then he may not notice a huge difference. He'll most likely notice some differences, but not all of them.

Like the people above have said, on the Fender Stratocaster you get...
better wood (makes a big difference in sound)
better pickups (makes a big difference in sound)
better wiring (doesn't change the sound as much as the above two, but it will last longer)
better pots/input jack/tuners/bridge/nut/other hardware (makes a big difference in sound and reliability)
better neck in a lot of ways (makes a big difference in how easy it is to play)

...basically better everything.

You currently have a Squire Stratocaster and the simple truth is that a Fender Stratocaster (especially the american models) will be a much better guitar. HOWEVER... your current guitar is just fine for a beginner. When you get better you'll want a better guitar, but your current one is not bad at all for a starter.

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Beat the recession by soldering your strings back together! What's more, the extra metal vibrating back and forth will add to your tone... and what could be more metal than more metal!?!

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#11
If you can't tell the difference when you play them, you don't need to worry about it yet.
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#12
I love the Epiphone originals!! I got one of the Wilshire Arctic White Limited Editions for Christmas last year and it is a rocking guitar. I might be in the minority here but I wish they would stop making the Gibson copies and make just originals even producing some new models.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#13
Quote by The_Future_Soon
If he's very new then he may not notice a huge difference. He'll most likely notice some differences, but not all of them.

Like the people above have said, on the Fender Stratocaster you get...
better wood (makes a big difference in sound)
better pickups (makes a big difference in sound)
better wiring (doesn't change the sound as much as the above two, but it will last longer)
better pots/input jack/tuners/bridge/nut/other hardware (makes a big difference in sound and reliability)
better neck in a lot of ways (makes a big difference in how easy it is to play)

...basically better everything.

You currently have a Squire Stratocaster and the simple truth is that a Fender Stratocaster (especially the american models) will be a much better guitar. HOWEVER... your current guitar is just fine for a beginner. When you get better you'll want a better guitar, but your current one is not bad at all for a starter.



Thanks for the great answer. I started guitar 5 months ago, and I teach myself, so while I can play songs my knowledge of the guitar and hardware is really limited.

But, I can play Jimi Hendrix's All Along The Watchtower solo's, and when I listen to his version I know I'm not as good as that but I can accurately play it. I just want to know where my level falls under, would that be beginner or intermediate? Sorry for the difficult question, I just wish I had a pro to tell me if I'm coming along all right - preferably one that can actually listen to me but yeah
#14
I actually got to play an older epiphone guitar - this thing was like 20(?) years old. It was an amazing guitar. The build quality was great in my book.

It's not just the woods. Any guitar needs to be properly set up by a luthier/guitar tech. It costs you money, but it can double the guitar's value.

You need to get the frets leveled/crowned, the neck nut properly filed, the neck straightened, the electronics checked , etc. It can do wonders for any guitar.
Last edited by sergiu at Nov 3, 2009,
#15
Quote by sergiu

You need to get the frets leveled/crowned, the neck nut properly filed, the neck straightened, the electronics checked , etc. It can do wonders for any guitar.


What do you mean by the frets levelled?
#16
Quote by yorkey
What do you mean by the frets levelled?


He means that all frets (the metal thingies) should have the same measures and none of them should be sticking out and/or the 45° degree on the sides.
#17
Quote by Knappe Turk
He means that all frets (the metal thingies) should have the same measures and none of them should be sticking out and/or the 45° degree on the sides.


Ah those metal thingies, I never knew what they were before... Thanks for the heads up (Y)

But thanks though.
#18
in my opinion, the most important factor in a good guitar is the wood. if you get quality wood that is prepared properly, then you can make a good guitar. if the wood isn't of good quality, the rest is useless. that (and variances in craftsmanship) is what makes guitars of the same hardware, electronics, etc... sound different.