#1
Would I be right in thinking the best way to get key signatures and everything of that ilk down would be to go around memorizing the fretboard, and then (as a separate exercise), playing in different keys to remember what notes are in which keys?

Or is there a better way (eg: learning shapes, formulas) of understanding this?

Cheers,
Fraser
#2
The best way to learn key signatures is to learn how to build scales - and memorize the circle of fifths. It's also advisable to learn the notes on the fretboard - but using one to learn the other could be a problem....because if you learn one wrong, you'll learn both wrong.

And I think you have it a little backwards - you can't play in a key to help yourself memorize the notes in that key.....you have to know the notes in the key (and where to find those notes on the fretboard) before you can play in the key.
Gear

Gibson '57 Les Paul Reissue
Marshall TSL 601
EHX: Big Muff, Metal Muff, Small Stone, POG, 2880
Ibanez TS808
Voodoo Labs Microvibe
Analogman Chorus
Morley Bad Horsie II
Keeley Compressor (C4)
Nova Delay
MXR 10-band EQ
#3
Fretboard - Circle of Fifths - Scale Intervals.

Not exactly in that order, but each of them help with the others. After that it's just practice and repetition.
404: Sig not found.
Last edited by ChrisN at Nov 4, 2009,
#4
Quote by Fraserwatt
Would I be right in thinking the best way to get key signatures and everything of that ilk down would be to go around memorizing the fretboard, and then (as a separate exercise), playing in different keys to remember what notes are in which keys?

Or is there a better way (eg: learning shapes, formulas) of understanding this?

Cheers,
Fraser



There isn't necessarily one "best way". All of the things you mentioned will ultimately help you towards your goal. It comes down to experience, the more you have the better you'll understand this stuff. It takes time, so you have to be patient. Don't look for short cuts..... look to truly learn the material.


PS. For key signatures and things of that nature...... reading music on a regular basis is very helpful.
shred is gaudy music
#5
^
I think of each note, and I think it is important that you do. If you want to be able to predict what the note your about to play in your solo (eg. while improvising) will sound like, then you have to know what note it is, not just what key or scale it's in.

For example, if you have a C chord then an F might not sound good over it because it might clash with the E. If you know the notes you could predict this, if not then you could not.

TS, that is a good way to learn scales but a very easy way of learning both the notes on the fretboard and the notes in each key is to play from standard notation (as Munky has already said).

The first instrument I played was the violin and I never sat down and tried to learn all the notes on the violin. Instead I started off with easy pieces and build up the difficulty slowly. This meant that I ended up learning all of the notes on the fretboard and on the music but I never had to sit down and memorise them all.

Similarly, playing music in simple keys like D (violinists' favourite key), A or G allowed me to learn the notes in these keys perfectly and gradually I ended up knowing most of the common keys. Then the harder the music I was playing got, the more I started learning less common keys. Again, this meant I learnt the notes in all the keys but didn't have to learn them all in one go. It also meant I could work on my technique at the same time, as well as just enjoying playing music.

Reading music also helps cement the keys and the notes into your mind. I could tell you practically any (useful (one that doesn't have a simpler equivalent)) key barely thinking about it.
#6
the importance of memorizing the circle of fifths can not be stressed enough. once i did that and learned intervals, everything else just kind of fell into place.
Rig:
Jay Turser ES-335 w/ 2 Burstbuckers OR
J&E Custom w Duncan SSL3 and SHL59>
MXR Dynacomp>
Ibanez TS-9>
Dunlop Crybaby>
Fender Hot Rod DeVille 212
effects loop:
Boss BD-2>
Danelectro Vibe>
Boss DD-6>
Morley Volume

my shit screams.
#7
Quote by JRKul393
the importance of memorizing the circle of fifths can not be stressed enough. once i did that and learned intervals, everything else just kind of fell into place.


what would you say the best way of memorizing the circle of fifths is. just trying to memorize, or is there some activity or exercise to make learning it more effective?

cheers for all the answers guys, I'll start reading standard music notation as well.
#8
Quote by Fraserwatt
what would you say the best way of memorizing the circle of fifths is. just trying to memorize, or is there some activity or exercise to make learning it more effective?

cheers for all the answers guys, I'll start reading standard music notation as well.
I learnt it as Battle Ends And Down Goes Charles' Father (order of flats) and Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle (order of sharps). Put that together with a bit of understanding and you can draw it out anytime.
Last edited by zhilla at Nov 4, 2009,
#9
Quote by zhilla
I learnt it as Battle Ends And Goes Charles' Father (order of flats) and Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle (order of sharps). Put that together with a bit of understanding and you can draw it out anytime.


ive always used Frank Can Go Down And Eat Breakfast for sharps and then just backwards for flats. same thing either way though.

thats the only trick i know of of that would help in the memorization. it just needs to be done.
Rig:
Jay Turser ES-335 w/ 2 Burstbuckers OR
J&E Custom w Duncan SSL3 and SHL59>
MXR Dynacomp>
Ibanez TS-9>
Dunlop Crybaby>
Fender Hot Rod DeVille 212
effects loop:
Boss BD-2>
Danelectro Vibe>
Boss DD-6>
Morley Volume

my shit screams.
#10
Just get a circle of fifths tattooed on your left forearm....then you won't have to memorize it.
Gear

Gibson '57 Les Paul Reissue
Marshall TSL 601
EHX: Big Muff, Metal Muff, Small Stone, POG, 2880
Ibanez TS808
Voodoo Labs Microvibe
Analogman Chorus
Morley Bad Horsie II
Keeley Compressor (C4)
Nova Delay
MXR 10-band EQ
#11
Quote by Guitartist
Just get a circle of fifths tattooed on your left forearm....then you won't have to memorize it.

i like your style sir....
Rig:
Jay Turser ES-335 w/ 2 Burstbuckers OR
J&E Custom w Duncan SSL3 and SHL59>
MXR Dynacomp>
Ibanez TS-9>
Dunlop Crybaby>
Fender Hot Rod DeVille 212
effects loop:
Boss BD-2>
Danelectro Vibe>
Boss DD-6>
Morley Volume

my shit screams.
#12
I have to say, I learned key sigs and theory in general without the circle of 5ths, and had no trouble.

It is a nice visual aid, and I wouldn't discourage looking into it, but I will say that ultimately that stuff's gotta be in your head. You don't want to have to look at a chart every time you need to know a key sig. You just gotta know it.
shred is gaudy music