#1
Right lets just give you chords first to each section of the song.

Intro - G/E/C/D, G/E/C

Verse - G, D, C, E, D

Chorus - G,D,A


So my question is... In the chorus i sing a notes without sharps or flats however one note i sing is a C#. It sounds right when i'm playing the chords and singing but i'm not sure if this should be a natural C. I know you might think i'm being stupid or perhaps thick, but I would appreciate it if you could help me out.

Also the key of the song is in what: G, C?
#2
If it sounds right, then it's fine. You're using an E major chord which has a G# in it anyway.
#3
What are you writing in ? Minor or major key ? perhaps modal ?
I assume a major key.

Since you're using an E and A, G or C as key is not possible.
And yes, that should be a C# in the chorus, your A chord also contains a C#.


Start with determining your key, and work from there.
#4
Quote by guitaristben
Right lets just give you chords first to each section of the song.

Intro - G/E/C/D, G/E/C

Verse - G, D, C, E, D

Chorus - G,D,A


So my question is... In the chorus i sing a notes without sharps or flats however one note i sing is a C#. It sounds right when i'm playing the chords and singing but i'm not sure if this should be a natural C. I know you might think i'm being stupid or perhaps thick, but I would appreciate it if you could help me out.

Also the key of the song is in what: G, C?

Key is probably C, as G would make those Es into Ems. You could sing C# as an accidental, but I wouldn't use it for any held notes, unless you slid back down to C in plenty of time for it to resolve.
#6
if it sounds right it is right.

the C# in G is the b5 or #4 depending how how to want to look at it.
the C# in D is its major 7th
the C# in A is its 3rd

all these sound good in my opinion (depending on the voicings/voice leading)
#7
Quote by J-Master
What are you writing in ? Minor or major key ? perhaps modal ?
I assume a major key.

Since you're using an E and A, G or C as key is not possible.
And yes, that should be a C# in the chorus, your A chord also contains a C#.


Start with determining your key, and work from there.

There's such a thing as non-diatonic music, you know.
#8
I think the old adage is if it sounds right it is right and someone somewhere will have a theory to explain it.

For the keys what does it resolve etc to but
if I were to take a punt I would go for G for the verse D for the chorus.

All formulated out of my own extensive ignorance.
#10
Quote by blue_strat
There's such a thing as non-diatonic music, you know.

this guy can't figure out his song's key, let alone that he's writing chromatic music.
#12
Quote by J-Master
this guy can't figure out his song's key, let alone that he's writing chromatic music.


That's not the point, the point is that you said:
Quote by J-Master

Since you're using an E and A, G or C as key is not possible.


Whereas being is C is perfectly possible. The E could be the dominant of Am, and the A could be borrowed from the tonic minor key (these are boths "coulds").

Anyway, TS there is nothing to say you can't sing a C# there. The thing you should think about is if you like how it sounds. If yes, then keep it, if no, then don't. Then once you have decided you can try and use theory to analyse it if you wish.
#13
Quote by 12345abcd3
That's not the point, the point is that you said:


Whereas being is C is perfectly possible. The E could be the dominant of Am, and the A could be borrowed from the tonic minor key (these are boths "coulds").

Anyway, TS there is nothing to say you can't sing a C# there. The thing you should think about is if you like how it sounds. If yes, then keep it, if no, then don't. Then once you have decided you can try and use theory to analyse it if you wish.

E in C major is plain wrong. g# in C major ?
#14
Quote by J-Master
E in C major is plain wrong. g# in C major ?

Did you even read what I wrote? There are tons of songs in C major with E chords, it's the dominant of the relative minor.
#15
12345abcd3 is absolutely correct. I believe such progressions are common in some Beatles songs, and in the songs "Oh Comely" by Neutral Milk Hotel and "Here in my Room" by Incubus.

There's no note that you can never use in any certain key, guys =S
#16
No, J-Master is right. Last time I used an E chord in the key of C my neighbors overheard and called the cops. Luckily they took it easy on me. At least I didn't play an F#.
#17
Quote by J-Master
this guy can't figure out his song's key, let alone that he's writing chromatic music.

The number of people who have made great music that you would deem "wrong" without knowing/considering either of those things would stagger your mind.
#18
Quote by werty22
No, J-Master is right. Last time I used an E chord in the key of C my neighbors overheard and called the cops. Luckily they took it easy on me. At least I didn't play an F#.


No, he's wrong. Play this progression: C -> E -> Am -> F -> G -> C

Sounds nice, huh?
#19
Quote by 12345abcd3
That's not the point, the point is that you said:


Whereas being is C is perfectly possible. The E could be the dominant of Am, and the A could be borrowed from the tonic minor key (these are boths "coulds").

Anyway, TS there is nothing to say you can't sing a C# there. The thing you should think about is if you like how it sounds. If yes, then keep it, if no, then don't. Then once you have decided you can try and use theory to analyse it if you wish.


A is not a diatonic chord in C minor. It seems like "Hey Joe" with only major chords. There's definitely nothing wrong with using the C# note.
#20
Any note that sounds good can be played. If you are singing a "blue note", that is not in the scale, but if it sounds good, it's okay.
Call me Andrew. It's my name.

Quote by theogonia777
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#21
Quote by timeconsumer09
No, he's wrong. Play this progression: C -> E -> Am -> F -> G -> C

Sounds nice, huh?

The police disagreed.
Last edited by werty22 at Nov 3, 2009,
#23
Quote by timeconsumer09
???

I think you missed the sarcasm in my original post. Read it again and maybe you'll find it.
#25
Quote by guitaristben
Right lets just give you chords first to each section of the song.

Intro - G/E/C/D, G/E/C

Verse - G, D, C, E, D

Chorus - G,D,A


So my question is... In the chorus i sing a notes without sharps or flats however one note i sing is a C#. It sounds right when i'm playing the chords and singing but i'm not sure if this should be a natural C. I know you might think i'm being stupid or perhaps thick, but I would appreciate it if you could help me out.

Also the key of the song is in what: G, C?


Here's my theory;

Knowing that those E's are Em, it's pretty easy to explain why a C# would sound natural over the chorus.

A key change.

The verses (G, Em, C, D) are in the key of G maj.

The chorus' (G, D, A) are in the key of D maj. D maj has a C# in it. By any chance does the C# you sing happen over the A chord?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#26
Quote by timeconsumer09
I don't get it...



I was ridiculing J-Master's notion that it's "wrong" to use an E chord in the key of C. My neighbors certainly did not actually call the police because I played a "wrong chord."
#27
Quote by werty22


I was ridiculing J-Master's notion that it's "wrong" to use an E chord in the key of C. My neighbors certainly did not actually call the police because I played a "wrong chord."


Oh. I got that was sarcasm, I thought there was supposed to be some kind of music-related joke in there.