#1
I know this probably seems like a stupid question, but don't' laugh what is the actual difference between an american tone and a british tone? which do you prefer?
http://www.youtube.com/user/heavymetal1110
My youtube channel

Epiphone Korina explorer, Fender MIM Strat, Ibanez GSA60, Ibanez AEG25
The amp: Bugera 1990
Pedals: Ibanez Tubescreamer,wylde od, wylde wah, Tc electronic g major,
#2
In my mind, which is far from infallible, the main difference is mids. British tones tend to be 'rough' and 'gritty' which is due to a big push in the mids section... American voicings are more scooped and therefore come off 'smoother.'
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#3
Quote by tubetime86
In my mind, which is far from infallible, the main difference is mids. British tones tend to be 'rough' and 'gritty' which is due to a big push in the mids section... American voicings are more scooped and therefore come off 'smoother.'


coulden't have explained it better. A lot of people also say that British voicing sounds more, raunchy and crunchy (then again it's prolly because of the slight mid bump)
#4
Well I think of it like the american tone is more aggressive and strong and the british the opposite.

I prefer something in between.
1. You're surfing the internet.
2. You're browsing through the UG forums.
3. You're reading now.
5. You didn't notice that there was no #4.
6. You just checked it.
7. Now you're having a lil smile.

Quote by hawk_kst
You Sir, have the best signature like ever!
#5
The distinction is between Marshall amps from the UK which use EL34 output valves, and Fender amps from the US which use 6L6 output valves (or tubes as the Yanks call them).
#6
Good question, good answer. Personally I like the British sound 70's hard rock sound, Sabbath, Zeppelin, Cream, Hendrix (I know not british, but had a sound cloer to that) etc.
#7
Quote by HendrixClaptonP
Good question, good answer. Personally I like the British sound 70's hard rock sound, Sabbath, Zeppelin, Cream, Hendrix (I know not british, but had a sound cloer to that) etc.

They all mainly used Marshall amps, so they all had "British" tones.
#8
Quote by HendrixClaptonP
Good question, good answer. Personally I like the British sound 70's hard rock sound, Sabbath, Zeppelin, Cream, Hendrix (I know not british, but had a sound cloer to that) etc.


Hendrix was pretty British if you ask me, Clapton is a little american/british to me (KT66 tubes)
#9
Quote by blue_strat
The distinction is between Marshall amps from the UK which use EL34 output valves, and Fender amps from the US which use 6L6 output valves (or tubes as the Yanks call them).

There are many, many deviations from this so I don't think it can be stated as a rule.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#11
Quote by unet
So a tubescreamer makes everything more British?


No lol, it's not JUST the mids, it's the feeling you get.... and some other sounds lol.
If it was i would buy a Fender Bassman right now and crank the mids and mid boost it but that's not the case of the current situation
#14
It all depends on the specific amp, really. Tweed Fenders do not have the typical American (blackface) voicing, and are generally looser. When people refer to "American Voicing" they typically mean a tighter, more focused low end with a glassy top end. When people refer to british amps, they're talking about a looser, less prevalent low end, with a high end focused lower than that of American amps.

American amps CAN be dialed to sound british, and British amps CAN be dialed to sound American. However, when overdriven, the nature of the tubes will become more prevalent, which is highlighted in an amp like the AC30 versus an amp like the Super Reverb. Using Marshall as a hallmark as 'British' tone is kinda odd to me, seeing as the Marshall amps of yore are based on a Fender bassman.
#15
Quote by unet
So a tubescreamer makes everything more British?

No matter how you boost them the mids don't seem to push the same way on American voiced amps... I have V30s in my cab so my Bassman has a good bit more mids than it would normally, but they still don't 'growl' quite like a british amp would... I don't know why that is, though.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#16
Quote by imgooley
Using Marshall as a hallmark as 'British' tone is kinda odd to me, seeing as the Marshall amps of yore are based on a Fender bassman.

But wouldn't the Tweed Bassman be considered a 'british' voicing because of this? I don't know much about Marshalls... I'm a Fender fanboi.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#17
Quote by imgooley
It all depends on the specific amp, really. Tweed Fenders do not have the typical American (blackface) voicing, and are generally looser. When people refer to "American Voicing" they typically mean a tighter, more focused low end with a glassy top end. When people refer to british amps, they're talking about a looser, less prevalent low end, with a high end focused lower than that of American amps.

American amps CAN be dialed to sound british, and British amps CAN be dialed to sound American. However, when overdriven, the nature of the tubes will become more prevalent, which is highlighted in an amp like the AC30 versus an amp like the Super Reverb. Using Marshall as a hallmark as 'British' tone is kinda odd to me, seeing as the Marshall amps of yore are based on a Fender bassman.


True, the JTM45 and even the later SLP used KT tubes, but had british made speakers which made them lean a little towards the British voicing.

But yeah like you said, the nature of the powertubes and speakers determine an amps voicing, but that doesn't mean you can get a British sound through a 6L6/6v6/KT amplifier
#18
Quote by stykerwolf
True, the JTM45 and even the later SLP used KT tubes, but had british made speakers which made them lean a little towards the British voicing.

But yeah like you said, the nature of the powertubes and speakers determine an amps voicing, but that doesn't mean you can get a British sound through a 6L6/6v6/KT amplifier

So put a green back in a tweed deluxe.

And the Soldano SLO100 uses 5881's (6l6's), and is based off Marhsall amps.
#19
To me "British" voicing is a Vox, not a Marshall. "American" voicing is a Fender.
My Gear

Fender MIM Telecaster
Ibanez Artcore AFS75T
Ibanez PF Acoustic Electric

Vox AC4TV8
Crate FXT 65

Various pedals
#20
Go to the tone testing thread MkII and you'll find everything you need to know
Quote by gregs1020
Brett has been saving for a splawn for 4 years
countries have been toppled in the time it's taking, revolutions won got a black pres

yawn


Quote by bubb_tubbs
When he finally gets one it'll probably be televised like the Berlin Wall coming down.
The end of an era