#2
I don't think so, if the screws are tight, this means they are completely down, thus pushing the strings up, so you have pretty high action

well, that's how it works on my guitar anyway, don't know about your Jackson or Squire or what your guitar is...
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#6
Quote by jkielq91
im checking if that does me its as low as it can, could have been as high lol, in which case high very low

im still getting used to my floyd




post pics of the acton at the nut 12 and 24th frets as english isn`t probably your 1st language
#7
aaah english is my first language, being english and all. the light dont work in here so its hard to see the keyboard, ill re type it. i was also blind typing very fast :P

im checking if the screw being as tight as it can go means the actions as low as it can go. or does it actually mean its as high as it can go, though i doubt that.

better?
#8
basically tightening them lowers the screws into the body, therefore lowering the bridge, which means lowering the action.
#10
Quote by jkielq91
im checking if the screw being as tight as it can go means the actions as low as it can go. or does it actually mean its as high as it can go, though i doubt that.

that depends on the type of bridge or saddles. it would help if we knew which guitar you were talking about

edit: oh yeah, i just saw a bit of info i missed..

as far as i'm aware, doesn't a floyd rose have 2 screws to adjust the whole bridge as well as some to adjust the individual saddles? normally the individual saddle screws raise the saddles when you tighten, making the action higher for that particular string, but the screws that adjust the whole bridge usually lower the action when you tighten.
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Last edited by Blompcube at Nov 3, 2009,