#1
Hi,

I'm required to learn the following scales for an audition but I found the wording a bit vague:

Technical requirements:

* All three octave scales and arpeggios up to G with all standard right hand fingerings.

I was wondering if anyone could explain to me exactly what I had to learn and maybe put me on to some sheet music.

Thanks
#2
maybe all major scales and arpeggios( A-G) in 3 different octaves? the fingerings part doesnt make much sense to me though
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#5
I'm guessing here, but I'm assuming that they want proper "classical" right hand technique.
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#6
hey man, im currently at the adelaide conservatorium, studying jazz. i didnt have to worry about right hand technique and stuff for the audition, what degree are you going for?
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#8
then it does apply to the classical aproach to technique, which i have no idea on i am afraid
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#9
Ring them and ask for clarification - that way you'll know exactly what they want, rather than guessing and possibly getting it wrong.
#10
Quote by edwarde
then it does apply to the classical aproach to technique, which i have no idea on i am afraid

On the way up the scale if you need to go out of position, you back, while on the way down, you stretch out.

eg

---------------------------------------------3--5--6
---------------------------------3---4---6----------
----------------------2--3---5-----------------------
----------------3--5---------------------------------
------3--5--6----------------------------------------
----6-------------------------------------------------

on the way up you play A on the G string. on the way down, play A on the D string (fret 7). although that scale is just 2 octaves...


is there anything else under "technical requirements"? the rest of it might give you a clue..
Last edited by mdwallin at Nov 4, 2009,
#11
Standard includes i,m; i,a; m,a; and possibly a,m,i.

Both free and rest stroke.

It's a really stupid requirement to ask for m,a and a,m,i scales at high tempos and over extended (3 octave) scales as you'll never be required to do so in practise, but there you are, somebody has set the hurdles and you must dutifully jump over them.
Last edited by R.Christie at Nov 4, 2009,
#12
3 octave scales and arpeggios are just the same scales/arpeggios that go over 3 octaves (ie. the starting note is 3 octaves lower than the note you finish on).

All scales/arpeggios means major and minor (harmonic and melodic for the scales).

Up to G is ambiguos but it could mean that they just want A, B, C, D, E, F, G (and all the relative minors). It could also mean up to 2 sharps or 2 flats, so C, G, F and Bb (and the relative minors) but tbh I'm not really sure.

Quote by R.Christie

It's a really stupid requirement to ask for m,a and a,m,i scales at high tempos and over extended (3 octave) scales as you'll never be required to do so in practise, but there you are, somebody has set the hurdles and you must dutifully jump over them.

By making someone play extended scales it means that they will know the notes in each key in higher positions. If you only asked for one scale of E then the person auditioning would never have to go out of first position, so might not know where the notes are in any other positions. Scales are useful for helping you learn the notes in higher positions.

Playing scales in lots of different keys helps you learn the notes in lots of keys. Playing at high tempos ensures that you are fluent (because chances are when you are sight reading you won't have time to think about whether that F# is one or two semitones above the E).
#13
Where can I find the sheet music for this? I already know the fretboard quite well so all I need if the sheets to tell me the right fingering and such.

Quote by mdwallin
is there anything else under "technical requirements"? the rest of it might give you a clue..


theres nothing else under technical requirements.
Last edited by GuitarGuitar at Nov 4, 2009,
#14
Quote by R.Christie
Standard includes i,m; i,a; m,a; and possibly a,m,i.

Both free and rest stroke.

It's a really stupid requirement to ask for m,a and a,m,i scales at high tempos and over extended (3 octave) scales as you'll never be required to do so in practise, but there you are, somebody has set the hurdles and you must dutifully jump over them.


This.

There is a scale study book with fingerings by Segovia. The title escapes me right now, but it's something really generic like "Diatonic Scales" or something. That's considered the 'gold standard' for classical scales. It describes both right and left-hand fingerings.

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