#1
I wonder how to practice a song with a metronome. How do I keep to the beat of the song so I don't go too fast or slow and know when to jump in. I can play some songs if the original is playing but I totally lose track of the beat and get lost.
I hope this makes sense I feel like I have alot of questions to ask about guitar and theory but just not sure what it is I need to ask
Thanks
#2
Practice with a metronome......listen to it and follow the beats. What I've found over the years playing with different musicians is that those that practiced with a metronome, kept better time. I've even played with drummers who were all over the place beat wise......and they're supposed to be your beat keepers....haha!

Another way is to learn how to play the drums.........not only does that expand your abilities of playing different instruments......it also help me to understand keeping a beat, and how the bass and rythym guitar fits into everything.
#4
Quote by Afterhours
Practice with a metronome......listen to it and follow the beats. What I've found over the years playing with different musicians is that those that practiced with a metronome, kept better time. I've even played with drummers who were all over the place beat wise......and they're supposed to be your beat keepers....haha!

Another way is to learn how to play the drums.........not only does that expand your abilities of playing different instruments......it also help me to understand keeping a beat, and how the bass and rythym guitar fits into everything.



Good advice. Let me expand on my question. For example I can play the rythum of "no more tears" (baby steps on the solo) The book I have says the tempo is 104bpm. So do I set my metronome at 104 and everytime it beeps I hit a rythum note? Well I guess it should be every time a hit a note it is on a metronome beat.
#6
Quote by shotclock
Good advice. Let me expand on my question. For example I can play the rythum of "no more tears" (baby steps on the solo) The book I have says the tempo is 104bpm. So do I set my metronome at 104 and everytime it beeps I hit a rythum note? Well I guess it should be every time a hit a note it is on a metronome beat.

Normally it will click 4 times per bar (crotchets) so divide each bar up into 4 parts, and play what's in each part in-between clicks. Try to feel when the beat's coming.
Here's a series of videos incase I suck at explaining...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1HXLBYJETg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSxbHtI7K7E
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSShOgGc23U
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4OJrBvRo3A
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XI7K7YOQpI
If you need more you can look up Subdivision on youtube or somewhere else.
#7
Quote by shotclock
Good advice. Let me expand on my question. For example I can play the rythum of "no more tears" (baby steps on the solo) The book I have says the tempo is 104bpm. So do I set my metronome at 104 and everytime it beeps I hit a rythum note? Well I guess it should be every time a hit a note it is on a metronome beat.


It would depend on the time signature and the actual musical piece you're playing.
For example, if the time signature is in 4/4......that means there's 4 "Beats" per measure, and a 1/4 note is equal to one beat. In that case, if you were playing, whether picking or strumming 1/4 notes........it would be everytime the metronome beeps.

Strumming rhythm patterns are often sycopated, in that they don't follow a strict 1,2,3,4 type rhythm...although they can. Your main focus when playing sycopated rhythms is to be sure you come down on the 1 beat. You may have an easier time playing to a simple drum track......with the kick drum hits on the 1 & 3....and the snare hits the back beats 2 & 4. This may help give you a better idea of where you are in any given measure.
#8
Can you tap your foot when you're playing/listening to music? Set the metronome and let it click where you'd normally tap your foot. Both do the same job, just the metronome is more accurate and won't subconsciously slow down for the hard bits