#1
Thanks for looking at this thread. I am trying to finish my pedal board, but I need help with some things.

My final pedal chain will look like this:

-Guitar
Korg Pitchblack
Fulltone OCD
8-bit Fuzz
EVH Wah
-Pre amp
- Effects loop send
MXR Carbon Copy
- Effects loop return
(ISP Decimator Noise Suppressor somewhere)

1.) Should the wah go there? I have the OCD and I use it and my amp's overdrive both often. If I use the Amp overdirve a little more, should the wah be first going into the effects loop return?

2.) Where should the Noise Suppressor go? I get terrible noise on high gain.

3.) All of these effects are true bypass. Will my tone suffer because of no buffering and lots of cord travel when no effects are on? Should I put a sonic stomp in the effects loop to buffer there, and a noise suppressor in the chain before the pre amp to buffer there?

Thanks!
Last edited by cccasey14 at Nov 3, 2009,
#2
I would suggest putting the noise suppressor in your effects loop. Don't worry about a buffer, you don't have enough pedals to have to worry. For the love of God, do not get a sonic stomp.

The wah goes in front of your distortion if you want a conventional sound.

What's your amp?

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#3
Quote by stradivari310
I would suggest putting the noise suppressor in your effects loop. Don't worry about a buffer, you don't have enough pedals to have to worry. For the love of God, do not get a sonic stomp.

The wah goes in front of your distortion if you want a conventional sound.

What's your amp?


Thanks for the help! I use a Traynor YCV50 BLUE. Oh, and I won't get the sonic stomp then. I've heard that it wasn't good, and hearing from a UGer assures me of that
#4
1. i'd put the wah before your od, but plenty of people do it the other way aound, depends on what you want from it.

2. in the loop before the delay.

3. how much cable are we talking about before your signal hits the amp? much more than 20' and i'd say yeah, look into something that's got a decent buffer in it. a gate will kill feedback when frontloaded, amp noise when looped.

4. there's nothing wrong with a sonic stomp, but you shouldn't use anything if you don't know what it does.
#5
Quote by GrisKy
1. i'd put the wah before your od, but plenty of people do it the other way aound, depends on what you want from it.

2. in the loop before the delay.

3. how much cable are we talking about before your signal hits the amp? much more than 20' and i'd say yeah, look into something that's got a decent buffer in it. a gate will kill feedback when frontloaded, amp noise when looped.

4. there's nothing wrong with a sonic stomp, but you shouldn't use anything if you don't know what it does.


+1

And you couldn't be more correct about #4. Never throw a pedal in your chain unless you have a full understanding of its main purpose.
#6
Quote by i_am_metalhead
+1

And you couldn't be more correct about #4. Never throw a pedal in your chain unless you have a full understanding of its main purpose.


I didn't say that I don't know what it does. I know perfectly well what it does, but I've heard that the sonic stomp is terrible compared to the rackmount versions, which I have heard.

thanks for the input though!
#7
Quote by cccasey14
I didn't say that I don't know what it does. I know perfectly well what it does, but I've heard that the sonic stomp is terrible compared to the rackmount versions, which I have heard.

thanks for the input though!


my #4 from earlier was pointed more towards the "for the love of god don't use a sonic stomp..." comment. i agree that the racks process a little smoother and faster, but the difference is pretty negligible.
#8
Quote by cccasey14
I didn't say that I don't know what it does. I know perfectly well what it does, but I've heard that the sonic stomp is terrible compared to the rackmount versions, which I have heard.

thanks for the input though!


I wasn't directing that toward you. It was meant for the guy who said "for the love of god don't get that pedal" or whatever - its pretty obvious he doesn't know what the pedal is intended for because its a very good pedal.
#9
Two the last two posts, it's no problem. I must have just misread them. Thanks for clearing that up for me!

Now a new question, does every pedal "buffer" when it is on?
#10
Quote by i_am_metalhead
I wasn't directing that toward you. It was meant for the guy who said "for the love of god don't get that pedal" or whatever - its pretty obvious he doesn't know what the pedal is intended for because its a very good pedal.

I know exactly what it's for, and I can't stand it. The sound becomes much less natural to my ears.

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#11
Quote by cccasey14
Now a new question, does every pedal "buffer" when it is on?


the short answer is yes, but it also depends on the type of effect being used.for example, the signal is not treated the same after going through an od's algorithm as it would a passive volume pedal's pot.

keep in mind that pedals have a job to do, and when you turn them on they do their job. same is true for true-bypass pedals, turn it on and it's no longer true-bypass, it's doing its job. make sense?

strad, and what exactly is a natural sound? better not use any compressors for a natural sound... no gates and downward expanders... no od pedals, the's nothing natural about components in a metal box... no EQing, that's completely unnatural...

pretty much just leaves you with an unmic'd acoustic.

sonic maximizers and hi-freq exciters have their place as does every piece of gear. just because you might not like it on wtf amp you use doesn't mean it won't work perfectly for someone else.
#12
Actually I have a noob question...

What does a Sonic Maximizer do?
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#13
Quote by ragingkitty
Actually I have a noob question...

What does a Sonic Maximizer do?


It realigns frequencies that go out of phase.
#14
Quote by ragingkitty
Actually I have a noob question...

What does a Sonic Maximizer do?


not really as much of a noob question as you might think... supprisingly few people know what it does.

ok, so, different frequencies travel at different speeds, right? as such, the different frequencies within a given tone will reach a listener at different times. although these time differences are minimal, it's enough to off set the harmonic content of the tone... or, in short, it'll lack the knot-tight low end frequencies that travel much slower than higher freq's.

perhaps the best way to think of a sonic maximizer is as a "smart" delay, holding back higher frequencies for fractions of miliseconds so that all of the tone's harmonic content reached a listener in unison.

that's not EXACTLY what happens, but it's a good general overview.

down side to using one when recording is that ic can royally fvck up your phasing if you're not careful. soundwaves normally look like this:
/\/\/\/\/\/
sonic maximizers make them look like this:
[]_[]_[]_
NOT a square LFO, but rather all of the harmonic content being delivered together. in the visual example above, the sonic maximizer's soundwave would be indicative of three attacks. hope that makes sense.
#15
Quote by i_am_metalhead
It realigns frequencies that go out of phase.


ok, i guess that would've been a much easier way of saying it.
#16
Soo is that right to say that without a Sonic Maximizer...

If I played an open E... the trebles would reach my ears first, then the mids then the bass.

Whereas with a Sonic Maximizer, all the frequencies would reach my ears at the same time?
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( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
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#17
Quote by ragingkitty
Soo is that right to say that without a Sonic Maximizer...

If I played an open E... the trebles would reach my ears first, then the mids then the bass.

Whereas with a Sonic Maximizer, all the frequencies would reach my ears at the same time?


when dialed in appropriately, yes, though they are also capable of some truely unique sounds as well.

conceptually, you got it, but it's worthwhile to point out that the results will never be the same for every set of ears in the house. that is to say that someone in the front row, who hears the SM-corrected soundwave, will most likely not hear the same thing as someone at the back of the house (not accounting for PA use). this is due to the varying wavelengths of each frequency... they'll eventually work themselves back out of alignment. and of course surface reflections will take their toll.

in a live environment, the idea is more that your audiance will hear most of your sound throught mic'd cabs-->PA anyhow, and the ones up close who are actually getting a good listen to your cab are hearing the corrected tone anyways.

in the studio it's a bit of a different beast. used too early (as in during tracking) it can ruin a mix,though it's not uncommon to apply a SM or exciter to master bus (and sometimes individual tracks) nearing the final mix.

EDIT: i might've been unclear about this before, but by "reaching your ears," i'm not saying you'll hear all bass, then all mids, then all high freqs. it's more about at what amplitude the wavelength is at, or you could say at what point it's at at it's oscilation. sound speed is a constant, but if the bass freqs hit your ears at a low amplitude whereas the treb freqs are too high, you'll of course get an inacurate representation that your tone has too much highs. that should make more sense for the science folks out there.
Last edited by GrisKy at Nov 5, 2009,
#18
Ah ok... that makes good sense.

Thanks for the explanation, Grisky.
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#19
no problem man, glad it's making sense, because i have this feeling that i did a horrid job of explaining it. ultimately it reverts back to what metalhead said, it realigns your out of phase frequencies, but the representation of that can be conveyed a number of ways. for example, say you had two (matching - for simplicity's sake) frequencies 180 degrees out of phase with a wavelength of "X." inverting the phase of one of them would put them in phase... so would delaying one of them by X/2. on a three-dimensional model, this would be portrayed as one of the wavelengths "rotating," as it were.

it's one of those things that would take me all day to explain thoroughly with words when it'd take about 30 seconds to draw a picture glad you got it though, dispite my inate ability to be confusing as ****.