#1
Well, I made a thread about a week ago asking for help with Intervals.
I think I can go on but I'm not sure if I quite understand them fully so I wanna ask you guys if I'm right.
Okay, I'm using the Crusades thread so I'm going to type my understandings like the example giving in the thread.
This being the example:
A to A Unison
A to Bb minor 2nd
A to B Major 2nd
A to C minor 3rd
A to C# Major 3rd
A to D Perfect 4th
A to Eb Diminished 5th (Also known as a Flatted 5th)
A to E Perfect 5th
A to F minor 6th
A to F# Major 6th
A to G minor 7th
A to G# Major 7th
A to A Octave

So, I've decided to write my own to see if I'm correct and I understand them.
So here are some I've wrote:
From E-
E to E Unison
E to F minor 2nd
E to F# major 2nd
E to G minor 3rd
E to G# major 3rd
E to A perfect 4th
E to A# diminished 5th
E to B perfect 5th
E to C minor 6th
E to C# major 6th
E to D minor 7th
E to D# major 7th
E to E Octave

From C
C to C Unison
C to C# minor 2nd
C to D major 2nd
C to D# minor 3rd
C to E major 3rd
C to F perfect 4th
C to F# diminished 5th
C to G perfect 5th
C to G# minor 6th
C to A major 6th
C to A# minor 7th
C to B major 7th
C to C Octave

Also, I was wonder, is it possible to start from say a Sharp note? Like F# or D#?

And I believe this is the last question I got. In the 3rd lesson "Applying them intervals" People are giving the Minor and Major 3rd to use as the examples and I was wondering, Now, I'm assuming in the lesson you play it on the E and A strings, right? If so, C is on the 8th fret of the E string, would the octave be on the 20th fret of the string? And would this apply to every note that is on the string? not the other 20th but 12 frets up, right?
#2
yeah, basically, you've got it right. just learn about enharmonic equivalents (e.g. F#/Gb). like, if you're going to say "C to A major 6th" technically C to Ab would be minor 6th, as opposed to G#. i mean, they have the same pitch, but it's a little subtlety to the rules of theory (which you should never drive yourself nuts over)

it is very possible to start on a sharp note. you do the exact same thing you would with a natural note.

and yes, you're correct about the 8th and 20th frets being an octave apart.
#3
Yes, you can start on a sharp note. All 12 notes of the chromatic scale are related to each other in intervals.

You don't have to play them on the E and A strings - you can play them on any two strings, adjacent or non-adjacent.

Yes, if you play a note then another on the same string 12 frets up then you get the octave of the original note.
#4
Quote by AeolianWolf
yeah, basically, you've got it right. just learn about enharmonic equivalents (e.g. F#/Gb). like, if you're going to say "C to A major 6th" technically C to Ab would be minor 6th, as opposed to G#. i mean, they have the same pitch, but it's a little subtlety to the rules of theory (which you should never drive yourself nuts over)

it is very possible to start on a sharp note. you do the exact same thing you would with a natural note.

and yes, you're correct about the 8th and 20th frets being an octave apart.


Oh I already know about the double notes. D# also being Eb and so on.

Thank you for all this information and thank you to Blue Strat.
#5
Quote by frets192
Oh I already know about the double notes. D# also being Eb and so on.

just make sure you understand when you use G# and when to use Ab. otherwise, go for it, dude.
#6
Quote by frets192
Oh I already know about the double notes. D# also being Eb and so on.


Sorry, we have to update this info in case anyone is reading this who doesn't understand enharmonic notes. The full example should be:

A to A Unison
A to Bb minor 2nd
A to B Major 2nd
A to B# Augmented 2nd
A to C minor 3rd
A to C# Major 3rd
A to Db Diminished 4th
A to D Perfect 4th
A to D# Augmented 4th
A to Eb Diminished 5th (Also known as a Flatted 5th["flatted"? don't you mean "flattened"?], also known as the "Devils Interval")
A to E Perfect 5th
A to E# Augmented 5th
A to F minor 6th
A to F# Major 6th
A to Gb Diminished 7th
A to G minor 7th
A to G# Major 7th
A to A Octave

Sorry to be anal, but I believe there were some important ones missed off the list. Anyway this still isn't a full list- but who uses an aumented unison?!
#7
Quote by chainsawguitar

A to Eb Diminished 5th (Also known as a Flatted 5th["flatted"? don't you mean "flattened"?], also known as the "Devils Interval")

also known as the tritone :/
#8
Quote by chainsawguitar
Sorry, we have to update this info in case anyone is reading this who doesn't understand enharmonic notes. The full example should be:

A to A Unison
A to Bb minor 2nd
A to B Major 2nd
A to B# Augmented 2nd
A to C minor 3rd
A to C# Major 3rd
A to Db Diminished 4th
A to D Perfect 4th
A to D# Augmented 4th
A to Eb Diminished 5th (Also known as a Flatted 5th["flatted"? don't you mean "flattened"?], also known as the "Devils Interval")
A to E Perfect 5th
A to E# Augmented 5th
A to F minor 6th
A to F# Major 6th
A to Gb Diminished 7th
A to G minor 7th
A to G# Major 7th
A to A Octave

Sorry to be anal, but I believe there were some important ones missed off the list. Anyway this still isn't a full list- but who uses an aumented unison?!


I have a couple Questions about this.

1 I thought E# and B# don't exist!?
2 in the lesson on intervals if those really do happen why isn't it on the lesson? The Crusades I though was the highest rated theory lesson on UG.
3 Do Augmented always come after the notes? Like, after the note of do they always remain in that place no matter what it is?
#10
Quote by frets192
I have a couple Questions about this.

1 I thought E# and B# don't exist!?
2 in the lesson on intervals if those really do happen why isn't it on the lesson? The Crusades I though was the highest rated theory lesson on UG.
3 Do Augmented always come after the notes? Like, after the note of do they always remain in that place no matter what it is?
E# is enharmonic to F, B# is enharmonic to C.

You can get double sharps and double flats too - in a diatonic scale each note is used once, so for some scales you have to use them to make the scale work.

They probably don't appear in the lesson because the person who wrote it wasn't infallible, and missed a bit out - or they thought it was more information than you needed at that level. The lessons are good, but there are going to be mistakes and/or omissions in pretty much any lesson - you just have to go through enough lessons to fill in the gaps.

A minor interval minus a semitone is a diminished interval
A perfect interval minus a semitone is a diminished interval
A minor interval plus a semitone is a Major interval
A Major interval plus a semitone is an augmented interval
A perfect interval plus a semitone is an augmented interval

The number part of the interval tells you how many notes (letters) you've passed through - so if your root is C any type of 5th interval from that will be some sort of G, any type of 7th will be some sort of B, etc
#11
Quote by frets192
2 in the lesson on intervals if those really do happen why isn't it on the lesson? The Crusades I though was the highest rated theory lesson on UG.


because it's really not important that you understand why enharmonic tones exist right now, or even at all if you just play guitar and really don't like the theory.

it's just important that you understand that they DO exist. B# and C are the same tone, as are E# and F. or Db/C or Gx (double sharp) and A. same tones, but the multiple names are needed so that certain scales and chords and whatnot can be consistent and "correct" in the theoretical sense.
guitar
amp

some pedals
#12
Quote by tegrenath
it's just important that you understand that they DO exist. B# and C are the same tone, as are E# and F. or Db/C or Gx (double sharp) and A. same tones, but the multiple names are needed so that certain scales and chords and whatnot can be consistent and "correct" in the theoretical sense.


"Db/C" wat
#13
Quote by AeolianWolf
"Db/C" wat

I think he meant Dbb/C
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#14
Quote by tegrenath
because it's really not important that you understand why enharmonic tones exist right now, or even at all if you just play guitar and really don't like the theory.

it's just important that you understand that they DO exist. B# and C are the same tone, as are E# and F. or Db/C or Gx (double sharp) and A. same tones, but the multiple names are needed so that certain scales and chords and whatnot can be consistent and "correct" in the theoretical sense.


When I first learned about enharmonic notes it seemed completely wierd to me.
The main reason for it is so that in a given 7 note scale every note has a unique letter assigned to it. THis makes it a lot easier to write the music in standard notation.
#15
Glad to see this on the front page so I didn't have to bump it.

So anyways, I ***think*** I may get it now. But I now have a questions abou the diminished and augmented ones now. Now, from what I can understand they basically are just other names, right? Like how every semi note is either a flat or a sharp but is still the same sound, right? like a rule like that applys there?