#1
So do pedals affect tone (while turned off)? If it does, will it be better if I plug my guitar (if I'm not going to use the pedal) directly to the amp?

Need help, I only have 7 months of experience with guitars... 2 months with electric ones..
#2
Most pedals that aren't true bypass will affect your tone, even when they're off, especially if you have a ton hooked up at the same time in your signal path. Even true bypass pedals will affect your tone to an extent though If you just have a few pedals, the tone loss is very miminal and may not even be noticable to your ears. Plugging straight into your amp while you're not using the pedals will keep this from happening...but its not very practical. I mean, you won't be able to change mid-song
#3
Don't worry about it for now. A lot of people play it up and it isn't always as noticeable as others make it seem. Especially if you have only been playing electric for 2 months, your ear might not notice subtle changes like that yet (though you may think you do).
Gibson Les Paul Studio
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pedals
#4
^^+1

you can also look into getting line booster, as long chains of pedals can sometimes lead to 'quieting' your signal
#5
yeah, Eyebanez is right, and there is ways to keep as true tone as possible and its actually quite simple. The shorter the cords you use to connect the pedals the better because a TRS cable have a really fast decay over long periods so if your using 10 foot cords to connect your pedals you will lose a significant amount of your lower end due to this. Also if possible try to get shielded cables as they remove noise from your circut giving you a cleaner tone.
Hope that helps somewhat? : )
#6
Quote by eyebanez333
Most pedals that aren't true bypass will affect your tone, even when they're off, especially if you have a ton hooked up at the same time in your signal path. Even true bypass pedals will affect your tone to an extent though If you just have a few pedals, the tone loss is very miminal and may not even be noticable to your ears. Plugging straight into your amp while you're not using the pedals will keep this from happening...but its not very practical. I mean, you won't be able to change mid-song

I agree........And i've heard some pedals with some $hitty buffers.
#7
on my pedalboard, i have 14 pedals, including a boss looper and a digitech flanger. only these 2 pedals have a very bad bypass, and it's a very obvious difference when you hear the guitar straight to the amp and passing through the pedals. I lose a lot of high end actually, so I'm fixing it with an EQ, but it doesn't sound as pure as it could.
moral of the story: don't get boss or digitech non-hardwire pedals, they suck your tone like a starving hooker
#8
I noticed a change in tone even when my tuner was plugged in so now I use a VHT Valvulator. It's tube buffer, yes I said buffer and pedal power supply. I use it first in the pedal chain. So far I haven't found a pedal that it won't "fix.". Run as much cheap cable as you want too. Don't know how I ever lived without it.
#9
we did the valvulator too, it almost seemed like using an elephant gun to kill a mouse. it also didn't work with every pedal we threw in there, but it did bypass everything at once and kept signal pretty clear.

i say just be smart with pedal choices, i never paid this signal problem much heed til i started running more than 5 pedals at once. now i have a pedal board i play with all the time and another i add on every once in a while. the one i play all the time uses all true bypass pedals except for my boss dd-6 and my wah, and my wah is gonna get upgraded soon.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#10
Quote by gunmyle
So do pedals affect tone (while turned off)? If it does, will it be better if I plug my guitar (if I'm not going to use the pedal) directly to the amp?
Why not try plugging straight into your amp and see if there's a difference? Then come back and tell us. Seriously, nobody here can tell you the answer.

It's something you should do every time you reconfigure your pedal board or add a new pedal. Any time something doesn't sound quite right you should do a tone check and compare it to plugging straight into the amp. It's not just the pedals but the cables as well that need to be checked. If you detect an issue then start moving up the pedal chain disconnecting a pedal and plugging your guitar in until you find the faulty link in the chain.

Quote by BobDetroit
I noticed a change in tone even when my tuner was plugged in so now I use a VHT Valvulator.
You could do the same thing with a $30 Art Tube preamp. The Magicstomp makes a good first pedal in the chain as well. It has strong output drivers.
Last edited by fly135 at Nov 4, 2009,
#12
It is called a mic preamp, but it works just fine for guitars. I have two of them I bought a long time ago. The level adjustments and range of amplification make them useful for just about anything. I've had no issues with noise when adjusted correctly. One thing that can cause noise is too low a level on the input and increasing the output level to compensate.

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/ART-Tube-MP-Studio-Mic-Preamp?sku=180581&src=3WFRWXX&ZYXSEM=0&CAWELAID=41699112
#13
If you really needed to you could get a bypass footswitch. Basically what it does is bypass all of your pedals when it's not engaged, and when you engage it, the signal goes to your pedals. So when you aren't using your pedals the signal wont even be going through them.
I have a huge fear if rays.
#14
Quote by fly135
It's something you should do every time you reconfigure your pedal board or add a new pedal. Any time something doesn't sound quite right you should do a tone check and compare it to plugging straight into the amp. It's not just the pedals but the cables as well that need to be checked.
Speak of the devil... I just found a bad cable on my pedal board tonight. It measured 1.6Kohms signal to ground and was sucking my tone.