#1
ok so I have been learning about the meaning of what song's a key is in, or what notes kinda sound good together which would be called a chord progression?, anyways lets look at C Major Scale the notes in the scale are C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C so does that mean those would be the chords that would sound good in a progression?, if I wanted to write a song or a chord or riff I would follow those notes correct?
#2
those are the notes of the scale but the chords will be C major,D minor,E minor,F major,G major,
A minor, B minor b5 (B diminished)

these are the chords that are diatonic to the scale.
#3
Thank you, you are very helpful thats what I was looking for, so would there be a pattern to determine if the chord notes would be major or minor?
#4
you can also use some accidentals if they sound good to you, but generally speaking, those notes will sound good. use those notes to find the diatonic chords using the intervals of the scale. read up on chord construction and intervals to fully understand
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#5
Quote by amicone18
Thank you, you are very helpful thats what I was looking for, so would there be a pattern to determine if the chord notes would be major or minor?

Also, based off of the Major scale, it will be Major Minor Minor Major Major Minor Diminished, but this only works for the major scale
Schecter C-1 Classic in Seethru blue <333
Schecter Damien FR
Roland AC-60 acoustic amp
Boss GE-7 EQ
Line6 Ubermetal Distortion
Sigma Dx Acoustic
#6
The intervals....or chord progression for C Major would be,

I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, vii* or C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bdim

Certain intervals resolve better into each other. Play around with different variations of intervals (chords) and you'll see what I mean.
#7
Diminished meaning flattened, like a flattened 7th? I know my major and minor scale, and also the distance between each notes, and actually figuring out how chords are constructed which is very interesting.
#8
To find the diatonic chords in any scale, just stack thirds. Meaning, take the note you want to build the scale off of, the diatonic third above that, and the diatonic third above that.

i.e. if you wanted to construct a chord in C minor with the root on Eb, you'd just stack thirds...

C D Eb F G Ab Bb

The bolded would be your chord tones, giving you an Eb major triad.

EDIT: The same rule applies to extended chords. Stack another third above for a 7th chord, another for a 9th, etc.
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Nov 4, 2009,
#9
Quote by amicone18
Diminished meaning flattened, like a flattened 7th? I know my major and minor scale, and also the distance between each notes, and actually figuring out how chords are constructed which is very interesting.


A diminished interval would be a flatted minor interval, or a flatted perfect interval. A b7 is just that, but a bb7 is a diminished 7th.
#11
this thread helped answer a question that i have wanted to know for months. thank you.
Classical Guitarist