#5
A Gsus4 can be considered a plagal cadence in miniature. Just playing with those chords, I came up with:

(#= number of beats)

AmX4 FX4 GX4 Gsus4X2 GX2

and repeat. It's an 8 bar progression, and the G->Am motion at the end constitutes a pretty little cadence. The sus4, in this case, is more of an ornamentation than anything else, and just sort of gives the progression a measure of melodicism.

You can also sub in C major for the Gsus4. It's a different sound, but you might dig it.
Quote by brownsfan456
Anything is possible with music which is sooo awesome


Quote by metal4all

I just learn the formula, apply it to a key, and use said notes on fretboard. Why? Cuz I'm not a pussy.
#8
Quote by epiphone2828
shuld i keep the progression the same the whole song


You can, but you don't have to.
Quote by brownsfan456
Anything is possible with music which is sooo awesome


Quote by metal4all

I just learn the formula, apply it to a key, and use said notes on fretboard. Why? Cuz I'm not a pussy.
#9
G to Gsus4 - the third moves up a semitone to the fourth (the B moves up to a C). The fourth could then become the third of the Am, in effect instead of being a suspension it would be an anticipation, a note that moves early in anticipation of the new chord. You could also go back to the F (which has a C in it) or to a C chord.

You could resolve it back to the G, or...

You could carry on the half tone movement up to the C♯. This would involve an interesting blend of an Am and A major tonal ambiguity.

So something like Am F G Gsus4 A.

Some might not like it but I find it quite interesting.
Si
#10
Quote by tenfold
I think the G to Gsus4 doesn't really sound good though. You should go to another chord before you hit the Gsus4.
This ^

Actually, if you just swap sequence on the G and Gsus4 it sounds better.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.