#1
In a Blues/Rock context how important is it to play the change when soloing?
#2
It's not essential. Playing the changes is mainly a bebop invention. Not to say it can't be done in a blues/rock context to great effect. but it's certainly less common.
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I just learn the formula, apply it to a key, and use said notes on fretboard. Why? Cuz I'm not a pussy.
#3
Quote by KenjiBeast
It's not essential. Playing the changes is mainly a bebop invention. Not to say it can't be done in a blues/rock context to great effect. but it's certainly less common.


So it not a big deal if you don't target a chord tone on the change?
I find sometimes the chords move so fast it's very hard to do this.
#4
Usually, I would say, it is a good idea to play the changes in rock. If you find it too hard to figure out what notes to land on, try using your ears and making up a melody in your head, then playing it, instead of using your knowledge. There's lots of solos that don't play the changes, but I think you'd find that the best solos, and the best moments in solos, are when the chord changes are paid attention to.

It's more opinion really though.
#5
Quote by statocat
In a Blues/Rock context how important is it to play the change when soloing?



In terms of good melodic practice, genre is irrelevant


What you should ask yourself is......How important is it to you to learn?


Now it takes time, so there is nothing wrong with using your ear and scale patterns you are comfortable with, as you continue to learn the theory.


There is also nothing wrong with simply playing by ear.

but again you have to ask yourself...... what's important to you? what are your goals?
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 5, 2009,
#6
in a band, regradless of genre, you must play as a group.

letting the drummer keep the tempo while you completly ignore it isnt really going to sound that good.

letting someone play rhythm while you completly ignore what chords they're playing or what key they are in isnt really going to sound good either.


now of course once you know what you're supposed to do, you can break the rules, but a knowledge of how to do it "properly" is, in my opinion, required.


Edit: rephrasing
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at Nov 5, 2009,
#7
Playing through the changes is an element used in a lot of jazz. If done properly, it adds a level of complexity in the sound.
#8
If you aren't playing the changes, what would you play?

I'm not asking to be a smart ass. As mentioned above you should be playing as a group which means playing with the other members. The chord changes, bass line, melody, and percussion line will all be factors in what you play during your solo. Without this frame work then you are simply playing by yourself. Music is about communication. You wouldn't start talking about politics if some one asked you for the time of day.

You will have more leeway if the changes are quick. In this case it becomes less of an issue to strongly articulate or outline the notes of a particular chord. However, if you are resolving a phrase it is mandatory that you resolve with a note from the chord or an implied note (meaning a note that would be part of the extended harmony like a 7th, 9th, 13th etc...)

In the long run it is much more important to listen than to "think" about what to play. Listen and play what you hear, and you will NEVER make a mistake.

LL
http://www.yourguitarist.com/blog
http://www.LLStrangelove.com
Last edited by Lou Lombardi at Nov 5, 2009,
#9
Quote by Lou Lombardi


In the long run it is much more important to listen than to "think" about what to play. Listen and play what you hear, and you will NEVER make a mistake.



Wow, I have to say, that's some of the best advice I've ever heard at this forum.
shred is gaudy music