#1
hey guys,
It's a long time since I've been here. I recently bought a new guitar and got rid of my bass. Because I like playing the guitar more then bass.
I learned the pentatonic, and I can improvise within it. I also can add extra notes on feeling/hearing. But I don't know any other music theory. I play mostly blues a la Jimi Hendrix. But I can't figure out what I should learn next. I feel like I am in a box of restricted notes (the pentatonic scale) where I can't get out. What should I learn next? I was thinking of modes, but I think my theory is too poor to put them in solo's.
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#3
Add the missing notes that are taken out from a pentatonic scale and then you have an octatonic scale/major scale. Change the pattern of whole steps and half steps from the major scale and you have the minor scale. Change the number of sharps or flats and you have a different scale altogether.
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#4
I know the major and minor scale, not that good. probably because I don't use them that often. Maybe I'll take a look at them and forget about the pentatonic for a week.

And, most of the time I play on feeling/hearing, I get much critique for that, but I also get to hear that I play very well. Is it that bad to know little theory about what you are doing? Is it going to affect my playing on long term? Should I start learning theory or just follow my feeling/ears?
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#5
Quote by Konkordmusk
Add the missing notes that are taken out from a pentatonic scale and then you have an octatonic scale/major scale. Change the pattern of whole steps and half steps from the major scale and you have the minor scale. Change the number of sharps or flats and you have a different scale altogether.


The major scales is diatonic, which is a type of heptatonic scale. Octatonic scales have 8 notes (you only count the tonic once) and don't have much place outside of death metal and jazz leads.
#6
Quote by noxios
I know the major and minor scale, not that good. probably because I don't use them that often. Maybe I'll take a look at them and forget about the pentatonic for a week.

And, most of the time I play on feeling/hearing, I get much critique for that, but I also get to hear that I play very well. Is it that bad to know little theory about what you are doing? Is it going to affect my playing on long term? Should I start learning theory or just follow my feeling/ears?


Theory will explain what you are doing, and so repeat it and help you work quicker in future.
You might want to check out this months guitar techniques (December issue) It's got a great article by Guthroe Govan called "Supercharge your playing" - one of the quotes below is "Do you worry that your playing is to heavily reliant on a limnited repetoire of pentatnoic cliches? Fear not: Help is at hand".

It has lots of great ideas for combing parts of other scales to your pentatonic licks.
#7
Quote by noxios
Should I start learning theory or just follow my feeling/ears?


You should follow your ears. Theory does not tell you what to play. Theory just tells you what to name (the technical aspects not the song name) what you are playing. It should also help you be able to confidently play and be able to play exactly what you hear in your head, the first time you try (technical abilities permitting).
#8
learn all five positions of the pentatonic, then you'll be able to solo around the entire neck.
#9
Contrary to some people's beliefs, the pentatonic scale is not just that one fingering. You can play it all over the neck. Instead of learning just the shape, try learning the notes/intervals that make up the pentatonic scale and you'll feel less restricted.

Also, try learning the Minor scale, and the Major Pentatonic
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#10
Quote by foofightin3
learn all five positions of the pentatonic, then you'll be able to solo around the entire neck.


Its more worth your while to learn the full major and minor scales, rather than just the pentatonic versions. Its alot easier to just drop two of the notes from the major scale, than to add two to the major pentatonic. The major scale is also a whole lot more useful in terms of harmony.