#1
When I used to take lessons, my guitar teacher said something like every major scale has it's own minor scale that can be played and vice versa. He also taught me away to find the minor scale for the major scale in the key I was playing but I forgot how to do it.

For example, how can I find the corresponding minor scale for the G major scale?

I looked at the sticky thread for scales but since I stopped playing guitar for a while I was kind of confused because I don't remember all of the terms lol

I hope my explanation was clear enough and thanks in advance for the help
#2
the corresponding minor scale is called the relative minor. To find it you go down a 3rd or up a 6th (either way it's the same thing) in the case of G Major the relative minor would be E Minor. Hope thats helpful
#3
Major Scale: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

|-0-|-0-|---|---|
|---|-0-|---|-0-|
|-0-|---|-0-|-0-|
|-0-|---|-0-|-0-|
|-0-|-0-|---|-0-|
|---|-0-|---|-0-|

Minor Scale: 1 2 3b 4 5 6b 7b

|-0-|---|-0-|-0-|
|-0-|-0-|---|-0-|
|-0-|---|-0-|---|
|-0-|---|-0-|---|-0-|
|-0-|---|-0-|-0-|
|-0-|---|-0-|-0-|

#4
Its called the relative minor. For G major it would be E minor. write out the notes for each of these and you will understand why. To find it out just go four frets down, so from
3rd fret = G (major) then open string = E (relative minor)
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#5
ive never taken lessons and im probably not gonna help you but i found if you take the major scale if you know it and instead of playing the fourth you play the third it becomes minor. this is probably not the whole story but i think it works. please tell me if im wrong because id hate to tell someone false information and id also like to know myself
#6
It's simple. The notes in every major scale follow the same pattern. The first note is root note. The next note is a whole step up (that's two notes). It's usually abbreviated to "W". That note is an "A" for you. The whole pattern is as follows:

W W H W W W H

"H" is short for half step. So, the notes in the G Major scale are:

W W H W W W H
G A B C D E F# G

Note the interval length in between each note.

Now, for the natural minor for every major scale. It's the sixth inverval. So the natural minor for G major would be E Minor.


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#7
Nergal has it!Every major scale has a relative minor, what that means is that those 2 scales actually have the same notes. So take G major for example; you know that that scale goes
G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G. So the relative minor is always the 6th note of the major scale, in this case E. So an E minor scale goes;
E,F#,G,A,B,C,D,E
Try playing those 2 scales, its amazing, that the same notes, in different orders really changes the sound, and is infact the very basic concept of modes.
#8
idk if you figured it out, but because E minor is the 6th scale degree in G major, all you have to do is play the 6th position scale of G major, and you have the E minor scale! (this goes for all other scales)
#9
A minor scale is formed by lowering the third, sixth, and seventh. G minor is the parallel minor of G major, and contains the notes G A B♭ C D E♭ F.

The relative minor is the minor scale that contains the same notes as a major scale. It can be found by resolving the major scale to the sixth instead. As thus, the scales have a different tonic, and different intervals, and cannot be used interchangeably.

Quote by YourMasterIsMe
ive never taken lessons and im probably not gonna help you but i found if you take the major scale if you know it and instead of playing the fourth you play the third it becomes minor. this is probably not the whole story but i think it works. please tell me if im wrong because id hate to tell someone false information and id also like to know myself


You're using improper terminology. If you change the note that's four semitones up from the tonic to the one that is three semitones up, you will get a minor scale (although you also should lower the notes that are 9 and 11 semitones up from the tonic). You should not, however call this changing the fourth to the third. Third refers to the third scale degree, which is actually four semitones up. Read some theory lessons for further help.