#1
Hey guys, I was wondering what common scales, progressions or chords are in viking and or folk metal music.
Guitar/bass/mandolin stuff:
PRS SE Custom 24
PRS SE Paul Allender
Martin DCX1E
Squire Start
Memphis Bass
Johnson Savannah mando

Amp/effects/misc:
Digitech RP1000
Line 6 Spider Valve 212
Toneport Studio KB37


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#3
Quote by timeconsumer09
Why don't you just analyze some viking and or folk metal music and find out yourself?


Because it is easier to ask on here in the case of someone actually knowing the awnser to his question.
#4
Quote by ShredHead396
Because it is easier to ask on here in the case of someone actually knowing the awnser to his question.



Yes, but does that accomplish anything?


To the TS, do what timeconsumer suggested and analyze some songs.
#5
I'll tell you this: The scales isn't what you need to be concerned about. They're probably just major or minor with some alterations. Just look at the chord progressions and you'll be able to fairly easily figure the rest out from there. Plus, by analyzing it on your own, you can find out what makes certain songs jump out at you, what you really like about them. Then you can use those elements in your own songs!
#7
there's such a thing as viking folk metal?? LMAO!!! I don't know the music maybe it's really cool but they need to relabel their sub-genre it sounds absurd.
Si
#8
rules of folk metal

-its in natural minor, but avoid the 6th at all costs

-triplet feel the notes a little bit (dotted 8th note -> 16th note kind of pattern)

-if you start on the tonic, play it twice.

-most chord progressions are just the tonic and the subtonic, however as long as your stay within the natural minor (AND AVOID THE 6TH...[although it works in some cases, but not for folky effect])

-end on the tonic, or around the tonic as in subtonic -> tonic, or subtonic -> super tonic -> tonic.

starting on the dominant is a good idea and alternating between 2 notes in the pickup measure is a good idea too.

btw look at gnarly fantasy pics of like wood elf rangers n shit to get in the folk metal mood
#9
^Best be trollin'
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key
#10
mixolydian is used a lot but its more about phrasing than actual scales.use the natural minor a lot
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#11
Quote by Elden G20
^Best be trollin'

His post looked pretty spot on to me. Go listen to some Finntroll, you'll see what he means.

lol Finntrollin
Last edited by Beserker at Nov 26, 2009,
#12
Well, I know folk progressions are pretty common and regular. Just your I IV V sort of thing mostly. But metal is usually avoids non-implied chord progressions and uses powerchords and riffs, which only sort of imply a progression.

How the two combine is beyond me, so I'll leave that to you, OP.
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#13
Don't a lot of folky songs start on the V chord of a major key?
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Last edited by turtlewax at Nov 27, 2009,
#14
Quote by Beserker
His post looked pretty spot on to me. Go listen to some Finntroll, you'll see what he means.

lol Finntrollin


My apologies. lol @ Fintroll, are they serious? This is as absurd as pirate metal..
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key
#15
Quote by Elden G20
My apologies. lol @ Fintroll, are they serious? This is as absurd as pirate metal..

They are serious, actually I really like them. Great drinking music. They're pretty much the quintessential folk/pirate/viking metal band too. Here's an example (mixed with LOTR footage for awesome effect )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtRwaMDggEQ

So actually they're using the major scale a lot. I don't think it's most important to talk about the main scales being used though, but rather how they are used. One obvious thing is that there's a lot of rapid "down a 4th, back to root note, repeat" basslines (you know what I mean? There's probably a proper name, it's common in a lot of music) being used.

And have some more Finntroll for good luck, because they own.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGywo81G6lk
#16
Quote by Beserker
They are serious, actually I really like them. Great drinking music. They're pretty much the quintessential folk/pirate/viking metal band too. Here's an example (mixed with LOTR footage for awesome effect )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtRwaMDggEQ

So actually they're using the major scale a lot. I don't think it's most important to talk about the main scales being used though, but rather how they are used. One obvious thing is that there's a lot of rapid "down a 4th, back to root note, repeat" basslines (you know what I mean? There's probably a proper name, it's common in a lot of music) being used.

And have some more Finntroll for good luck, because they own.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGywo81G6lk


Thanx man, not really my genre but good to see some different styles , I got shown a band Alestorm the other day, this is pretty similar. And true, the major scale can sound metal, its all to do with context. My main drinking music would prob still be Deep purple though peace man
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key