#1
If I was to invest in a Floyd Rose, would there be any point in getting a single locking? Or should I just get a double locking? Double seems like too much of a hassle in restringing and such. But I don't know.
#2
without the neck lock, it would go out of tune very easily after you massively wank the tremolo
#3
you could get single lock if u had locking tuners and it would be ok
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Quote by Punkismygod
U sure u want a floydrose? those things will make your nerves explode
#4
Yeah I had a single locking it didn't go out of tune as much as I thought it would but it was falling apart so quality was down on mine. Just play it safe and get a double I reckon.
#5
When you say single locking do you mean a non locking nut or a non locking bridge?
#6
he means non locking nut
pro tools operator certified
agile in-ceptor 727
gibson:les-paul studio
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ibanez:prestiege s2170se s520ex
esp:ec-1000vb
splawn nitro kt88s
genz-bends g-flex

Quote by Punkismygod
U sure u want a floydrose? those things will make your nerves explode
#7
get a double-locking. after the first or second restring, it's not that bad. and if you really can't get it down, you can just take the locking pads out...
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#8
A single locking one would just be a strat trem. The only thing that a Floyd over a strat trem is the fine tuners which are needed in order to use the locking nut. The locking nut isn't the problem people have with Floyds, it's the floating nature.
#9
Quote by selkies
he means non locking nut


Actually there are some single locking bridges where the strings just pass through the intonation bit, I'll get a pic up in a second to show you.



See how the string passes through it



Ball end of the string gets stuck there and you can't pull it any further and it does not lock at all but it does at the nut so there you have a single locking floyd rose.
Last edited by azn_guitarist25 at Nov 8, 2009,
#10
TS, the restinging issues aren't really with the fact that the bridge locks, but that it's a floating trem. Unfortunately, that can only be solved by blocking your trem, or not using a Floyd.
7-String Legion
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Justice4AllOne pretty much mentioned all of my ideas so yeah...pointless pun post.

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Thanks fer settin me straight on that Justice

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I was thinking that too, Justice usually seems like a pretty knowledgeable guy.
#11
Quote by selkies
he means non locking nut
Specifically, I'm talking about a FR system with a locking nut, but not a locking bridge. I can see how only locking the bridge can be problematic. But if I just lock the nut, is that ok?
#12
Quote by 1nSingularity
Specifically, I'm talking about a FR system with a locking nut, but not a locking bridge. I can see how only locking the bridge can be problematic. But if I just lock the nut, is that ok?

There's no such thing. The locking refers to a stopping point where there is no possible way that the string can move. All bridges are locking since the strings are locked in place by the ball end and cannot move. Locking tuners lock the string in place so they can't move. Same with locking nuts. If you tie a knot at the end of the string so it can't move through the tuning peg, it's locked. Get my point? Those are extra locking mechanisms but the string is always locked at the bridge no matter what type. On a Floyd, the only reason you have to manually lock the strings into the saddle is for the fine tuners. The fine tuners are needed to get the tuning perfect once you lock the nut. The only thing different about a FR than a regular trem is the locking nut and fine tuners which work together. They have the same range as other trems, the only difference is that the strings are much shorter because of the locking nut and that gives makes the what you do on the trem more radical. Locking the strings in the bridge on FR's is what keeps them in the saddle. If they're not locked, the string is not in the bridge. If you're asking about this, you probably shouldn't get a FR or you need to do a lot more research. A single-locking FR is just a FR without a locking nut. The FR is a double-locking trem. If you don't lock it at the nut, it'll operate like a strat trem. Changing strings on a FR is pretty much physically the same as on a fixed bridge or on a string through bridge. You just need about 5 seconds to extra to unlock nut and bridge. The part that people complain about is getting it in tune once you install the strings or retuning it.
#13
Quote by JELIFISH19
There's no such thing. The locking refers to a stopping point where there is no possible way that the string can move. All bridges are locking since the strings are locked in place by the ball end and cannot move. Locking tuners lock the string in place so they can't move. Same with locking nuts. If you tie a knot at the end of the string so it can't move through the tuning peg, it's locked. Get my point? Those are extra locking mechanisms but the string is always locked at the bridge no matter what type. On a Floyd, the only reason you have to manually lock the strings into the saddle is for the fine tuners. The fine tuners are needed to get the tuning perfect once you lock the nut. The only thing different about a FR than a regular trem is the locking nut and fine tuners which work together. They have the same range as other trems, the only difference is that the strings are much shorter because of the locking nut and that gives makes the what you do on the trem more radical. Locking the strings in the bridge on FR's is what keeps them in the saddle. If they're not locked, the string is not in the bridge. If you're asking about this, you probably shouldn't get a FR or you need to do a lot more research. A single-locking FR is just a FR without a locking nut. The FR is a double-locking trem. If you don't lock it at the nut, it'll operate like a strat trem. Changing strings on a FR is pretty much physically the same as on a fixed bridge or on a string through bridge. You just need about 5 seconds to extra to unlock nut and bridge. The part that people complain about is getting it in tune once you install the strings or retuning it.


Floyd Rose II is a lower end version of the Original Floyd used mostly on import and mid-range instruments. Originally, Floyd IIs were single locking, locking only at the nut.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floyd_Rose#Models_and_varieties

Single locking floyd roses can be locked at the nut only

edit:

Think of it like this you have a normal nut and a locking nut (strat bridge and double locking floyd rose bridge) now in the normal nut you would be easily able to slide a string through no problems but if you were insert a ball end onto that string eventually it will no longer slide through, will that make it a locking nut now?
Last edited by azn_guitarist25 at Nov 8, 2009,
#15
Can't you just buy nut locks or whatever they're called and add them on ?
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#16
Quote by falconthefirst
Can't you just buy nut locks or whatever they're called and add them on ?


wat
#17
I have a speedloader on my Ibanez and a locking nut. Even though it's single locking now, I don't have any problems. As far as a non locking nut, Get good tuners, string them correctly, and lube the nut. You may have to do some bending after divebombing to pull the strings back in tune.