#1
hey. wat up? i've been playing a while long enough to pick up some useful skills such as i can learn songs easy. pick up riffs quickly and learn by ear (sort of) any way ive notice i had gaps in my knowledge so i've started getting into a lot of theory. first off what is a minor 3rd note? also i learned (i call it the formula really i just learned how to connect all the pentatonic scales together) how to shred (kinda) but what i want is advise for improv. i wanna be able to play along with any song and just make my random jams go with the song. i do a music thing for school and well sometimes we can't find tabs for solos for songs so we have to make our own. what is a good tip for making a solo? any insight would help

this a Q&A thread so if you have a a question or need some help? ask and someone will most likely help you.
#2
Minor Third
a minor third is a distance from another note. It is exactly 3 semitones.

Finding a minor third from C:
You can work it out two ways.
Way 1.
Here is the C Major Scale
C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C
Count up three from C.
C, D, E,
This makes a MAJOR third because it is in the MAJOR scale an sounds happy
To find the MIINOR third you flatten the note one semitone. making Eb

Major third from C = E
Minor third from C = Eb

Way 2.
Count 3 semitones up.
C, Db, D, Eb

you will have to make sure the letter is still right, though. A minor third from C (in theory) is NOT D#.

Soloing with the pentatonic scale

You will need to use your ear to find the key and quality of the song.
The quality is usually easiest. Is it happy or sad? minor/major

Listen to the bass. It will usually be thumping on the root note of each chord. The chords will resolve on the 'I Chord' which will also tell you the key of the song.

If the I chord is C Major the key will be C major and you use the C Major Pentatonic Scale. If the I chord is B minor the key is B min and use the B min pentatonic.
Basically find the right pentatonic scale that sounds right over the song.

Although it is really handy and does not take much time to learn the WHOLE major scale. Every scale derives from the Major scale (including the pentatonic, which is just like a shorter/safer version). Once you know the major scale you know (or can find) ALL!
Last edited by mdwallin at Nov 8, 2009,
#3
i know that but how is it different from a whole or half step?
i know that from C to D is a whole step
and that from D to Db is a half step
what is a minor third?
#5
Quote by angel6746
i know that but how is it different from a whole or half step?
i know that from C to D is a whole step
and that from D to Db is a half step
what is a minor third?

in western music there are 12 notes in a chromatic scale.
the spacing between each note is a half step.
the space between every two notes is a half step.
a minor third is 3 half steps from a root note.
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#6
ok kool thanks. improv is next. any ideas? some ppl say that i should just mess around with the scales. but the thing is as u all may know that scales dont sometimes work in certain genres of songs. lets say metalcore for example. any ideas or tips?
#7
Quote by angel6746
ok kool thanks. improv is next. any ideas? some ppl say that i should just mess around with the scales. but the thing is as u all may know that scales dont sometimes work in certain genres of songs. lets say metalcore for example. any ideas or tips?

tends to use harmonic minor.
Lots of chord tones in solos
Lots of arpeggios (broken chords)
#8
ahh harmonic minor. arpeggios are usefull. chord tones in solos? explain that tidbit
#9
Quote by angel6746
ahh harmonic minor. arpeggios are usefull. chord tones in solos? explain that tidbit

for example
If you are playing over a chord prog that goes
C |F |G |C

You would make sure you play some of the notes in each chord

C= C, E, G
F= F, A, C
G= G, B, D
#10
ok thanks. ur smart! hahah ur like the only one to have posted a response. anyway improv kinda falls under soloing. so what is an interval? i see that term used a lot.
#11
Quote by angel6746
ok thanks. ur smart! hahah ur like the only one to have posted a response. anyway improv kinda falls under soloing. so what is an interval? i see that term used a lot.

an interval is the space between two notes

We are going to use G Major for this example.

G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G

Intervals are generally minor/major and than a number. Quality, then space, respectively.

Basic intervals.

Min2nd
Maj2nd A

Min3rd
Maj3 B

Perfect 4th C
Perfect 5th D

min6th
Maj6th E

min7th
Maj7th F#

Perfect Octave. G

all the intervals not with a note are 'minor intervals' and not in the G Major scale. To make the interval 'minor' you flatten it a semitone.

as a practise you could fill in the other intervals.
Last edited by mdwallin at Nov 8, 2009,
#12
Thirds and sixths are the notes that make music "pretty." 4ths and 5ths add color. minor is sad (mostly) and major is happy (mostly). If you don't plan on studying music or having intellectual musical conversations, you don't really need to understand classical theory. Whatever you can understand that helps you and your bandmates works. When it comes to soloing, play what you feel and what you hear in your head will eventually work it's way into your playing with enough experience and doodling with your guitar. I don't shred because i think that it is pointless and it isn't what i feel, but to others it is. Am I making any sense?
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#13
ok i get sorta. but over all great stuff thanks.
so yeah intervals are crazy and soloing is heart felt... deep stuff hahaha
anyway next are arpeggios. there are so many and some sound kinda wack? what is a good place to start for arpeggios?
#14
The major scale.

Arpeggios are just sequences of chord tones, so learn the major scale and learn how to construct chords.
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#16
each chord has a formula that uses the intervals based on the root note of the major scale

for example

major: 1 3 5 if you go to the 3rd fret (G)on the low E string, and you use the major scale shape to count out the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd note of that scale, those would be the notes that create G major. although since the 3 and the 5 are both on the A string, you would need to use notes from the second octave in the scale.

minor: 1 b3 (flat 3) 5 same as before but when you reach the 3rd note, lower it a half step to make it flat

major7: 1 3 5 7 same idea, also notice how the name relates to the notes used

this website should explain what you need to know about intervals and chord formulas etc
http://www.guitarnoise.com/lesson/a-study-on-intervals/

take special note of the interval diagram to be able to visualize the concept better
Last edited by Themann810 at Nov 8, 2009,
#17
Quote by TK1
in western music there are 12 notes in a chromatic scale.
the spacing between each note is a half step.
the space between every two notes is a half step.
a minor third is 3 half steps from a root note.


What you guys keep refering too as a "half-step" is a semitone, and a "whole step" is a tone.

Maybe I missed what the second post had edited to it, but you basically asked a question that was already in the post.
#19
ok this is all great. enough of these questions. here is a good questions. personally what do u think is the most usefull piece of theory? how is it used or applied to a piece of music?
#21
Quote by angel6746
ok this is all great. enough of these questions. here is a good questions. personally what do u think is the most usefull piece of theory? how is it used or applied to a piece of music?

as said.. intervals.

It teaches you scales, chord construction, chord progressions, impro, what will/won't work...

It's pretty.... it.
#22
ah true... ok. for those shredders out there what is ur fav solo to play along with a band. skill level. AND WHY is it good to learn? the person who replies after has to comment on the previous song and name one another solo and song. it works kinda like a what are u listening to thread but its more for helping those find a good solo to help build their skills in soloing. i'll start. bark at the moon. ozzy osbourne. the climbdown is a good way to pick up a little scale working by using speed to carve ur way through the scale. and the fast riff at the end of the solo really makes u work for the speed and accuracy.
#23
Quote by angel6746
bark at the moon. ozzy osbourne. the climbdown is a good way to pick up a little scale working by using speed to carve ur way through the scale. and the fast riff at the end of the solo really makes u work for the speed and accuracy.



I think it is a good solo. It's great for putting scale shapes and things into practise.

now for my turn:

I'm going to ignore the 'metal heads only' as that rules out quite a bit of MT

I like the solo in Guns 'n' Roses - Sweet Child of Mine
There is a section good for beginners and a section for the more intermediate.

there first bit, is good for getting your bends in tune. This section starts at about 1:30 through the song.

The last bit is good for building speed and accuracy, and helps you learn about chord tones, and what notes you can use to bend up to them. Also about different phrasing techniques, showing you don't have to be fast to make a great memorable part of the solo. (fast bit starts at 3:15 or so, but there is a greater slower bit before that.)
Last edited by mdwallin at Nov 10, 2009,