#1
After searching the web for different practice regimes, I've noticed a lot of them say to take a day off in between.
I've never gone a day without praticing a little bit (albeit, sometimes not focusing), but I'm wondering whether taking a day between practices "improves" the rate of learning, or should I continue practicing (properly now )?

I mean, I think that the day off is to avoid injury to the hands/fingers, but if there is a benefit technique-wise, I'll definitely take some time off!
Any thoughts?

Thanks guys/gals!
Quote by strat0blaster
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#2
Quote by sTarbuck

I mean, I think that the day off is to avoid injury to the hands/fingers, but if there is a benefit technique-wise, I'll definitely take some time off!
Any thoughts?

Oh gimme a break, it's not like practicing guitar means going to the gym everyday and lifting 100kg on the bench!

The answer is, plain and simple - no! The more time you put into it, the more you'll benefit.
#3
I don't think it would have massive benefit in reality.

That said:

It could, in theory, give your 'muscle memory' a chance to work its magic, so that patterns become consolidated in your brain...

Also, taking a break now and again can allow you to come back refreshed and inspired...


What might be better is have an 'every other day' intensive practice regime, then have the days inbetween for just messing about, playing easy stuff etc.
#4
i generally play monday to friday then take saturday and sunday off then on monday i seem to sound amazing by my low standards
#5
Quote by lockdown91
Oh gimme a break, it's not like practicing guitar means going to the gym everyday and lifting 100kg on the bench!

The answer is, plain and simple - no! The more time you put into it, the more you'll benefit.


Not always, if you take a break from practice sometimes you come up with newer ideas in your head. All guitarist should take breaks because it stops you from getting in a rut with your playing. Practice by all means but its more effective to create a practice routine where you go through all the skills and then do some inpro. Then after a few weeks if it becomes easy make the routine part harder.
It's all about patience though things do just click after a while and you will be able to do it but dont force yourself.
#6
It's nice taking a break... you f**k with something for a while sometimes and you get worse as you get tired... physically and mentally. Go back to it the next day or whatever and it comes way easier. For me anyway.
"When sh*t becomes valuable, the poor will be born without assholes."
#7
you dont have to not play on your breaks, just dont go through your practice regiment. For example, work on scales and modes for a few hours one day (and improvise a little), the next day learn to play Higher Ground by the chili peppers, the next day go back to work on the scales. It's about avoiding ruts, and giving your muscles time to "do something else" so they don't only remember the few patterns you have been working on.
#8
I would tend to say playing a little often is the best practice regime to get into and if you want to play more then do (just don't over do it) and if you don't then ... don't.

Taking a break every now and then isn't gonna do any harm and might as others have said it might help you come up with new ideas or make you regain your motivation to play/practice.

As to using breaks to avoid injury, i would think its more likely that your playing too much and thats you need to reduce the amount your practice. Also if your doing a long practice session take short breaks between sections of your routine.
"All I'm gonna do is just go on and do what I feel." - Jimi Hendrix


#9
Thanks a lot guys!

Okay, another related question that may be stupid. (In fact, probably is stupid!)

How "beneficial" is learning songs compared to learning techniques?
By that, I mean that if I were making music (and of course, I intend to at some stage), in what ways does learning songs benefit that process?
I feel like I've neglected that part of playing quite badly, as I tend to just sit, do some exercises, and feel like I'm not getting anywhere with them (I don't see any real improvement in my playing).

EDIT - Also, again in regards to playing songs, is it best to learn them solely through listening to them and figuring it out, or a balance of that + tabs/sheet music?
Quote by strat0blaster
HA!

Well played, my friend.

I'm going to edit that awful grammar right now


Yay, I'm sigged!!
And a grammar nazi..
Last edited by sTarbuck at Nov 8, 2009,
#10
Instead of thinking about it as practicing, how about you just play for the pure enjoyment of it? Do you really love music and playing the guitar, or are you going to make playing a chore? When you hear a song you want to learn, learn it. If you need polishing up on a certain technique, either write something that heavily uses that technique, or learn a pre-existing song that does. Learn as much theory as possible, and train your ear by learning as much of a song as possible by ear before turning to tabs. Try to get more by ear every time. You're putting too much thought into this. JUST PLAY.
Last edited by i_don't_know at Nov 8, 2009,
#11
^I think the best is mixture of both. If you only practice and don't play..then what are you practicing FOR? If you only play and don't practice, you won't improve as fast as you're not giving yourself the opportunity to take something your not good at enough yet, and really work on it.

Regarding days off - I don't think a day off between every practice is necessary or advisable, but 1 or 2 days off per week is good to give your hands a break, and mentally to let things sink in. I think SEALSniper1152 gave good advice about alternating between practice where you have to focus intensely, and more laid back days, and in general mixing it up.
#12
Getting enough sleep is just as effective.
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#13
sometimes you can over do it then become stuck in a rut

a day off occasionally can give your brain time to absorb some new inspiration
#14
Quote by se012101
^I think the best is mixture of both. If you only practice and don't play..then what are you practicing FOR? If you only play and don't practice, you won't improve as fast as you're not giving yourself the opportunity to take something your not good at enough yet, and really work on it.


If you just play to play, you'll want to expand your abilities naturally from time to time due to your inability to play certain songs or use a technique effectively in your own songs. As a result, you'll seek help and improve your playing whenever you need it. Trust me, this is the approach I've taken since the start, and I've gotten pretty good in under a year. Guitar is like anything else - the more you do it, the better you'll get. Don't set a schedule and turn it into a chore, but don't do the same thing every day, and you will improve.

I'm not sure how relevant this is, but taking lessons is good for theory and finding pieces to play when you would otherwise be lost. Also, your teacher can point out flaws in your technique. That's it though. Don't treat it like a school subject, it's just there for guidance. The playing relies solely on your love of music and guitar. When you need an exercise, try to write one of your own. Make everything you do push you further along your own path, rather than boring you to death to the point where you start putting together practice schedules.
#15
Taking a day off it lets you relax. Also its especially help you want a life, instead of being locked in your room forcing yourself to play.
#17
Quote by i_don't_know
If you just play to play, you'll want to expand your abilities naturally from time to time due to your inability to play certain songs or use a technique effectively in your own songs. As a result, you'll seek help and improve your playing whenever you need it. Trust me, this is the approach I've taken since the start, and I've gotten pretty good in under a year. Guitar is like anything else - the more you do it, the better you'll get. Don't set a schedule and turn it into a chore, but don't do the same thing every day, and you will improve.


I think we're saying more or less the same thing. Play, but when you encounter something that you can't do well enough, don't just move on to something else, practice that fu*ker, if necessary a lot.
#18
Quote by se012101
I think we're saying more or less the same thing. Play, but when you encounter something that you can't do well enough, don't just move on to something else, practice that fu*ker, if necessary a lot.


Yeah, we're saying the same thing.