#1
I'm just trying to think of some general examples that anybody could offer me. For the .midi, about 45 seconds in, and in the Guitar Pro, measure 12. I added 3rd harmonizing on the second go of the riff, and I think it sounds pretty good, but I'm trying to think of ways to make it sound less generic. And while it's still rough, if anybody could offer me ways to spice what I have written so far, I'd appreciate it.
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darkesthourripoff.gp4
darkesthourripoff.mid
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#2
If you use 4ths to harmonize you get a very interest almost middle eastern type sound. What you have is good just a tad generic. Experiment with harmonizing single note lines in 4ths and 5ths (which inverted are the same things as 4ths) and see what happens
#3
Thirds are the really nice, kind of true harmonies.
Fourths are nice and meaty and sound almost as good as thirds.
Fifths are meaty too but the harmony may be too high for your liking.
Tritone harmony usually doesn't work, but if you pull it off, it can sound nicer than a fourth or fifth.

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#4
3rds and 6ths are the standbys. 4ths and 5ths are boring, 2nds and 7ths are too dissonant.
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#5
Any of them can sound good, it just matters how you do it.

if you want it to be dissonant, 2nds are the way to go. 3rds and 6th are used most, fifths are ok [usually boring, unless mixed with 3rds, 6ths, or 7ths], 4ths... eh, I dont really like them. More interesting than the 5th though. 7th's are excellent if you want it to be kind of dissonant, or if you want to sound kind of jazzy, or just more unique. 7ths are fun.
#6
Quote by Burning_Angel
Any of them can sound good, it just matters how you do it.

if you want it to be dissonant, 2nds are the way to go. 3rds and 6th are used most, fifths are ok [usually boring, unless mixed with 3rds, 6ths, or 7ths], 4ths... eh, I dont really like them. More interesting than the 5th though. 7th's are excellent if you want it to be kind of dissonant, or if you want to sound kind of jazzy, or just more unique. 7ths are fun.


Chord tones. Haven't taken a look at your song, but when I harmonize, I try to make into a complete chord (Bass takes bass note, obviously, and the other 2 guitars do what ever).
This usually works for slower parts of the song.
When you go into speedy legatos and such, mix up the harmonization, and hit (separate) chord tones on the emphasis/accented part(s) of the measure (or don't). All the possibilities are amazing.
#7
honestly, sixths are awesome. sixths in parallel can be extremely heavy. fourths are also awesome but you have to use them properly. people sometimes dismiss fourths and fifths because they aren't "melodic" but as long as you voice lead in and out of them in an interesting way they are awesome to use.

other than that mixing 2nd and 6ths together i've always found to be cool
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#8
Quote by Nergal22691
If you use 4ths to harmonize you get a very interest almost middle eastern type sound. What you have is good just a tad generic. Experiment with harmonizing single note lines in 4ths and 5ths (which inverted are the same things as 4ths) and see what happens

4ths are rarely used to harmonize, bud.

5ths are good because they don't really flavor the tone if you use them diatonically.
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#9
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
4ths are rarely used to harmonize, bud.

5ths are good because they don't really flavor the tone if you use them diatonically.


yea thats why all the most awesome sounding jazz chords are all stacked fourths. maybe in your world buddy. fourths are used more than you think.

tell that to my riffs too haha. i use fourths all the time.
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#10
listen to Death and Nile, they harmonize in 4ths a lot and listen to Debussy and Ravel, 4ths out the ass. And 4ths and 5ths are would be the same 2 notes anyways just inverted i.e. C to G is a 5th and G to C is a 4th. Also Smoke on the Water possibly the most played riff ever is harmonized entirely in 4ths
#11
and i agree with pmeg most jazz progressions have tons of stacked 4ths. The only time parallel fourths are a "no-no" is in common practice part-writing during mainly the Baroque era. So yeah if you want to write everything in the style of a Bach chorale then don't use 4ths, otherwise Weeping Demon is incredibly wrong..
#12
Eh, it depends completely upon the music you´re writing. In most western music, parallel 4ths and 5ths simply aren´t very pleasing. It´s not common practice just because Bach & Co felt like being assholes or something.

However, parallel 4ths and/or 5ths can be used to great effect, as shown by for example a lot of metal. But in the context of most music with a western tonality, they simply aren´t very desirable.

OP/TS: if you want to create more intresting melodies, try not harmonizing your melodies. Rather, let your melodies take turn moving the music forward, have them move in opposite directions, have them taking different size steps etc etc.
#13
One concept that I was thinking about when harmonizing is not sticking to a specific interval when harmonizing. For example, using a 3rd or 6th for a couple notes and then switching it up to others. Does anybody know what I'm talking about? It seems like an incredibly difficult thing to do!
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i dont know about the polarity and ****, but my regular ones just wont go in the hole without a lot of force.
#14
I agree with that. I assume you mean writing a melody and then harmonizing it in Counterpoint as opposed to writing in parallel intervals. It's really all about what you want to hear, experiment with all these different ideas people are giving and find what sound good to you. It also is a stylistic choice. If you want to write something that is very harmonically pure and mainstream friendly then you want to stick to 3rds and 6ths with maybe the occasional 4th and 5th thrown in as a passing tone. But if you want to write metal or anything with a middle eastern flavor then parallel 4ths and 5ths are completely acceptable and can sound awesome. I would advise against using too many 4ths and 5ths if you are trying to make something either Baroque or Poppy sounding as it can quickly turn a gorgeous Beatles-esque melody into something out of one of Debussy's preludes (which although gorgeous use a lot of parallel octaves, 4ths, and 5ths. Everybody hears things differently so do your own thing and there will always be some people out there that dig it and some that don't. And listen to descara's advice, it is very wise
#15
Quote by pmeg568c
yea thats why all the most awesome sounding jazz chords are all stacked fourths. maybe in your world buddy. fourths are used more than you think.

tell that to my riffs too haha. i use fourths all the time.

I meant in a classical sense. Chorale part arranging.
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#16
oh definitely. but like people have said, now a days there is much more that is acceptable in the music world
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#17
Quote by Nergal22691
listen to Death and Nile, they harmonize in 4ths a lot and listen to Debussy and Ravel, 4ths out the ass. And 4ths and 5ths are would be the same 2 notes anyways just inverted i.e. C to G is a 5th and G to C is a 4th. Also Smoke on the Water possibly the most played riff ever is harmonized entirely in 4ths


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TonyIommi2557, that would be counterpoint to the extreme. And it's very difficult to make it sound good. I've tried and haven't managed to get exactly what I wanted to achieve (Sikth's harmonic rape-age [no, no, not the age of rape, but rampage and rape, together, which really isn't all that much better] is something intrigues and blows my mind on a daily basis).
SO yeah.
Everyone on this page has provided some very sound advice.
#18
TonyIommi, if you would like I can show you a few examples of the way I harmonize riffs, I very very rarely ever stick to a single harmonic color when harmonizing riffs, generally I find that creating shifting harmonies creates a much more varied and living feeling to your ideas. I think what you were describing (switching between 3rd and 6th harmonies) is very plausible and very possible, the most important thing in my opinion would be to pay attention to your underlying root note or chord and make sure the added harmony syncs in properly with your underlying progression.

Of course, this all depends, as someone said earlier, to what style and feel you're aiming for, generally the more complex a shifting harmony, or counterpoint if you will (I still feel this term isn't exactly accurate though, counterpoint to me describes an entirely independant melodic passage, not a variation in harmonies) is, the more it demands from a listener, and sometimes for casual or popular music, simpler is better.
#19
tbh if you listen pretty much all music and vocals are harmonized it gives each note the colour of feeling, thats why we have backing. but some times a note by itself doesnt express what your saying, like a rhythm its one straight beat and needs the other variation colour.
When i hear a melody i hear the harmony normally diads and sometimes triads spread across 2 octaves. but we can only sing one of them. so i sing in 2 lines now and notate it. say i sing "I don't want" lower register"A2 D3 E3" then "D4 E4 G4" higher register thats a 11th 9th then a 10th. and its exactly how i heard it.
I can now sing either line using guitar chords A/D5 Dsus2 Em and its what i wanted it to sound like, point being you need to hear what you sing. if you can hear just 1 note then surely its accompanied a colouring bass note or higher harmonic. dig deep find feeling. Dont use standard mathmatical tools to build your harmony use feeling, what your expressing on each note.
#21
whenever i want to make really interesting harmonies, i write the higher part of the harmony first. then, i have to lower guitar play pretty much any interval other than 2nds and 7ths, so long as the lower part would still make some kind of sense if isolated.

take for example, the riff at measure 65, or at 169 in my tab. i wrote the higher part first, then pretty much chose any interval (other than 2nds or 7th) for each lower note, in a pattern that wasnt total scrambled nonsense

note: this is also a good way to practice writing counterpoint, or in a more "classical/traditional" way
Attachments:
I'm fine.gp5