#1
So at the 5th fret you find the classic A minor pentatonic box pattern. I noticed that the C major scale at the 5th fret has the entire A minor pentatonic pattern "inside" it.

I was playing around with the Guitar Toolkit app on my iTouch.

Is there an explanation for this? All scales are based on the major scale, right? But is there a correlation between these 2 scales that makes one fit inside the other?
#2
A minor and C major are relative minor and major.

You could also say that C major is the same thing as A minor, but you start at C's sixth scale degree (Aeolian mode) and end an octave higher.
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#3
Both scales contain the same notes, therefore they'll form the exact same pattern on the fretboard.
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#4
Ahhh, so the D major and B minor both contain the same notes as do the F major and D minor scales....and the G major and E minor....

I'll have to check out some of the lessons here !

Thanks
#5
Quote by Don223
Ahhh, so the D major and B minor both contain the same notes as do the F major and D minor scales....and the G major and E minor....

I'll have to check out some of the lessons here !

Thanks


Yup they're called relative minors/majors. Be careful not to use them name interchangeably though, as they are different - they just contain the same notes, and as thus have the same key signature and patterns.
#6
Quote by isaac_bandits
Yup they're called relative minors/majors. Be careful not to use them name interchangeably though, as they are different - they just contain the same notes, and as thus have the same key signature and patterns.
This. Another tip though, is to not think of them as "patterns" because then you could get stuck in patterns which is no good. In my opinion, you should think of scales in terms of intervals, and I don't mean just WWHWWWH, I mean like 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 or 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7, and learn the significance of each note and its harmonic and melodic characteristics. It'll greatly improve your writing/improvising skills.
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#7
One of the more fun things to do is play a really melodic/pedal tone sort of vibe over a I-VI-II-V progression using just the major scale for 8 bars, then crank the overdrive and blast into pentatonic stuff for another 8 bars, then back to melodic/pedal...

Good practice and lots of fun!