#1
Hi UG.

I was wondering if anybody had advice on coming up with rhythmic ideas for melodies. Everytime I try and write a melody line, the rhythm is either stupidly similar to a rhythm I always end up playing, or else sounds so "out there" that it doesn't work with the feel of the song. Is there anyway of getting it sorted?

Thanks.

Tom.
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#2
Well, here's a trick.

Break a measure into smaller parts. ie: - if it's in common time, the simplest way to break it is by separating a measure into eight eighth notes. And experiment with those bits, add the snare into the fourth eighth note, add hi-hats into every other even number, hit the toms on the third eight note, and whatnot. And you can break certain parts into triplets and experiment with more complex beats too.

EDIT:- I reread your post to find out that you were talking about melody. Above method applies to melody too. Just plug notes instead of snares and toms.
Last edited by YA89 at Nov 9, 2009,
#4
Don't think so much about it... Feel it...
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#5
Listen to music with interesting rhythms. This way you internalize more interesting/uncommon rhythms and when you come to writing they will just come naturally.

Or experiment with different rhythms on a programme like guitarpro. Use rhythms that look interesting and try and imagine what they will sound like. This will have the advantage of helping you internalize the rhythm and will also help you read rhythms.

Also, try and imagine the rhythm in your head then work it out in standard notation. If you try and write it in standard notation first then the rhythm will often be limited to what you know how to write. The same goes with using the guitar, the rhythm will be limited to what you are used to playing. By imagining it in your head first you are freeing it from those things.
#6
Quote by sTarbuck
...the rhythm is either stupidly similar to a rhythm I always end up playing, or else sounds so "out there" that it doesn't work...
There IS a limitation to what you can do with rhythm, in some regards. Simple, logical patterns make for a feeling of order and familiarity. Complexity can be interesting, but only to a point. After that, it begins to feel foreign and chaotic.

Write out the rhythm pattern(s) you find yourself returning to.
Pay attention to the timing and where the accents are.

Then experiment with making slight alterations in the short/long placements.
Or move the accents about.
Or omit notes.
Not only will you be able to find new patterns that work for you,
but you'll also find ways of altering the rhythm within a song to keep it fresh.
Meadows
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#8
One quick step would be just not starting the melody on the first beat. That usually leads you in a different direction.
Oh yeah.

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#9
Quote by hockeyplayer168
One quick step would be just not starting the melody on the first beat. That usually leads you in a different direction.


Absolutely.

Another thing to do is obviously study melodies that you dig and figure out why you like them so much.
#10
Or come up with lyrics - or even just a sentence, and take the rhythm from that.
#11
Listen to music that sounds like music you want to come up with. The rhythmic ideas will also come though
.