#1
Well I've been learning about the diatonic scale more. The same with the modes, but is there any one way to learn them thats a good way? I want to learn them so I can make up my own music without just playing around on the guitar blindingly searching and trying to find something that sounds good. Figured I'd ask you guys you might know. I'm a bit of a noob at scales. I know my pentatonic minor shapes though /golf clap, no small concession I know. Must learn!!!
#3
I just kinda learned them, in order seemed to be the best way for me just because when you think about it when you move up one mode you're just adding a note per string (most of the time). I just started with Aeolian (the minor scale) and started learning the next one when I have the previous one down, then play one then the other, and then backwards just so you get used to changing positions with them, and to get your brain thinking about their correlations. Then add another and repeat the process over again.

It only took me about a week to have them all memorized, you just gotta make sure you'll be able to transition between them smoothly. Not just ones next to each other but like going from Aeolian to Ionian to Dorian. If you can do this when it comes time to change keys you'll be able to recognize the patterns on the fretboard even after they've moved.

That's just the way I approached it though. Find what works for you, and as long as you're critical of your technique and practice you can't really do it the wrong way. Everyone's got different learning styles
#4
learn the major(ionian) mode and it`s formula and then learn the formula for the other 6 modes.

anyone can run up and down the box patterns though learn how to use the scales and how to move between the shapes and what scales apply to different progressions (basic theory)
#5
Don't worry about modes until you understand the Major scale inside out - including how its constructed in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), notes (eg C Maj = C D E F G A B) and intervals from the root (Root, Maj 2nd, Maj 3rd, Perfect 4th etc). Pretty much every scale you'll ever need can be derived from the Major scale so once you've really learnt the Major scale you've done the hard work.

If you want to write your own stuff easily I'd also learn to harmonise the major scale by stacking 3rds before worrying about other scales.

You don't have to understand music theory to write, but it can make it a whole lot easier.
#6
Oh I know about scales what they deal with intervals and how they're constructed . I know the modes as well, but what I really need is a picture that shows all the boxes, so that I can practice. I don't know the fretboard that well, so thats why I need the diagrams.
#7
Quote by LifeInTheGrave
Oh I know about scales what they deal with intervals and how they're constructed . I know the modes as well, but what I really need is a picture that shows all the boxes, so that I can practice. I don't know the fretboard that well, so thats why I need the diagrams.

No, that's why you need to learn the fretboard better.
Quote by dudetheman
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