#1
Hello folks! I'm gonna order soon a custom guitar.
And I was wondering about the fretboard Radius...What to choose? A smaller or a bigger radius? How does the radius affect the playability of the guitar?
#2
Small radius is easier to make chords. Not very good for extreme bends Larger radius is easier for shredding and bending. If your ordering a neck check out Warmoth.com they have a compound radius that gets great review goes from 10 to 16m.
They have a chart on the site talking about the differences

ESP LTD RZK-600
4 Custom Strats
1 Custom Soloist (Warmoth)
1 Custom Telecaster (Warmoth)
2007 Jimmie Vaughan Sig Strat

Callaham Hardware & Bridges
Fender Custom Shop 69's
Dimarzio Breed Pickups

Blues Junior Amp
BlackStar HT Club 40 Amp
#3
If you have to ask these questions on the forums you haven't done enough research IMO. Send an email to the luthier with any other questions you have before asking for a price quote. You really do need to be certain as to what you want as it's not simple or cheap to start changing parts halfway through a build.
#4
It's really a matter of your playing style! Too small a radius and your strings will "fret out" when they are moved across the fingerboard sideways during a bend. If you want to be able to do proper bends (1 to 1-1/2 tones) you need at least a 10 inch radius if not 12. Fender uses smaller, 7-1/2 is vintage while 9 is modern. Gibson, Epiphone is 12 while many others are 10. As mentioned Warmoth has a compound radius where the lower egisters are 10 and it slowly moves up to 16 in the higher registers.
Moving on.....
#5
Quote by KenG
It's really a matter of your playing style! Too small a radius and your strings will "fret out" when they are moved across the fingerboard sideways during a bend. If you want to be able to do proper bends (1 to 1-1/2 tones) you need at least a 10 inch radius if not 12. Fender uses smaller, 7-1/2 is vintage while 9 is modern. Gibson, Epiphone is 12 while many others are 10. As mentioned Warmoth has a compound radius where the lower egisters are 10 and it slowly moves up to 16 in the higher registers.


That sounds interesting. I guess a compound radius would be a good choice