#1
I wasn't sure in which forum I should post this, but here goes..

I recently joined my school's blues band. It consists of:
3 guitarists (including me; usually 2 of them play at once), 1 drummer, 1 singer, 1 bassist and occasionally some horns (1-2 trumpets, 1-2 saxophones)
Our first concert is on the 27th of November, in 17 days. This'll be my first stage experience!...
And I've got some questions

Firstly, I have a Vox AC15CC1. Will it be loud enough? The room isn't really big and there's gonna be under 100 people.

My other, and more important problem, is that I don't feel like I'm ready. Why? Because I'm not satisfied with my phrasing and my rhythm playing... I feel like I'm always playing the same licks when soloing, and my rhythm playing just feels...bland.

I know I have to practice a lot during the next weeks, but what kind of exercices should I focus on to improve my phrasing (in the pentatonic blues scale), my rhythm during solos(as in tempo rhythm, not chord playing) and my rhythm playing (like playing "fills" a la Jimi or SRV)

Also, if you have any other tips for anything related to performing, please let me know them!

Thanks!

Sorry if this was in the wrong forum...
Last edited by ARguitars at Nov 10, 2009,
#3
Listen to peter green when he was with fleetwood Mac back in the 60s. He uses some pretty simple licks to great effect. Also pick up a glass slide to add some change of style.
#4
This should be in musician forums.

For playing rhythm-lead and those fills you're talking about, look up albert king, he's the guy jimi stole a lot of his licks from. What he usually does is take a twelve bar pattern and add in licks to it, or play it in an unconventional way (for instance, play an A-D-E twelve bar blues and change up the way you finger the chords, you can play the A in many ways, including A9 or A7, or do a trill on the fifth fret, or bar the high strings on the fifth fret and scat).

If you are playing the same licks when soloing, make them different. Go with your band and how the mood of the song is changing, slow down your lick, add a bend or two, throw a powerchord in the middle of it, palm mute and scratch after a bend etc. The original intention of blues was to use minimum resources to maximum effect. Everybody in it uses pentatonics and everyone still sounds incredibly different, you'd be surprised what slowing down or adding one or two bends or a trill will do.

Your amp will not be loud enough for cleaner tones with that band, ask someone if you could borrow theirs, if not, it's not that bad, you'll just play with a dirtier tone, roll back your guitar volume to clean it up or try out clean settings when the band is real quiet.

for reference, look at this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6uQK8k0yoE&feature=related

It's blues-rock/rock and roll, but it's a perfect example of small variations having a big effect, those verses are all on the same chord, jimi's just hitting it with different emphasis and different strength and changing timing. He also occasionally bends the chord. When it starts getting bland, he goes back to doing those little lead fills, come up with a few to spice things up just like this.
Last edited by Plexi81 at Nov 10, 2009,
#5
Quote by Plexi81
This should be in musician forums.

For playing rhythm-lead and those fills you're talking about, look up albert king, he's the guy jimi stole a lot of his licks from. What he usually does is take a twelve bar pattern and add in licks to it, or play it in an unconventional way (for instance, play an A-D-E twelve bar blues and change up the way you finger the chords, you can play the A in many ways, including A9 or A7, or do a trill on the fifth fret, or bar the high strings on the fifth fret and scat).

If you are playing the same licks when soloing, make them different. Go with your band and how the mood of the song is changing, slow down your lick, add a bend or two, throw a powerchord in the middle of it, palm mute and scratch after a bend etc. The original intention of blues was to use minimum resources to maximum effect. Everybody in it uses pentatonics and everyone still sounds incredibly different, you'd be surprised what slowing down or adding one or two bends or a trill will do.

Your amp will not be loud enough for cleaner tones with that band, ask someone if you could borrow theirs, if not, it's not that bad, you'll just play with a dirtier tone, roll back your guitar volume to clean it up or try out clean settings when the band is real quiet.

for reference, look at this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6uQK8k0yoE&feature=related

It's blues-rock/rock and roll, but it's a perfect example of small variations having a big effect, those verses are all on the same chord, jimi's just hitting it with different emphasis and different strength and changing timing. He also occasionally bends the chord. When it starts getting bland, he goes back to doing those little lead fills, come up with a few to spice things up just like this.



Scratching after a bend?
GEAR

1966 MUSTANG

valveking 112

markley tuner
Ernie Ball Wah
digitech whammy
fulltone ocd
usa big muff
boss dd7
boss rc-2

Quote by simpleben09
You sir have a mean ass rig. Have a great day.
#6
Quote by MCRrocks
john mayer

Laugh my ass off, you made my day =D

I must stress this, KEEP PRACTICING. Eventually your phrasing gets more and more efficient with more and more practice. Just don't stop, constantly renew your fervor for playing, and understand that you'll get better if you keep practicing your shapes and the different techniques. That's how all us blues players start out, not sure of our abilities when compared to faster genres like metal, but I assure you that metal really isn't difficult if you know your theory have practiced all the different techniques and patterns, it is in fact fairly easy once you decide to give it a try. Listen to Plexi, he's spot on. Nearly everyone utilizes the pentatonic yet sounds different due to their own developed style. Also listen to some of the obvious greats, B.B. King, Vaughan, Magic Slim, etc. It will give you ideas to work with, when you have the blues running through your system, you feel it and it explodes on the fretboard