#1
Quick little fake "research" survey:

1. Are any of you required to complete portfolios outside of art classes?

2. If so, what classes?

3. What kind of things are put into the portfolio? Are they for best works, or do you show progress in the portfolio?

4. What country (I'm looking mainly for US responses, but I would be curious to know if other countries use portfolios, and their frequency compared to the US), and what state if in the US.


I'm getting my masters in education and I'm looking at portfolios as an assessment tool, but have never seen them myself. So this is mainly for my own curiosity.

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#3
1. Yes.

2. Literature and Composition classes.

3. My school uses portfolios to gauge the student's progress, although the advanced Composition classes focuses a little more on compiling best work, usually with an interest to publish it somewhere.

4. Atlanta, Georgia, United States.
#5
1. Kinda, but it doesn't seem like that big of a deal. Yet, anyway.

2. We did in English the past few years, but I've never kept up with it. Also, in Humanities. That's a college level course sponsored by the local community college, and the portfolios are so they can make sure we're doing the right stuff.

3. They've all been a progress portfolio.

4. My English classes were when I lived in MD. Humanities in FL.


I like the idea of having students keep their work in order. I don't know what subject you plan to teach or anything, but I think it would help in any class. I say have them do it mostly for their own benefit. If you want to, grade it based on if they have what they need, like essays and stuff. Maybe have them write a reflection, but just to see if they can see any progress and why, or if not, what they could do to improve, or something like that. The reflection should only be graded on if they've written what they should, not the structure, grammar, etc.

Oh yeah, I'm kinda doing a portfolio on my own in composition. It's not required, but I think it will be helpful for me.
Last edited by byob_soad2 at Nov 10, 2009,
#7
Quote by byob_soad2



I like the idea of having students keep their work in order. I don't know what subject you plan to teach or anything, but I think it would help in any class. I say have them do it mostly for their own benefit. If you want to, grade it based on if they have what they need, like essays and stuff. Maybe have them write a reflection, but just to see if they can see any progress and why, or if not, what they could do to improve, or something like that. The reflection should only be graded on if they've written what they should, not the structure, grammar, etc.


I will be teaching high school literature and composition, and I do plan on using portfolios in my classrooms. At the very least, I will have something very similar to what you are talking about (astute, btw. this is a very common way of using portfolios)-- the portfolio will be used to see progress. At the end of the year, I might ask the students to pick 2 or 3 works they felt were the best representations of them, and have them write reflections. However, my true goal is to use a discussion board much like UG to get students using technology as part of their education, since clearly, that is where the world is heading. That will also enable the "digital portfolio" to have information that is not as accessible in a normal portfolio, such as the progression of a student's thought through a discussion.

TLR; Thanks for your thoughtful response!

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#9
1. Yes. For the anal teachers. English and Physics
3. put everything we do in class into the portfolios.
4. er. I'm in California. I go to a small private school, so I guess it's sorta different.
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#10
Quote by apak
1. Yes. For the anal teachers. English and Physics
3. put everything we do in class into the portfolios.
4. er. I'm in California. I go to a small private school, so I guess it's sorta different.


Do you do anything with the portfolios after you put the stuff into them? Or do they just sit there collecting dust?

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#11
Quote by roamingbard13
I will be teaching high school literature and composition, and I do plan on using portfolios in my classrooms. At the very least, I will have something very similar to what you are talking about (astute, btw. this is a very common way of using portfolios)-- the portfolio will be used to see progress. At the end of the year, I might ask the students to pick 2 or 3 works they felt were the best representations of them, and have them write reflections. However, my true goal is to use a discussion board much like UG to get students using technology as part of their education, since clearly, that is where the world is heading. That will also enable the "digital portfolio" to have information that is not as accessible in a normal portfolio, such as the progression of a student's thought through a discussion.

TLR; Thanks for your thoughtful response!

That's a pretty cool idea. I've dreamed(not sleeping ) of a time where binders and notebooks are replaced by laptops that connect to the desks or tables and teaches can email or transmit the papers and presentations to everyone that way. There would, of course, be blocks so students can email answers and such.
I'm sure it's already done somewhere, but I see it happening in all or most public schools eventually.

I think that doing it in a discussion board would definitely get more students involved in it. It's much more fun that way, and it's not like it's bribing them with rewards or anything.

We usually did reflections at the end of the semester or at other points, but sometimes we had to write a bit about all of them. It's understandable, but it sounds overwhelming, so your way is definitely best.

Another "tip," not related, would be to throw in funny stories if you have time. In my physics class we spent a lot of time listening to his funny high school and college stories, and we had an enjoyable time. If there's not much time for stories, some short jokes would be good too. My physics class was an hour and a half compared to 45 minute classes here. My comp teacher is old and pervy which makes it better, but he makes references to pop culture and jokes about students(in a friendly way), so it's really enjoyable. It's definitely much easier to learn when you enjoy going to a class. Give the students something to look forward to.
#12
1. Yes

2. Math, English, Science.

3. Basically anything important. Ex: tests, essays, progress reports.
Although the best works are kept in the beginning of the portfolios.

4. United States, New York.
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#13
1)Yes
2)English
3)Important essays, some teachers said to show your improvement over the years, others said to show off your best works.
4)Maryland, US
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