#1
Hey everyone i grew up listneing and playing along to bands that never really had many solo's in there music bands like Blur, The Smiths, The Beatles,Pavement, Radiohead ...... and over time ive gotten into more and more types of music.

Bands like Incubus, The Police, King Crimson, Yo La Tengo, Smashing Pumpkins, RHCP, John Frusciante, Graham Coxon, Yes, Doves, The Strokes, The Smiths, The Cure, Elliot Smith, Nick Drake, Radiohead, Pavement, Wings, Paul McCartney, Surfjan Stevens, Beach Boys, The Futureheads, Jimi Hendrix, Mellowdrone, Mars Volta.

Im really happy with my riff work and rhythm is really good because of the bands i grew up playing along too, but i cant put together a great solo, i would say if i had to compare my solo style it would be John frusciante in terms of scale/speed/shredding ability....

I really wanna be able to put together a really nice solo with its ups and downs and really fast licks and nice string bends, i have been practicing and practicing but im pretty sure ive got my postioning or technique all wrong and most of the vids ive watched that show how to hold picks and how to play properely arent very clear or easily to see what theyre doing on screen.

The level im trying to get too is like Robert Fripp who is also fast at picking notes within a chord really fast as well as soloing.

does anyone have any good pointers or starting dvd's or such?

cheers
#2
you are gonna hate me for this, but play your scales up and down ten times each at a slow tempo without mistake. every time you screw up start over. i really hate to say this but you will find "patterns" in certain "hand positions" that make you able to go across the fretboard. so do that and continually build tempo every time you complete a full set. at first it may take you ten minutes to go through them all, but if you keep at it you should be able to play it faster. that is all i have to offer. good luck.
#3
Well don't worry about picking fast, speed comes naturally so you can't exactly force yourself to play faster unless your hands can keep up.

As for soloing, do some homework, hendrix has some great R&B rhythm and lead stuff but look at solo work from various genres, Rhoads and Yngwie studied classical and they turned out BEAST.

Also, never try and force out a solo, the best solos are the ones that stay in context with the song and forcing yourself would be you screaming at your hand to make a crazy solo which I can't really see anyone doing (except Jack Black he cracks me up ).

GL
"Wipe ur lip, I see some ass on there..."

"A guitar is only good in the hands of a good guitarist...unless it's a REALLY sexy guitar..."
#4
Quote by BeckWreck
you are gonna hate me for this, but play your scales up and down ten times each at a slow tempo without mistake. every time you screw up start over. i really hate to say this but you will find "patterns" in certain "hand positions" that make you able to go across the fretboard. so do that and continually build tempo every time you complete a full set. at first it may take you ten minutes to go through them all, but if you keep at it you should be able to play it faster. that is all i have to offer. good luck.


This is teaching him how to play scales up and down really fast, not useful speed or soloing.
#5
The key to learning solos is to slow them down and break them up. You can't just expect to be able to play them at full speed your first time. Pick out the parts you have the most trouble with and slow them down to a speed you can play them at perfectly. Gradually build up your speed. After that it's just a matter of putting it all back together.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#6
have been practicing and practicing but im pretty sure ive got my postioning or technique all wrong and most of the vids ive watched that show how to hold picks and how to play properely arent very clear or easily to see what theyre doing on screen.
#7
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
This is teaching him how to play scales up and down really fast, not useful speed or soloing.


yeah thats what i am doing here. through this, he will increase technical ability and give him muscle memory of what his scales are in his hands. from the question asked, i derived that he wants to be able to play quickly. in order to do that, you must become proficient in both hands. through doing this, you increase the coordination between left and right hands. if you have any imagination, you can pick out which notes you want to play in a scale. i won't try to tell you what intervals sound the coolest; that comes in time and musical taste. even if you read a solo off of sheet music or tablature, you can identify what key and what pattern, thus increasing ease of play.

so yes, in essence i have just given him a really boring way to practice. but doing this 10 hours a week will deeply increase playing ability. imagination will come in time as will technical ability.

shred on, good sir.
#8
Well, the good news is that since you are good at rhythm, you've got the most core stuff already in place - a sense of timing and groove.

I'd say the best thing to do would be to take some lessons with an experienced instructor. If recurring lessons are a problem, then maybe you could take just a few...
If there is a fundamental issue with your lead technique, a good teacher will be able to spot it and set you on the right path.

If you are having problems being creative with the tools that you have right now, then I say screw it, don't worry about being creative for a while. Soak up everything you can from the bands you mentioned by learning their solos, then once you have more tools at your disposal the creativity will be come. You can't force that stuff.