#1
I recently joined my school's blues band. It consists of:
3 guitarists (including me; usually 2 of them play at once), 1 drummer, 1 singer, 1 bassist and occasionally some horns (1-2 trumpets, 1-2 saxophones)
Our first concert is on the 27th of November, in 17 days. This'll be my first stage experience!...
And I've got some questions

I'm not satisfied with my phrasing and my rhythm playing... I feel like I'm always playing the same licks when soloing, and my rhythm playing just feels...bland.

I know I have to practice a lot during the next weeks, but what kind of exercices should I focus on to improve my phrasing (in the pentatonic blues scale), my rhythm during solos(as in tempo rhythm, not chord playing) and my rhythm playing (like playing "fills" a la Jimi or SRV)

Also, if you have any other tips for anything related to performing, please let me know them!

Thanks!
#3
One simple thing that can help with phrasing is simply not starting on the first beat. Something Joe Satriani does a lot. Simply waiting a half or full beat before jumping in can start you off in a completely new direction in terms of melody.
Oh yeah.

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#4
As a guitarist, we don't often aim for this, but a well placed long brought out note can be fantastic, we can't crescendo it like a great blues sax can, and if you have a problem with this, maybe you can pick it really fast (forget what thats called).

What people also really like and you'll be surprised how many people completeley ignore this.. the vocals and melody line. In blues it'll usually just use the blues scale, try and get some of that melody under your fingers, it sounds fantastic and if after a bit of fiddling you go into the melody this really grabs people's attention!

I have an extremely short attention span and regularly hear but don't listen to soloes..so I should know!
Last edited by mdwallin at Nov 12, 2009,
#5
Quote by mdwallin
we can't crescendo it like a great blues sax can
Fixed.

Great advice though.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
For phrasing I find it helps to have lyrics - doesn't matter how bad, its not like anyone but me will ever hear them - running through my head, and kind of play them on my guitar.
#8
If its something you hear alot, then mabye the crowd mabye hasn't heard it so much, making it cool.
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#9
Quote by zhilla
For phrasing I find it helps to have lyrics - doesn't matter how bad, its not like anyone but me will ever hear them - running through my head, and kind of play them on my guitar.


This is a good practice - especially with the blues.

Just pretend you are "saying" or "singing" something with the guitar.
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#10
What techniques do you use? Stop using them for a few days. Do something else. If you find yourself sweeping all the time, try tapping instead.

EDIT: Also, chromatics, chromatics, chromatics. Find what chromatics work, do some research, and use them. It's more interesting when there are chromatics.
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Last edited by woodenbandman at Nov 13, 2009,