#1
Does anyone know any scales for Jazz impprovising?
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Quote by NGD1313
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#2
i wouldnt think of it that way for right now.

for one thing, how well can you comp at the moment? comping chords should be your first priority, over learning melody lines or soloing. get comfortable with all fingerings for the basic chords, including omitting fifths, and eventually even roots. also, extended shapes, 9ths and 11ths and 13ths.

if your beyond this point, and have reached a level where you can comp songs all the way through on a first read through (im not to that point yet), then your first priority for soloing should actually be arpeggiating through the changes. start with just playing the basic arpeggio shapes, then eventually begin starting arpeggios on the 3rd or 5th, rather than always at the root. (i know for a fact im not to this point yet)

theres about 3 years (minimum) of guitar playing laid out for you.
#4
Quote by PapaKooLay
I just use the Blue Scale

and you solos, i can assure you, are bland and use overplayed tricks. modes are like different colors in a painting. your painting will suck if you only use blue. like said above, study what chords you're playing over. be able to arpeggiate over the changes. Here's what you should use for your most common jazz chords:

Maj7 - Major, Mixolydian,
Min7 - Dorian, Phrygian (depending on context and how you use it)
dom7 - Mixolydian
dim7 - whole/half tone scale
sus - lydian i find works well, but you could use many of the scales above with emphasis on the 4th and 9th
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#5
to correct the above poster
use the major scale or mixolydian mode over Maj 7 chords, unless your looking for outright dissonance (in which case any scale works over any chord).
Now, Dont get hung up on scales. Some of the best jazz players barely focused on scales, only really using mixolydian, major, dorian, blues and altered. focus on playing changes, playing lines that properly articulate the harmoney through sophisticated use of chord tones, extensions (which can come from a scale, for example CM13- C E G B D F A contains all of the notes of a C major scale) and chromatism. also learn vocabulary; transcribe solos or licks you like and incorperate them (the licks and phrases) into your own playing. also, learn some simple tunes (a blues like blue monk or a tune like st thomas or take the A train) in every key.
#6
Quote by Hendrix4ever
and you solos, i can assure you, are bland and use overplayed tricks. modes are like different colors in a painting. your painting will suck if you only use blue. like said above, study what chords you're playing over. be able to arpeggiate over the changes. Here's what you should use for your most common jazz chords:

Maj7 - Major, Mixolydian,
Min7 - Dorian, Phrygian (depending on context and how you use it)
dom7 - Mixolydian
dim7 - whole/half tone scale
sus - lydian i find works well, but you could use many of the scales above with emphasis on the 4th and 9th


First, mixolydian over a maj7 chord would sound like shit. Mixolydian has a b7, which would grind against the maj7. Second, you'd usually use phrygian over a m7b9 chord, or some such variation, dorian is pretty much the standard for min7 chords.

Third, it's really misleading to call them modes in the first place. You're really just playing according to the changes in chord tones.
#7
Blues, Major, Natural Minor, Harmonic Minor, Diminished, Pentatonic Minor/Major to name a few. It really depends on the rhythm being played behind the solo.
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#8
I'd say don't focus on scales. Mostly, jazz can't really be explained that way. Target chord tones, play arpeggios. Try approaching the chord tones chromatically.
#9
Quote by Ari.Macbeth57
Does anyone know any scales for Jazz impprovising?
All of them?

If you don't understand scales well enough to know which to use in what situation, I'd start learning about them in more depth - so you understand how they are constructed, what chords work well with what scales and why they work well, and for improvising in the meantime focus on chord tones for anything thats not diatonic.
#10
It also helps if you know as many chord formulas as possible.....

Maj7 - R-3-5-7, Min7 - R-b3-5-b7, etc.....

And learn scale formulas....

Study the relationship between scales and chords. Learn to associate chords to arpeggios and scales.
#11
Blues scale pattern:
D:----------5-7
A:----5-6-7
E:5-8

Continue this scale up/figure out the intervals and put it in whatever key you want.
#12
Quote by cerpintaxt45
i wouldnt think of it that way for right now.

for one thing, how well can you comp at the moment? comping chords should be your first priority, over learning melody lines or soloing. get comfortable with all fingerings for the basic chords, including omitting fifths, and eventually even roots. also, extended shapes, 9ths and 11ths and 13ths.

if your beyond this point, and have reached a level where you can comp songs all the way through on a first read through (im not to that point yet), then your first priority for soloing should actually be arpeggiating through the changes. start with just playing the basic arpeggio shapes, then eventually begin starting arpeggios on the 3rd or 5th, rather than always at the root. (i know for a fact im not to this point yet)

theres about 3 years (minimum) of guitar playing laid out for you.


This may be a stupid question, but what is comping chords? I looked it up and couldn't really find many sources that agreed with eachother.
#13
Quote by morrock
This may be a stupid question, but what is comping chords? I looked it up and couldn't really find many sources that agreed with eachother.


Comping is short for accompaniment, basically playing the chords/rhythm of the song.
#14
Think of it as short for "complement" too.

Comping in a jazz context tends to involve a little more thought than simply playing the chord progression of the song along with the rhythm though. Rarely will you find a jazz guitarist (or any rhythmic instrument player) simply playing an Ebmin7 on the beat in 4/4 time.. The point of comping is to help the soloist sound good, really, and because syncopation, phrasing, rhythmic variation, and melodic sensibility are so important in jazz, it helps to know all the inversions and extensions of chords (look up drop 2 chords) because there will often be an inversion of any given chord that could complement the soloist better.

What you define as "better" is of course opinion, but you'll find that many jazz guitarists (such as Pat Martino, Wes Montgomery, Pat Metheny, etc.) often use very sparse comping, switching inversions and positions regularly. Ultimately it's up to your ear to decide, but playing flat four rhythms with bland chords will sound very inappropriate in 99% of jazz situations.
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#15
The chromatic scale

EDIT: No, for serious. Don't forget the importance of chromatics. Jason Becker knew all about chromatics.
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#16
Quote by Instrumetal
Think of it as short for "complement" too.

Comping in a jazz context tends to involve a little more thought than simply playing the chord progression of the song along with the rhythm though. Rarely will you find a jazz guitarist (or any rhythmic instrument player) simply playing an Ebmin7 on the beat in 4/4 time.. The point of comping is to help the soloist sound good, really, and because syncopation, phrasing, rhythmic variation, and melodic sensibility are so important in jazz, it helps to know all the inversions and extensions of chords (look up drop 2 chords) because there will often be an inversion of any given chord that could complement the soloist better.

What you define as "better" is of course opinion, but you'll find that many jazz guitarists (such as Pat Martino, Wes Montgomery, Pat Metheny, etc.) often use very sparse comping, switching inversions and positions regularly. Ultimately it's up to your ear to decide, but playing flat four rhythms with bland chords will sound very inappropriate in 99% of jazz situations.

Ehhhh, that really depends on the time period and style. In swing, the rhythm section did generally play on the beat all the time. Count Basie kind of got away from that with his "less is more" approach on piano. The whole "playing splashes of chords" instead of on the beat came around in the bebop era.
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#17
Quote by zhilla
All of them?

If you don't understand scales well enough to know which to use in what situation, I'd start learning about them in more depth - so you understand how they are constructed, what chords work well with what scales and why they work well, and for improvising in the meantime focus on chord tones for anything thats not diatonic.


Great advice.
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#18
There are only two scales that you need to know: the major scale and the minor scale.

EDIT: Reading fail on my part. I missed "Jazz" in the title . Disregard my two cents.
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Last edited by Eastwinn at Nov 13, 2009,
#19
Quote by timeconsumer09
First, mixolydian over a maj7 chord would sound like shit. Mixolydian has a b7, which would grind against the maj7.

while your theory 'theoretically' makes sense, this is not the case. because of the major thirds and sixths the scale works quite well. if you try it you'll find it's a very nice scale to use for a major chord
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#20
Quote by Hendrix4ever
while your theory 'theoretically' makes sense, this is not the case. because of the major thirds and sixths the scale works quite well. if you try it you'll find it's a very nice scale to use for a major chord

It would be much easier to just use the major scale. It still has those lovely thirds and sixths as well as a seventh that doesn't clash horribly. Basic logic tells us that.
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#21
mixolydian can sound good over a major seventh chord if you use the b7 as a passing tone on an off beat, but then your really just playing the major scale anyway and using chromatism, if you want an alternative to the major scale; lydian or Major scale with a b6 ('harmonic major' if you want) are far (in my opinion) better solutions. However, monk did often use a b7 over major chords (including in his 'comping'), but he was never really concerned with scales or rules to begin with.