#1
I have been playing for three years but im not experienced with theory what are some scales or modes i should start with.
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#2
http://www.magicbooktheory.com/g_modes1.htm
and
http://www.magicbooktheory.com/g_scales1.htm
to start with., instead of explaining with a wall of text.
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#3
Don't even think about modes. Learn the major scale really well first, that will make everything else clearer, as almost all other scales are based off of it. Trying to learn modes or exotic scales, especially for a theory newcomer, will just confuse you. Major scale is the way to go.
#4
Quote by timeconsumer09
Don't even think about modes. Learn the major scale really well first, that will make everything else clearer, as almost all other scales are based off of it. Trying to learn modes or exotic scales, especially for a theory newcomer, will just confuse you. Major scale is the way to go.

+1
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#5
The Major Scale
The Minor Scale
The Minor Pentatonic
The Major Pentatonic

This should keep you busy for quite awhile. Don't start with modes yet.
#6
Quote by timeconsumer09
Don't even think about modes. Learn the major scale really well first, that will make everything else clearer, as almost all other scales are based off of it. Trying to learn modes or exotic scales, especially for a theory newcomer, will just confuse you. Major scale is the way to go.


+2
#7
Quote by timeconsumer09
Don't even think about modes. Learn the major scale really well first, that will make everything else clearer, as almost all other scales are based off of it. Trying to learn modes or exotic scales, especially for a theory newcomer, will just confuse you. Major scale is the way to go.
+3
#8
Quote by timeconsumer09
Don't even think about modes. Learn the major scale really well first, that will make everything else clearer, as almost all other scales are based off of it. Trying to learn modes or exotic scales, especially for a theory newcomer, will just confuse you. Major scale is the way to go.

+4
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#9
I'm an intermediate myself, but know nothing about music theory.

You say to start with the major scales, but there are only 5 and its basicly only knowing roots notes, right?
Correct me if im wrong and what could be the next step?
#10
Quote by timeconsumer09
Don't even think about modes. Learn the major scale really well first, that will make everything else clearer, as almost all other scales are based off of it. Trying to learn modes or exotic scales, especially for a theory newcomer, will just confuse you. Major scale is the way to go.


+6

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#11
Quote by Knappe Turk
I'm an intermediate myself, but know nothing about music theory.

You say to start with the major scales, but there are only 5 and its basicly only knowing roots notes, right?
Correct me if im wrong and what could be the next step?
The Major scale is WWHWWWH, or R 2 3 4 5 6 7, and you could say there are 12 - one for each key. I'm guessing you mean you've learnt 5 scale shapes, which is a start but it's a long way from understanding the scale.

If you learn how the Major scale is constructed in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), notes (eg C Maj = C D E F G A B, G Maj = G A B C D E F# etc) and intervals (Root, Maj 2nd, Maj 3rd, Perfect 4th etc) it should make it easier for you to work out different ways to use the scale, and it will definitely make learning other scales a lot easier, as pretty much any scale or mode you'll ever need can be derived from the major scale.
#12
Quote by zhilla
The Major scale is WWHWWWH, or R 2 3 4 5 6 7, and you could say there are 12 - one for each key. I'm guessing you mean you've learnt 5 scale shapes, which is a start but it's a long way from understanding the scale.

If you learn how the Major scale is constructed in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), notes (eg C Maj = C D E F G A B, G Maj = G A B C D E F# etc) and intervals (Root, Maj 2nd, Maj 3rd, Perfect 4th etc) it should make it easier for you to work out different ways to use the scale, and it will definitely make learning other scales a lot easier, as pretty much any scale or mode you'll ever need can be derived from the major scale.


Well that seems not to hard if u ask me.
I know the scale for the Amajor, Cmajor, Gmajor, Emajor and Dmajor.
But i dont know what to do next.
And i'm also confused about modes such as Aeolian and Ionian.
Arent they just the same as the major scale only just a different root?
Also maybe a stupid question, but how many scales are there?
#13
Quote by Knappe Turk

And i'm also confused about modes such as Aeolian and Ionian.
Arent they just the same as the major scale only just a different root?


Dont worry about modes until later. They are derived from the major scale;
the root isnt different but the tonic. Read the sticky: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1042392

Quote by Knappe Turk

Also maybe a stupid question, but how many scales are there?


A lot. Dont think there's an exact answer to this.
#14
Quote by Knappe Turk
Well that seems not to hard if u ask me.
I know the scale for the Amajor, Cmajor, Gmajor, Emajor and Dmajor.
But i dont know what to do next.
And i'm also confused about modes such as Aeolian and Ionian.
Arent they just the same as the major scale only just a different root?
Also maybe a stupid question, but how many scales are there?
Its not hard if you do it in a logical order. Try and jump ahead of yurself and you'll make it harder than it needs to be though.

Do you understand how the Major scale is constructed? Could you play C Major single string on your B string, or 3 nps starting from your pinkie on the 8th fret of the E string? Could you play C# Major?

If not, look at how the scale is constructed so you can work out how to do stuff like that. It will make other scales and a whole lot of other music theory a lot easier if you can really understand the major scale.

If you can do that I'd learn how to harmonise the scale by stacking 3rds - that lets you easily construct chords in key, which helps with identifying the key of a song or chord progression, and in coming up with your own chord progressions. And makes it easier when you come to understand other scales and modes.

Before you worry about modes, learn how the natural minor scale is related to the major scale, and how the pentatonic scales are related to the Major and minor scales.

And USE the scales you know - you've put the effort in to learn them, so start to have some fun with them.
Last edited by zhilla at Nov 11, 2009,
#15
Quote by Knappe Turk
I'm an intermediate myself, but know nothing about music theory.

You say to start with the major scales, but there are only 5 and its basicly only knowing roots notes, right?
Correct me if im wrong and what could be the next step?

nope, there's one....there's "the major scale", as in the unique set of melodic intervals that define it as explained by zhilla.

One of the first steps to understanding theory is realising that scales are not patterns or shapes, they're sequences of notes, of sounds. How those sounds interact and work together is the important thing. Where you play those notes isn't actually particularly important in the greater scheme of things, it's little more than a matter of convenience/preference.
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#16
Quote by steven seagull
nope, there's one....there's "the major scale", as in the unique set of melodic intervals that define it as explained by zhilla.

One of the first steps to understanding theory is realising that scales are not patterns or shapes, they're sequences of notes, of sounds. How those sounds interact and work together is the important thing. Where you play those notes isn't actually particularly important in the greater scheme of things, it's little more than a matter of convenience/preference.


This. While it's great to know scale shapes for ease of use or navigating quickly in a pinch, knowing the scale formulas ALONG WITH shapes will make it infinitely more helpful, and will help you to better choose your notes in solos so you can convey your emotions more easily thorough the music.