#1
overdrive, fuzz and distortion?
flanger and phaser?
Delay and echo?

someone please explain, I'm getting confused, especially by the first one.
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#2
Delay = Echo

Overdrive = boosts your entire signal a lot so it can push the tubes harder. In some pedal, it gives you control to boost entire sections of your signal (e.g. bass, mids, low mids, high mids, treble etc)

Distortion = actually takes the sine wave of your guitar signal and distorts it... most often by clipping the top of the sine "hump" or bottom of the sine "dip" off.

Fuzz = I'm not quite sure what it does... but I'm guess it... fuzzes up your signal?
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Last edited by ragingkitty at Nov 11, 2009,
#3
overdrive - emulates the sound of an overdriven amp
fuzz - makes your guitar tone sound very scratchy
Distortion is anything that distorts your tone.. OD & Fuzz = Distortion effects

Phase and Flanger.. those effects make your sound wavy. idk how to technically differentiate the two, but they each sound different.

delay - delays
echo - echoes
pretty self explanatory
#4
Overdrive is very much like many of the bands in the 60s, particularly Cream & also Hendrix. Fuzz is more muddled or fuzzy; the notes of a chord have less definition, for example, when using fuzz. Distortion is simply using gain to manipulate the lows, highs, and mids; Fuzz & Overdrive are a type of distortion.

Flanger & phaser are very similar. When played with certain distortions, both sound very much like lasers. The difference is flangers emphasize the highs, while phasers emphasize the lows.

Delay is like holding a note for a very, very short time & releasing it, usually in a repeating pattern; usually it's a very passive effect. Echo is simply an emulation of an echo, i. e. someone yodeling in the Alps; it just bounces the note against something, though not physically.
#5
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Overdrive is very much like many of the bands in the 60s, particularly Cream & also Hendrix. Fuzz is more muddled or fuzzy; the notes of a chord have less definition, for example, when using fuzz. Distortion is simply using gain to manipulate the lows, highs, and mids; Fuzz & Overdrive are a type of distortion.


I'd associate the fuzz pedal with '60's guitarists..
#7
Quote by Skuzzmo
Are you lot guessing these answers or what?


feel free to correct us professor
#9
phase actually duplicates your wavelength, reverses it (i.e. goes negative when your original goes positive, meets at unity at the same time as original), then mixes that duplicate with your original signal with a wet/dry control (assumng the phaser you're looking at has a "mix" function...some of course do not, and just mix 50/50).

/\/\/ +\/\/\ =

/\/\/
\/\/\

make sense?

flanger = chorus. same thing, slower rate. some choruses also have vibrato functions... this is typically an anomaly of the rate at higher speeds.

overdrive does emulate the sound of an overdriven tube amp. this is called soft clipping. it also increases your gain, and thus pushes your preamp tubes harder, which leads to actual tube overdrive (with appropriate settings).

distortion = hard clipping algorythm. much like what RK said, it takes your sine wave and, to a varying degree based on the particular distortion, converts it to a square wave. it's much like what a tremolo set to "completely on/off" does to your volume, except instead of fluctuation your volume, it treats the signal itself, which results in much stronger levels of sustain.

fuzz = a different flavor of distortion, same concept, different components in many cases. and as you can imagine, it sounds "fuzzy." to be clear, fuzz doesn't mean your tone goes to crap. Hendrix often used fuzz, if that helps.

delay vs. echo:
I saw a similar example to this once, so I'll try to re-create it for your needs:

"DELAY-DELay-Delay-delay"

"ECHO-Cho-o"

work for ya?
#10
it'd be cool to have a standard delay pedal that was "smart" and varied the time and feedback based on attacks!

...just a thought.
#11
Quote by GrisKy

"DELAY-DELay-Delay-delay"

"ECHO-Cho-o"


Haha... nice one.

I tried translating what I hear ... into words.. which didn't quite work out.
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#13
Quote by GrisKy
it'd be cool to have a standard delay pedal that was "smart" and varied the time and feedback based on attacks!

...just a thought.

The Q-Tron Envelope Filter does something similar to this, doesn't it?
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#14
Quote by tubetime86
The Q-Tron Envelope Filter does something similar to this, doesn't it?


Yes, but it varies a tonal sweep instead of a delay.

It's basically an auto-wah.

There are delay units out there that do this, and can even read picking speed and match (or mismatch) delay time to the tempo, but I've never used one. I'm talking studio grade rack units.
#15
OH! you know what else would be cool? an attack dependant delay that, on the low end of an adjustable threshold, switched to an echo-type effect! like:

"DE-De-del-dela-delay-lay-lay-ay..."