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#1
i'm new to bass, and i picked it up because i loved the sound of it, but i dont know who are considered bass legends, i want to know who they are, and i dont just wanna see some names, id like to know about their styles, and what you think about them

thx alot
#2
Sid Vicious was probably the tightest, most musically advanced bassist of all time.
Most consistent and nicest sounding tone of any bass player.
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#5
Quote by HammettHead
Sid Vicious was probably the tightest, most musically advanced bassist of all time.
Most consistent and nicest sounding tone of any bass player.

LOL

legendary bass players for me are

Cliff Burton
Mike Dirnt
Chris #2
John Entwhistle

theres more but cba naming more LMAO
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#6
ITT: People name their favourite bassists...

A legitimate legend was James Jamerson. He expanded popular bass playing from simple walking and root-fifth lines into melodic, syncopated basslines. He was the session bassist on practically every motown record until the early 70s, and his style basically made the Motown sound. The only way he'd have been more of a legend is if he expanded his technical repertoire a bit more, since that was one of the reasons why he eventually was unable to find session work.

Another- Billy Sheehan. Took the bass and managed to turn it into a lead instrument in the days of shred guitar. A lot of bassists from the shred era were very, very talented, but Billy took it one step further. Brilliant grasp of technique, and whilst his flamboyant playing may not be to everyone's tastes, the man knows when to hold back. Without doubt one of the best rock and roll bassists to ever have lived. Not a bad singer to boot.
#7
I really like
Juan Alderate - The Mars Volta
Flea - The Red Hot Chilli Peppers (typical but he is really good)
Fat mike - Nofx
Matt Freeman - Rancid
The Bass in ska is very prominant and very nice to listen to, i'd reccomend giving "Streetlight manifesto" a listen and hear some of what the bassist is doing.
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#8
Going to go with
James Jamerson - pretty much what del said
Jaco Pastorius - Changed bass in the eyes of the public from being a exclusively band instrument to a solo instrument.
Miles Davis - Not really a bass player but his compositions shape the way many jazz bassists play.
#9
Quote by HammettHead
Sid Vicious was probably the tightest, most musically advanced bassist of all time.
Most consistent and nicest sounding tone of any bass player.


I have a sneaking suspicion he's kidding.

Every genre of music has its legends and trendsetters. Ron Carter in Jazz, Jaco Pastorius in Jazz/Fusion, James Jamerson in Motown / R&B, Bootsy Collins in Funk, etc. In rock, there are literally dozens of them. John Entwistle of the Who, Geddy Lee of Rush, Chris Squire of Yes, Cliff Burton of Metallica, Billy Sheehan of Mr. Big and Talas, Lemmy of Motorhead, Paul McCartney of some unknown Liverpool band called the Beatles... the list goes on and on.

Each of these players has made a massive contribution to their musical genres, as well as to music in general. Some are more technically proficient than others. Some were more technically proficient than their playing often let on, but they decided to serve the song and the band rather than to play blisteringly fast runs all of the time and showcase their speed. They and a thousand others are well worth listening to and studying.

Rock on, my friend.
#10
Quote by FatalGear41
I have a sneaking suspicion he's kidding.


.

yup xD sid vicious wsa so bad he wasnt even plugged into the amp half the time from what Johhny Rotten said anyway.And im pretty sure he didnt do any recording on albums not entirely sure bout that tho.

One could say his sound was the most invisible xD he was a piss poor bassist but was a legend in his own rights
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#11
Check out the BPotM in the archives for really in-depth stuff. A search for favourite bassist or whatever would be good too.

Personally, I enjoy Jack Bruce, Flea, anyone from Jamiroquai (Zender, Fyffe, Turner. Hopefully the other two are right ) Wolstenhome, though his stuff seems to be a lot of octive + fuzz these days. Any old funk guy, really.
#13
Phil Lynott anyone?
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#14
I personally like listening to Les Claypool, Geddy Lee and Sir Horace Panter.
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#15
the most popular ones I'd say are:
Marcus Miller
Jaco Pastorius
James Jamerson
Jack Bruce
John Paul Jones
Victor Wooten
Steve Harris
Flea
John Entwistle
Les Claypool
Chris Wolstenholme
Geddy Lee
Bootsy Collins
Alex Webster
and for some reason, Paul McCartney and Cliff Burton.

I probably missed quite a few.
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#17
John Entwhistle
James Jamerson
Geddy Lee
Marcus Miller
Stanley Clarke
Les Claypool
Matt Freeman ( for punk :p )
Pastorius ^^
Trujillo ( In Infectious groove for sure )
John Myung
Mark King
Last edited by Natsuka at Nov 11, 2009,
#20
yay!
I like Ue-Chan from Maximum the Hormone aswell. Doesn't quite match up to legends though.
He's just, you know, a legend in being a freak.
#22
Legends of bass. Hmm. Ben is right this is going to really depend on your age, your favourites and your musical knowledge and tastes. And in the case of some, death and time have softened the critical blow and perhaps made us a bit more kind. But that aside, here is my list:

Duck Dunn: Duck played with Booker T and the MGs, which was the house band for the legendary Stax records of the 1960s. Ducks lines sound deceptively simple but the man showed us it wasn't just what you played but how you played. The king of pocket playing and groove.

James Jamerson
during his lifetime he was an anonymous session player. After his death, we all realized that as Ben has said above, he was the sound of Motown. Check out Standing in the Shadows of Motown. Every R & B and funk player owns tonnes to Jamerson.

John Entwistle, Jack Bruce and John Paul Jones All of these boys pushed rock bass playing into a whole new area in the 1960s and 70s. In their own ways they took those root fifths of lore and expanded rock bass playing into pentatonic driven/blues influenced glories. These three showed that bass could dominate as well as guitar in the land of rock.

Larry Graham The man invented slap bass as we know it and pushed funk into the land of top 40 with his funky lines behind Sly and Family Stone. He influenced everyone from Louis Johnson to Les Claypool.

Those should keep you busy for a while...
#23
If you forgot to mention them, I'd say they're not a legend.

If people who aren't musicians haven't heard of them, I wouldn't class them as a legend.
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#24
I love how only a couple people have mentioned Jaco.
Also, Marcus Miller-Great Jazz Fusion player and composer/arranger. Also plays bass clarinet, in case anyone wanted to know.

Stanley Clarke- Just awesome all around. Has also scored at least one movie that I can remember. Can't remember the name, but Wesley Snipes was in it, and the music was great. Has a rather particular style/technique. Here are a couple videos of him

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Py3jT0uaZw0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrav_MSMjNs

Rufus Reid-Jazz player, I believe he is almost exclusively an upright player. Has played with more jazz legends than there are pieces of hay in a haystack.
Last edited by Halakar at Nov 11, 2009,
#25
I would say some legends would be

James Jamerson: i think it's been explained enough

Jaco Pastorious: really took playing the bass into a different direction and was very influential on people like victor Wooten

Stanley Clarke: just a great player

Geddy Lee: one of, if not the best rock music bass player
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#26
To educate both myself and TS, would anyone mind telling me the pronunciation of Jaco Pastorius?

Is it:
Jock-o

or

Jay-ko?

That would help immensely. In the 6 months I've listened to him and the year and a half I've been playing bass, I still don't know.
#28
I've always heard jock-o. But then again, a couple thousand miles of difference in location will do that.
#30
eh... how about Jeff Berlin and Michael Manring?

Berlin is just a fucking beast

Michael Manring is definitely a legend. WHO on earth would switch tuning several, several times in ONE song? Michael Manring, that's who.
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#31
legendary bassists could be:

Jaco Pastorius because he was like the Jimmi Hendrix of bass
Larry Graham he invented Slap
Billy Sheehan the Van Halen of bass
John Entwistle - first bass solo evah
Stanley Clarke he improved the use of slap IMO
#32
Quote by NakedBassist
eh... how about Jeff Berlin and Michael Manring?

Berlin is just a fucking beast

Michael Manring is definitely a legend. WHO on earth would switch tuning several, several times in ONE song? Michael Manring, that's who.


I wouldn't call Manring a bass legend. Innovator, yes. Unique, yes. But legend no. Just like I wouldn't call Yves Carbonne or Jean Baudin legends. Sure, they do fantastic things, but have they really changed anything in the broader sense? I don't think so. Certainly not to the levels of Jaco, Larry Graham, Sheehan or Jamerson.
#33
Quote by Deliriumbassist
I wouldn't call Manring a bass legend. Innovator, yes. Unique, yes. But legend no.


I'm not sure about this. Michael Manring probably hasn't put many basses in the hands of aspiring new players (for one thing, his Zon Hyperbass costs a freaking fortune) but he has certainly done more than any other bassist to introduce altered tunings into the music - particularly for bass as a solo instrument. He has changed the way bassists approach their instrument. Therefore, I agree with you and would place him in the category of a great innovator. As for being a bass legend, he is indeed a legend, but only among bass players; just as Allan Holdsworth is a guitar legend only among guitar players. A niche legend is still legendary, isn't he?

God knows I'd love to own a Hyperbass someday - even if I can't play it like Manring.
Last edited by FatalGear41 at Nov 11, 2009,
#34
Guys that should of been mentioned by now..


Geezer Butler
Sad that he hasn't been mentioned yet. He's a god damn legend. F u cking monster tone and danceable bass goodness.

Pete Way
Probably the most influential bassist in rock

Glenn Hughes
Amazing funky, soul, R&B rock bassist. Also has the greatest voice on the planet. Seriously he makes James Brown sound like Corey Taylor.

Tim Bogert
Did some f u cking amazing work as the bassist for Vanilla Fudge

Sting
Do I really need to explain this one?

Lothar Heimberg
Original Scorpions bassist. A beast. Imagine if you took Jaco, Entwistle, Bruce and and a bunch of black guys, killed them, grinded up their corpese and reanimated them into one f u cking monster. Shit, he should of been someone because I honestly think he was the most technically proficient bass player I ever heard. He ended up quiting music and got a job at the local power plant in Hannover.
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#35
Quote by Nutter_101
If you forgot to mention them, I'd say they're not a legend.

If people who aren't musicians haven't heard of them, I wouldn't class them as a legend.
Yeah, but honestly, most non-musicians only care about the singers and maybe the guitarist in bands. I mean, does someone who play Guitar Hero ever talk about even someone in an incredibly popular band like Entwistle? Not really...
#36
Quote by Steve08
Yeah, but honestly, most non-musicians only care about the singers and maybe the guitarist in bands. I mean, does someone who play Guitar Hero ever talk about even someone in an incredibly popular band like Entwistle? Not really...


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#37
And none of these musicians are supernatural or mythical, so none are legends.

HAH! I win this thread!

... I'm such a killjoy http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=legend
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#38
Quote by Deliriumbassist
I wouldn't call Manring a bass legend. Innovator, yes. Unique, yes. But legend no.


I see your point, but Maichael Manring's talent will never not be legendary to myself. To me, it's borderline inconceivable to switch tunings once during a song, but this???? Are you freaking shitting me? how???
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#40
How bout some bassists in the less traditional (jazz) spectrum

Of the best rock/alt bassists in the world, I think everone would agree that Flea and Les Claypool are probably the gods of their domain.


I seriously reccomend both. Flea is just freaking amazing, and while Les Claypool is very weird, I seriously think he's one of the best bassists to ever walk the planet.
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