#1
In my on-going quest for the perfect amp, I've come across something I can find very little decent info on. Two amps I've fallen in love with - a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe combo and an Epiphone SoCal 50 head - both apparently have solid state rectifiers.
Now, I have next to zero amp knowledge. These amps both sounded great to me when I was trying them out, but then I didn't have my usual pedal board with me, I wasn't using my main guitar and I've no clue what the cab was the Epiphone was running through. I didn't exactly have much time to fully mess with every single setting either. So although they sounded great to me at the time, I fully accept they might not be so good in the long run - which is why I'm trying to do my research.
But all the info I can find on solid state rectifiers is one of two things. Either it waffles on for several paragraphs about technical amp stuff that I can't even begin to understand yet or it just says they're crap with no explanation why.

So, could someone please explain, in as simple English as possible, why solid state rectifiers are different from any other, what their pros/cons are and why I may or may not want one?

For reference I'm just looking for something for fairly straight-forward Foo Fighters, AC/DC, Jaggedy Ann, Paramore type rock tones, nothing ultra-heavy or jazzy or whatever. I also tend to use a fair amount of pedals (I won't go anywhere without at least one EQ), in case that matters in terms of rectifiers or whatever.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#2
Don't be an idiot and fall into the trap of thinking that any solid state device is bad. Just don't. Solid state rectifiers are, if anything, better for several reasons. They have a faster response than tube rectifiers, more durable and don't require extra maintenace. Tube rectifiers will just give you a looser, saggier tone that will cost you extra money every time you have to retube. Unless you reeeaaalllyyyy like having a slightly saggier tone, then there is no point in only looking at amps with tube rectifiers.

╠═══════╬═══════╣

THE SINE WAVE SURFER σƒ τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ

╠═══════╬═══════╣


[quote="'[BurnTheDusk"]']Boss pedals may be built like tanks but I would rather buy a cardboard box that is on my side than pay for a tank that is working against me.
#3
Quote by Dr.Pain-MD
Don't be an idiot and fall into the trap of thinking that any solid state device is bad.



+ 10000

Its in the power supply, not the signal path. The affect on tone is minimal, and a solid state rectifier is a lot more reliable.
Last edited by Matt420740 at Nov 11, 2009,
#4
^^ yeah, thats pretty much what i was thinking. solid state rectifiers are fine, and are actually better for some styles (hard rock, metal, or anything with lots of gain). tube rectifiers have a completly different feel to them and ive always felt were better for stuff with light gain, like some mildly overdriven stuff (blues in particular).

if you really want to get a feel for the difference play an amp that has both. for example, the mesa stiletto ace has the option to switch between diode and tube rectifiers. a good way to get a feel for them is to play the amp on one, then switch. if you cant/dont want to do that, then you probably shouldnt worry about it since it isnt as big a deal as people try to make it seem. most tube amps have SS rectifiers, so its not like its a bad thing.
#5
The rectifier doesn't have THAT much to do with tone, to be honest, and no, a solid state rectifier does not make an amp a hybrid.

Go with whatever sounds good.
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
What the hell is a G&L.



Quote by Flux'D
Gay & Lesbian I think, the box smelled funny
Greg what did you send me??
#7
Quote by Matt420740


Its in the power supply, not the signal path. The affect on tone is minimal, and a solid state rectifier is a lot more reliable.


This.
#8
Uh-huh. I did think they both sounded great when I tried them, I actually am more used to entirely valve amps but I couldn't relaly tell a difference in tone other than these two were a little easier to get exactly where I wanted them. I only asked at all because when I started looking around I saw a lot of people (seemingly blindly) hating them for no given reason and I wondered why that might be.

But hey-ho, if there's no technical reason against them then I'll probably be buying one of 'em pretty sharpish then.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#9
the one thing i will say is this: it isnt all about the tone. a tube rectifier will feel different when you play an amp with one. its a subtle thing, but when the amp reacts differently to how you play, that is just as important as how an amp sounds. people forget that about about tubes in other parts of the amp as well. so while it isnt a huge deal for the most part or for most people, tube rectfiers do have a purpose and they shouldnt be thrown out completly just because silicon rectifiers are more reliable and such.