#1
ok, say we are using a C base for a chord. C D G is a Sus2, and C F G is a Sus 4. if you had C G A *using C as the chord name* would you call it Csus6? being that there is no third, and possibly the A suspends the chord a bit? if rearranged, A C G is Amin7(no5) but was just wondering if there is a possibility of there being a Sus6 chord. if not, what would you call it?
Schecter C-1 Classic in Seethru blue <333
Schecter Damien FR
Roland AC-60 acoustic amp
Boss GE-7 EQ
Line6 Ubermetal Distortion
Sigma Dx Acoustic
#2
I do not believe there is a such thing as a suspended 6th chord.

I would call it an inversion of Am7(no5), but I suppose a C5add6 would work too.
Dissonance is Bliss


Signal Chain:
Carvin CT-4
Ibanez TS-9
Carvin Quad-X
TC Electronics G-Major
Mesa/Boogie 2:90
Ear Candy BuzzBomb



Member #4 of the Carvin Club
#3
Quote by Doodleface
I do not believe there is a such thing as a suspended 6th chord.

I would call it an inversion of Am7(no5), but I suppose a C5add6 would work too.
This. To the best of my knowledge you can't suspend the third more than a step.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#5
Quote by griffRG7321
It's Am7


This.

A lot of people don't know WHY they're called suspended chords. It's because chords with suspensions were originally intended to resolve. For example, a chord with a suspended fourth would resolve to that same chord with a major third. A chord with a suspended second would generally resolve up a half step with a minor third. Knowing this, there is nothing for the 6 to resolve to, so you wouldn't call it a 'suspended' chord.

The correct name for that chord is, indeed, Am7. Fifths are omitted from chords quite frequently, and I see no reason to notate that chord with C as the root, unless there something else going on in the music to imply that it is, indeed, a C chord.
#6
yeah, was just wondering what itd be if voiced in C, but alright, thanks guys
Schecter C-1 Classic in Seethru blue <333
Schecter Damien FR
Roland AC-60 acoustic amp
Boss GE-7 EQ
Line6 Ubermetal Distortion
Sigma Dx Acoustic
#7
voiced with a C in the bass it's an inverted Am7 or Am7/C (Am7 chord over C bass note). Then you're just not voicing the fifth.

EDIT: You could call it a Csus6 though - I don't see the harm but maybe C6(no3) might be better. Not sure
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Nov 12, 2009,
#8
C5add13 if its imperative that you name it as a C chord. It will still sound like an Am7 though. sus6 doesn't exist.
#9
It really depends on how the chord is functioning compared to the chords around it. The A may be functioning as merely a color tone if you are not hearing it lead to anything in particular.
#10
I go by the rule that only sus2 and sus4 chords exist (given there is no 3rd). Anything else is an add chord of some kind.
404: Sig not found.
Last edited by ChrisN at Nov 13, 2009,
#11
I think using sus6 is illogical and lame and now I am going to explain why...

Sus stands for suspension. Classically, suspension is a tone which is held from the previous chord and resolves down by step to the nearest chord tone of the chord in question (speaking of traditional tertian harmony). It has melodic or contrapuntal origin. Upward resolving suspensions are called retardations. As we know historically, dissonances were first prepared and resolved, and with time composers began treating them more freely. Same happened to suspensions and at some point people stopped resolving them, which resulted in the autonomic sus chords as we know them today (sus2 and sus4). Having said that, 6 is obviously not a suspension in relation to 3, but a nonsense. The only logical meaning of sus6, following from the 6-5 suspension, would be a chord with a root, third, sixth and without a fifth, which is actually a first inversion chord:
Csus6 = A/C.
Last edited by Kenam at Dec 22, 2009,