#1
Hello

I´m trying to write a acoustic song. with just one acoustic guitar.
How do i get it not to sound boring. its sound kinda repeating now.

THANKS
#2
Mixing in some complex chords is one way. A good vocal melody will help. Also don't use a really common progression, those get boring.
#3
Find some good chord voicings - some open strings, open tunings, maybe a capo. By arranging the notes differently, you can make basic chord progressions sound a lot better.

Also contrast dynamics between sections (loud/quiet/loud etc).
#4
an interesting strum pattern always helps on top of Giraffe's suggestions
#5
some multiple-fingerpicking, different chords, and harmonizing vocals!!!
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#6
Well, there are a lot of ways:

I like adding extentions to the chord every now and than f.e. C -Major --> Cadd9

Another way is to use chord substitution. I give you an example


I II III IV V VI VIII VIII
C Dm Em F G Am Hdim C


The most common substitutions are:

I --> VI
IV-->II
Sometimes you can use V ---> III depends on how it sounds and it's not really an "academic" substitution.

of course this is also possible the other way around.
#8
Well as much as I don't know about guitar theory (but am working hard to get there) I would say it depends on many things. Often adding different picking/strumming techniques can add a world of difference. I would say trying adding hammer-ons pull offs as well. Good luck.
#9
Quote by rolandgunner
Well, there are a lot of ways:

I like adding extentions to the chord every now and than f.e. C -Major --> Cadd9

Another way is to use chord substitution. I give you an example


I II III IV V VI VIII VIII
C Dm Em F G Am Hdim C


The most common substitutions are:

I --> VI
IV-->II
Sometimes you can use V ---> III depends on how it sounds and it's not really an "academic" substitution.

of course this is also possible the other way around.


When using roman numerals for chords, it's important to remember... Minor chords are notated with lowercase numerals (ii is a minor chord built off the second scale degree, while II would be major). When notating a diminished chord, you'd use lowercase with an 'o' (viio). If you want to notate a half-diminished seventh, replace the 'o' with an 'o' with a slash through it. It's a symbol, cba to find it right now. There is no VIII chord. That's a I.
#10
Also, when playing simple chords, don't just strum away. Try doing some hamerons and pull offs within the chord. You could also try to incorperate a simple bassline with the low strings. Just make sure to change it up and experiment.
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#11
These recomendations are great, but I believe their is an easier fix. Usually the cause of "boringness" is that something becomes static. This gives the listener the sensation of being in one place. To remedy this all you need to do is add motion or direction. I often like to think of this as moving between tension and stability. Try adding something that contrasts with what you already have. This contrast creates a relationship between the two sections. The nature of this relationship will effect how tense and stable the different elements seem, whether it be melodically, harmonically, rhymically, dynamically or timbrely.