#1
The stuff I write when I'm coming up with heavy songs is always in constantly changing timings. It is how I like to write. I don't know why. Our drummer has a lot of trouble playing to this and the other guitarist also has a lot of difficulty learning the parts. Should I force myself to keep to one timing or should I try to get the rest of the band to figure out how to play with my strange timings?

I have a lot of difficulty writing parts that are interesting when I try to stick to a timing, so I'm not sure what to do.
#2
I have trouble writing in anything but 4/4 time. But i'd tell them to man up and learn the new times. That would workout better in the long run.
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#3
why don't you right music as a band so everyone plays the parts they wrote? it seems like a no-brainer to me...
#5
Quote by JayLacelle
why don't you right music as a band so everyone plays the parts they wrote? it seems like a no-brainer to me...


Everything is written by myself and one of the other guitarists. We either come up specifically with the other parts, or tell them what type of thing they should do.
#7
Another thing you could do is tab it out on guitar pro and send everyone the files. That's what I do with my band and it seems to make it alot easier if they can actually hear the song being played out.
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#8
Quote by jfreyvogel
Everything is written by myself and one of the other guitarists. We either come up specifically with the other parts, or tell them what type of thing they should do.


well then tell them they should start taking part in the songwriting process and to stop being a couple of free-loaders
#9
If you're aware of what time signature(s) you're using than what you're doing is fine, although if the other musicians you're playing with can't handle it, I would recommend playing things that they can play as well.

If you're not aware of what time signature(s) you're using, than you should work on getting very used to 4/4, by playing with loops in 4/4 and by always playing to a metronome or recording, until you can actually write in 4/4.

Ideally you'll be able to play in any time signature that you want to.
#10
Quote by isaac_bandits
If you're aware of what time signature(s) you're using than what you're doing is fine, although if the other musicians you're playing with can't handle it, I would recommend playing things that they can play as well.

If you're not aware of what time signature(s) you're using, than you should work on getting very used to 4/4, by playing with loops in 4/4 and by always playing to a metronome or recording, until you can actually write in 4/4.

Ideally you'll be able to play in any time signature that you want to.


I guess I just need to learn time signatures better. It is difficult for me to tell what I am playing in because of how frequently I change things up, and the oddity of some of the timings I use to begin with. I actually played out a riff for my guitar teacher to figure out the timing, just like a 20 second part, and it took him about 10 minutes to figure out the timings.
#11
Quote by jfreyvogel
I guess I just need to learn time signatures better. It is difficult for me to tell what I am playing in because of how frequently I change things up, and the oddity of some of the timings I use to begin with. I actually played out a riff for my guitar teacher to figure out the timing, just like a 20 second part, and it took him about 10 minutes to figure out the timings.


The problem, is you need to be able to play something simple before trying this complex stuff. When you don't know what time signature its in, it seems like you just play some notes in whatever timing you feel like, and have no concept of what signature you're using.

Force yourself to write long sections in one time signature (that you know), and then once your comfortable with that, try and add complexity.
#12
get a better band
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#13
Turn off your distortion, switch to the neck pickup, and get your drummer some brushes. That'll help your sound a lot. Maybe toss some chorus on there, a bit of reverb. Oh, and don't use scales so much.
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#14
Quote by isaac_bandits
The problem, is you need to be able to play something simple before trying this complex stuff. When you don't know what time signature its in, it seems like you just play some notes in whatever timing you feel like, and have no concept of what signature you're using.

Force yourself to write long sections in one time signature (that you know), and then once your comfortable with that, try and add complexity.



I know what I'm doing - but I know intuitively. I can play in any timing, I just don't know what to call it. And I can play things both simple and complex that sound good. When I write music I am very meticulous in my composition. I am only better at writing in different time signatures - because I find it to be more interesting. When I come up with something in a single timing it just sounds I guess undeveloped. However my band mates have difficulty when I write music normally.
#15
Quote by woodenbandman
Turn off your distortion, switch to the neck pickup, and get your drummer some brushes. That'll help your sound a lot. Maybe toss some chorus on there, a bit of reverb. Oh, and don't use scales so much.


We're a metal band - so with the exception of a few instrumental songs I wrote in all clean, we usually use heavy distortion.

My solo work is almost all in the type of setup you just described, but this issue doesnt apply there since its just me.

How do you comment on using or not using scales? You haven't heard me play so what are you basing this on?
#16
hmmm well i'm kinda in the same situation my friend and all i can say is either start writing easier songs until your drummer and crap catch up to your playing(if they ever do),or just let the other guitarist write the simple songs and just work on those for awhile.Keep working on your own songs maybe one day you'll find someone who can play them
#17
Quote by jfreyvogel
I know what I'm doing - but I know intuitively. I can play in any timing, I just don't know what to call it. And I can play things both simple and complex that sound good. When I write music I am very meticulous in my composition. I am only better at writing in different time signatures - because I find it to be more interesting. When I come up with something in a single timing it just sounds I guess undeveloped. However my band mates have difficulty when I write music normally.


Do you know what you're doing in terms that other people will understand, or just in ways that you understand? I have a hard time believing some one that would be asking a forum how he can play with a band, would actually understand time signatures well enough to be able to write a song using them. Just because your guitar part has them, and it sounds cool, that doesn't mean you understand them, and can explain them. Intuitively understanding them sounds like bullshit to me. Understanding them would be knowing how many bars of what time signature you're using an being able to tell people that. If you can't do that, you're just throwing random stuff together and calling it 'complex'. I used to play in all kinds of weird time signatures when I first tried writing stuff, and then I started playing with a metronome, and was actually able to play with a band and write things that others could play along with. Eventually I've been able to start using other time signatures as I get comfortable, but for the most part I don't write a song that uses a new signature in each bar.
#18
You can write stuff together as a band, which would be cooler.
Or you can continue writing stuff in stranger timings, however i think you should record it and put it on cd, send to the whole band. they can use it as a sort of backing track.
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