#1
After about a year of playing, I want to make my first improv, but it will just be some basic 7th chords for the progression, nothing too fancy. So, what scales are best for solos?
Amps:
Fender Frontman 15r

Guitars:
Epiphone Dot Studio
Squier Strat

Pedals:
Crybaby Original Wah
Boss DS-1
#4
Chromatic is my favorite scale. I tend to use it quite often. Just take the 12-tone scale and knock off the bits you don't like. That sounds best.
#5
So I'm gonna pick a mode and stick with it? Will I have to do that for the whole song or change(if I want to) for each individual solo?
Amps:
Fender Frontman 15r

Guitars:
Epiphone Dot Studio
Squier Strat

Pedals:
Crybaby Original Wah
Boss DS-1
#6
bebop dominant and modes.

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#7
Quote by SecretAgentS
So I'm gonna pick a mode and stick with it? Will I have to do that for the whole song or change(if I want to) for each individual solo?


You follow the chords. If you're asking these questions I think you need to go and do a whole load of research into jazz soloing.
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#8
Quote by SecretAgentS
After about a year of playing, I want to make my first improv, but it will just be some basic 7th chords for the progression, nothing too fancy. So, what scales are best for solos?
Ignore modes until you are completely and utterly comfortable with the Major scale!

If you are just starting to improvise I wouldn't worry about jazz just yet either - I'd go for a blues progression and pentatonic scales to start with.

If you don't know any scales yet, I'd start with learning to play the minor pentatonic in first position, so you have something to base your improv off, but start learning the Major scale so you understand how it is constructed.

Pretty much any scale (or mode) that you will ever need can be derived from the major scale, so learn it so you understand it in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), notes (eg C Maj = C D E F G A B) and intervals (root, maj 2nd, maj 3rd, perfect 4th...), and recognise how it sounds, and all the other scales will be relatively easy, as you can just relate them back to the Major scale.
#9
Quote by m3tal_R3dn3ck
Modes will be your best friends.


no they bloody well won't.

TS, long term you want to be learning about diatonic harmony, ie learn the major scale and how it works, the intervals it contains, how to construct chords etc. That's an ongoing project though.

However, if you just want to get something that sounds ok with the minimum of effort learn the shapes of the minor pentatonic scale and transpose it around to whichever key you're in. Blues is the best place to start, get a blues backing track in A and play around with A minor pentatonic over it. Just make a note to take the time to learn why that scale works a little further in the future.

Don't even bother looking at modes, maybe worry about them in a year or two.
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#10
i would definately recommend learning some licks or your favorite jazz artists...here's a site that I use which has licks from a bunch of traditional jazz artists http://jazzguitar.yolasite.com/jazz-licks.php. Learning licks can be easier than learning scales.

Another useful tool are backing tracks which you can jam over all day...the same site as above has a huuuge list of studio quality backing tracks that were actually played by humans...not midi. here's the link for backing tracks: http://jazzguitar.yolasite.com/backing-tracks.php

-hope this helps