#1
How much tube amp wattage is needed to be heard in a band practice setting (in a garage with another guitarist, drummer, bassist, and vocalist). How much would be too loud?
Gear:
PRS SE Custom
Takamine G Series Acoustic
Peavey Vypyr 30
Digitech RP 250

Quote by voodoochild23
The only time I'll dance is if Nickelback caught fire and no one helped.
#2
On average its around 30 watts tube. However you must keep in mind that wattage =/= volume, necessarily (although higher wattage amps tend to be louder because they are more powerful).

Wattage = power/headroom (how loud of a signal the amp can produce before it reaches clipping stages).

An amps volume is determined more by its circuitry.
#3
The general rule that I go by is 15 watts if you just want distortion, 30 watts if you need cleans. This isn't always correct though, I_am_metalhead is right with his post. It depends on the circuitry, speakers, etc.

-Gibson LP VM
-Silvertone Kentucky Blue
-MXR CC Delay
-Ibanez TS-9
-Egnater Rebel 20
-Avatar 1x12

My rig is simple
Haha. UG's Chuck just said chuck. haha
You're not truly playing guitar unless you know theory.
#4
What are the other people in the band using? If your guitarist has a 100-watt RMS Marshall SLP with a 4x10 cabinet, your bassist has some 1000-watt RMS monster with an 8x10 cabinet and your drummer bashes his drums like he is beating an elephant to death with a baseball bat, you'll probably need between 50 and 100 watts RMS. If your band has smaller equipment, you could get away with 30 watts RMS and a 2x12 cabinet. It depends on what kind of gear the rest of the band has and at what volume levels you play. Amplifier and cabinet efficiency are definitely factors in just how loud any particular amplifier / cabinet will be.
#5
ok what is RMS?
Gear:
PRS SE Custom
Takamine G Series Acoustic
Peavey Vypyr 30
Digitech RP 250

Quote by voodoochild23
The only time I'll dance is if Nickelback caught fire and no one helped.
#7
Quote by prsrulz91
ok what is RMS?


Literally, "Root Mean Square." It is a standard means of determining an amplifier's power. This was adopted largely as opposed to rating an amplifier in "Peak Power," which measure only the highest power output that the amp can produce; if only for a second.

Tech-heads will claim that there is no such thing as RMS as applied to amplifiers and will cite the fact that the U.S. standard IHF A202 is no longer is use; that one is not actually measuring the amp's power; that the power measured is proportional to the Mean Square rather than the Root Mean Square; blah, blah, blah. Unless you build amplifiers for a living, this hyper-technical foray into meaningless obscurity is absurd. The industry and musicians use RMS as a standard, even if it is not technically appropriate. It works for its purpose.

In short, a 100-watt amplifier measured in "Peak Power" might be only 30 watts or so, but might hit 100 watts for a moment or two. The RMS is meant to convey the amplifier's constant output power. That's all you need to know, unless you plan to become an audio engineer.