#1
Hi there im currently doing a project at university and one of the tasks is to create something in odd time signatures picked at random, and i ended up with 23/8 and 29/8 o_0

so i was just wondering if anyone can suggest some songs with really high time signatures so i can somehow get a handle on this.

Cheer Carl.
#3
Yes i have checked some of them out but im mainly looking for rock/metal type stuff as appose the more traditional music..
#5
i dont think any music in the past 100 years have used those...your best bet is to look for classical
#6
I don't think most (or any) bands would really write or think in time signatures that high. For example, instead of 29/8 they might play three measures of 4/4 and one in 5/8. Just a note.
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#9
Iron Maiden use some weird time sigs, but not as crazy as 29/8.
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#10
Quote by Carl_Martin
Hi there im currently doing a project at university and one of the tasks is to create something in odd time signatures picked at random, and i ended up with 23/8 and 29/8 o_0

so i was just wondering if anyone can suggest some songs with really high time signatures so i can somehow get a handle on this.

Cheer Carl.


Why don't you pick something that is more consistent with common practice, like 9/8 or 5/4?
shred is gaudy music
#11
Quote by GuitarMunky
Why don't you pick something that is more consistent with common practice, like 9/8 or 5/4?

They were picked at random. He got 23/8 & 29/8.
#12
Quote by Antis0cial
Dance of Eternity


That does use some wierd time signatures but nothing that high. It goes up to about 14/16 i think, but constantly changes so as a total it could come to something that high (at one point it changes every bar)
#13
March of the Pigs by Nine Inch Nails is in 29/8. Well, some argue that it's actually three bars of 7/8 followed by a bar of 4/4, but semantics at that point.

Or, you could take this approach:
Attachments:
one-measure-longtpfd.gif
#14
Really the best way to go about it is to clump the notes together into larger beats such as quarter notes and dotted quarter notes. You could think of your 29/8 as having 9 dotted quarter notes and 1 quarter note (they dont have to be in that order). But yeah, I would say clump the smaller pulses into larger groups. That will help you get a handle on them.

Oh and by the way there is ALOT of music written especially in the last 100 years that is written in odd time signatures.
#15
Really the best way to go about it is to clump the notes together into larger beats such as quarter notes and dotted quarter notes. You could think of your 29/8 as having 9 dotted quarter notes and 1 quarter note (they dont have to be in that order). But yeah, I would say clump the smaller pulses into larger groups. That will help you get a handle on them.

Oh and by the way there is ALOT of music written especially in the last 100 years that is written in odd time signatures.
#16
I think what I would do is break it down to "bars-within-bars."
Quote by GuerillaGorilla
...three bars of 7/8 followed by a bar of 4/4...

I think that's a pretty good way to look at it. "3 bars of 4/4 + 1 bar of 5/8" could also work, but I think the long pseudo-4/4 part would make it sound too conventional for such an unusual signature to be practical.

Actually, continuing in that line of thought, I think the best way to really make such a complex meter practical would be to avoid symmetry. If it sounds like 3 bars of 7/8 and 1 of 4/4, wouldn't you be better off just writing it that way? Personally I would avoid consecutive "bars-within-the-bar" with the same pseudo-meter. I would try something like

1 bar of 5/4
1 bar of 9/8
1 bar of 5/4

or if that's still too symmetrical

1 bar of 7/8
1 bar of 6/4
1 bar of 5/4

Quote by MusicThinker
Really the best way to go about it is to clump the notes together into larger beats such as quarter notes and dotted quarter notes. You could think of your 29/8 as having 9 dotted quarter notes and 1 quarter note (they dont have to be in that order). But yeah, I would say clump the smaller pulses into larger groups. That will help you get a handle on them.

This is a very good approach if you're not that comfortable with odd meters. Personally I think I prefer the other method because to me it seems to allow a little more freedom.

You could also use a combination of both of these methods, breaking the individual "bars-within-the-bar" down into it's own rhythm.