#1
This technique is KILLING ME. I've tried basic stuff like slowing it down and such, but I just can't get this down. Any advice?
My problem areas are synching the two hands, speeding it up, and muting when I go over more than three strings.
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#2
I don't understand how you can't sync it :s

Just keep playing it slowly till you get it, i guess.

If you struggle with synching at a slow speed, then maybe you should just not sweep?
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#3
When I first started learning this I first found a ton of patterns to practice (Theres a lesson on UG called "All the sweep arpeggios you'll ever need" or something like that). Print it out. Turn on the tv and put on something mindless and just roll through them without really paying attention. Do this for at least an hour a day. It should take about 2 weeks to have it down I think. Down as in OK, not like amazing or anything. The only thing that will fix your problems is constant practice. You have to put in the hours.
#5
Quote by GodofGuitar1991
Ive been able to sweep for like a year now and I still cant do it.


WTF? you've been able to but you cant? dont quite understand that one.
#6
Quote by jfreyvogel
Turn on the tv and put on something mindless and just roll through them without really paying attention.

Wrong.

If you actually want to get good at sweeping, sit alone in a quiet room, set your metronome away at annoyingly slow BPM, and set your amp up with a clean tone with absolutely no effects going at all, not even reverb.

Pay close attention to everything you're doing and takes things slow. It takes time before your hands can sync up as perfectly as people like Becker, Gambale and Batio.
#7
Dude, when everyone said "PLAY SLOW, JUST PRACTICE MAN, YOU JUST GOTTA PRACTICE EVERYDAY" I thought they were being pretentious, obnoxious, pricks.

Turns out they were right, when I learned how to sweep, it was almost like magic. I'd been practicing, with the aid of youtube videos of course, for about say 3-4 months? I don't really remember the time period, to be honest, because I've been high all year, and have lost my sense of time, BUT ANYWAYS...

One day, I just, swept. Seriously, I decided I was going to speed up after practicing slowly, and I was able to. Surely I didn't speed up on the first go 'round, but on my 3rd try, I was sweeping. I'm no Yngwie, and I STILL practice everyday for much longer than I'm sure most even play guitar, but thats what it takes bro.

Just keep practicing man...practice, slowly, practice, slowly...PRACTICE SLOWLY

That's for synchronization and speed though, for muting, which is still a problem for me you have 3 options:

the sock theory, where you simply tie a sock around the fretboard and go at it, which is good for practicing until you can actually sweep cleanly

...or the thumb concept, inwhich I've only seen about 2 people do well, where you sweep with your thumb laid across the strings to mute them, as in, as you sweep down you bring your thumb across each string as soon as you hit it to mute it.

You also have the slight dampening of the strings with palm muting, you just have to find that sweep spot on the bridge.

Just keep practicing though man, you'll get it!
#8
Quote by Rikki DeMartini
Wrong.

If you actually want to get good at sweeping, sit alone in a quiet room, set your metronome away at annoyingly slow BPM, and set your amp up with a clean tone with absolutely no effects going at all, not even reverb.

Pay close attention to everything you're doing and takes things slow. It takes time before your hands can sync up as perfectly as people like Becker, Gambale and Batio.



It was how I learned. I found that when I concentrated on doing it I would keep messing up but if my mind was elsewhere my hands would run through the exercises on muscle memory without mistakes.

It is also a technique recommended by the bassist Victor Wooten (The Music Lesson, By: Victor Wooten). I forget what he calls it, relaxed concentration or something like that. The idea is that you shouldn't have to think about doing it to actually do it. It is like speaking - you think about what you want to say, but to say it you don't have to think about the physical process of creating the sounds. It comes naturally.
Last edited by jfreyvogel at Nov 13, 2009,
#9
My problem areas are synching the two hands, speeding it up, and muting when I go over more than three strings.


That's pretty much all there is to it. Practice slowly and make sure you're doing all of the above correctly.

Repeat.

Read the damn stickies, also.