#1
does an acoustic guitar have intonation like when you change string gauges like an electric?

also has anyone tried electric strings on a acoustic say 10s or 11s?
#2
it also gets desintonated with the time but you can take it to a luthier so he caliber it (i don't know if you say it like that). and with those strings you are going to destroy the body a bridge of an acoustic
#3
Quote by whysky
it also gets desintonated with the time but you can take it to a luthier so he caliber it (i don't know if you say it like that). and with those strings you are going to destroy the body a bridge of an acoustic


Not really; electric strings are made for electric guitars because electric strings only need to be picked up by a pickup; acoustic strings actually need to be heard, so they're made differently. You can use electric strings on an acoustic; yes, you will have much less volume and tone (The Beatles did this; Listen to Twist and Shout; That's an acoustic-electric with electric strings.....with a soundhole pickup), and it will sound (to most guitarists) very poor.

Also, if you change gauges, you may have to change your intonation, which is (or should be) done by a luthier. They DO make .10s and .11s for acoustic gauges...but you'll still have to get your intonation changed most likely.
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#4
we use 10s or silk and steels on all our acoustic guitars, but they are acoustic guitar strings. we didn't have to change intonation on any of them when we changed to the lower tension strings, but on some (not all) of the guitars we did have to change the action and adjust the truss rod.
#5
It's unlikely that you would have intonation issues on an acoustic simply by changing string gauges, unless you change to a gauge that's a lot different than what the guitar is set up for. If the guitar is properly set up to begin with, as to action & intonation, then going from, say a 10 to an 11 set shouldn't make a difference.

If you go from a 10 to a 12 or 13, then it might bow the neck enough to cause high action and poor intonation, which would make it necessary to adjust the neck relief to accomodate the additional stress on the neck...make it flatter. Otherwise, fretted notes above the first 3 or 4 frets will sound sharp.

In general, you should look to the manufacturer's recommendation as to string gauge; a lot of players make the mistake of assuming that heavier strings will give you better tone and volume, but heavier strings may also dampen vibration in the guitar's top, giving a tighter sound and more volume, but less resonance, harmonics and "bloom".
Last edited by maxtheaxe at Nov 14, 2009,
#6
The whole electric strings not sounding right is true (on the wound strings end) because of the winding material. Electric guitars are strung with any variation of magnetic metals to be "picked up" by the magnetic pickups. Acoustic strings, however, are wound in bronze to give you a nice rich tone. Strings are such an important part of your acoustic's tone its not even funny.
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#7
The "electric strings" question comes up a lot; basically it's exactly what clayonfire and Natrone said. (By the way, the Beatles guitar clayonfire mentioned is kind of weird -- basically it's an acoustic in shape only.)


As far as string gauge, one well-known manufacturer says:
Can I use a heavier string gauge other than the Phosphor Bronze Lights you ship the guitars with?
Yes. You can go up or down one gauge, usually without needing to readjust your truss rod, however if you use a much heavier or lighter gauge this will put different amounts of tension on the neck so an adjustment may be needed. When changing string gauge allow some time for the guitar to settle and then if needed have the truss rod adjusted by a qualified technician.

Another suggests:
Strings - what kind should I use?
Tacoma Guitars are factory strung with D'Addario light gauge strings (.012 -.053). Switching to Medium gauge can be done however, it can put unnecessary stress on the bridge, saddle, nut, and may require a truss rod adjustment, re-cutting of the nut and/or a set-up for optimal playability. For simplicity's sake, we recommend continuing the use of light gauge strings.

Also note most guitars can only take so much tension -- a lot of Martin guitars, for example, have a sticker inside saying "Use medium or lighter strings only" (or something to that effect). Check what the manufacturer says, and/or ask at your local guitar store, before experimenting.
#8
hey everyone thx for the info.

The reason i was asking is i was looking for bend ability on an acoustic guitar like you would on an electric. I thought that electric strings would give a very thin sound, almost like you were picking the strings at the bridge type of sound.

Are you capable of getting a good tone on an acoustic and able to bend strings to?
Do you know of a string set or a good way to get this.



thx fret
Last edited by fretboard12 at Nov 14, 2009,
#9
Quote by fretboard12
hey everyone thx for the info.

The reason i was asking is i was looking for bend ability on an acoustic guitar like you would on an electric. I thought that electric strings would give a very thin sound, almost like you were picking the strings at the bridge type of sound.

Are you capable of getting a good tone on an acoustic and able to bend strings to?
Do you know of a string set or a good way to get this.

Look for extra lights. Martin makes a set that are very bendy; I use them on my Backpackers, which can't take any heavier gauge. They'll sound slightly thinner, because they are slightly thinner, but not as bad as an electric set.

Once you've played a while and built up finger strength, bends become a whole lot easier. I can do them now (in tune!) on my 12-string, which is a bit tricky because of the paired strings -- many people think it's impossible. The irony being I'm mostly a rhythm player and have absolutely no use for the sound myself.
#11
extra light d'addario phosphor bronze strings bend really well, and on the right guitar i get a lot more sound out of the bend than with some other strings. they work great on my seagulls, but i wouldn't go under 11's for larrivees as they have less space on the outsides of the strings and tend to go over the edge too easily.
#13
thx everyone great answers, This has been a great help.

those larrivees are some expensive pieces of wood.
#14
not really. they're mostly middle priced guitars.

goodalls run $4000 to over $6000 (and after you play them, you'll KNOW they're worth it!), and kathy wingert's basic starting price for a guitar is $8000. huss and daltons run $4000 and up, good martins and almost all bozeman gibsons run over $2000.

Quote by fretboard12
thx everyone great answers, This has been a great help.

those larrivees are some expensive pieces of wood.
#15
Quote by patticake
not really. they're mostly middle priced guitars.

goodalls run $4000 to over $6000 (and after you play them, you'll KNOW they're worth it!), and kathy wingert's basic starting price for a guitar is $8000. huss and daltons run $4000 and up, good martins and almost all bozeman gibsons run over $2000.



wow that's some money, to me anyway.

i read in another post were someone had said that guitarist are some of the cheapest people as far as spending money on there hobbies, and i kinda agree to me that amount of money for just a guitar alone seems too much but im sure that they play amazingly and sound the same.

and yet i think of other people's hobbies and it would take them thousands just to get started.you would be lucky if most guitar players have spent more than 4k in the time they have been playing.
Last edited by fretboard12 at Nov 14, 2009,
#16
Quote by fretboard12
wow that's some money, to me anyway.

i read in another post were someone had said that guitarist are some of the cheapest people as far as spending money on there hobbies, and i kinda agree to me that amount of money for just a guitar alone seems too much but im sure that they play amazingly and sound the same.

and yet i think of other people's hobbies and it would take them thousands just to get started.you would be lucky if most guitar players have spent more than 4k in the time they have been playing.

Be careful with sweeping generalizations like that. UG's only one site, and hardly a representative sample of all guitarists in the world. Remember that a disproportionate number of posters are younger, less experienced players who don't necessarily have the money -- or ear! -- for more expensive equipment.

I've probably spent about $2200 on my equipment, in two years of playing. (I should feel more self-conscious about posting that...) None of it was very expensive; I just have a lot of stuff. I'm a compulsive shopper -- if I see a guitar I like, I buy it. Sometimes I get good deals, but I've never been "ripped off"; the guitar's much more important to me than the money.

By the way, I'm just your stereotypical broke college student. But I live at home, have scholarships that pay me to attend, and am an absolute penny-pincher with anything that's not guitar-related. For example, I'm typing this on a 9-year-old computer I bought for $55 on eBay. Seriously.

Meanwhile, I'm in a band right now with a bunch of my professors -- long story -- and they probably spend more than $4k each per instrument. Believe me, there is quite a bit of difference between a $300 Seagull and a high-end custom Taylor. True, I doubt I could justify the price difference yet (anyway, I like having a guitar I don't feel guilty beating up), but for an experienced professional player, that level of quality is worth every cent.
#17
if i had the money at all, i'd justify $5500 on that madagascar rosewood eric clapton signature model in a heartbeat - THE best sounding guitar i've played in my life. and if i had more, i'd go with that goodall gc at mccabe's in heartbeat, and then one of the koa taylors. then i'd spend ALL my time playing in a haze of complete happiness

of course, i'd have to because i'd have just spent $11,900 plus tax on guitars *LOL*

btw, fretboard12, sent ya a pm about where you can find LOTS of guitarists who certainly aren't cheap OR broke
#18
Quote by fretboard12
guitarist are some of the cheapest people as far as spending money on there hobbies


haha i know thats not true... not to add up everything i've ever owned, but my guitars alone. RG570: $400. Seagull: $750. Warmoth Strat: $900+ total. MIM Tele: $800 or so. and i've got $500 in my checking account and i'm trying to figure out what amp i'm going to spend it on! i know plenty of people (on UG and otherwise) who save for a year or more just to buy one piece of equipment.
Warmoth Telecaster Deluxe. Warmoth Strat. Seagull Artist Portrait Acoustic.

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#19
lol hey everyone, you cant really say things you used to own because you sold it and got the money back for it or most of it. Still you really haven't went over 4k if even a little. And no imaginary money don't count and you might would change you mind if you had the cash ready to spend thinking ( i could buy this instead of that guitar.I can still use my old one)

views become different when cash is in your wallet.

even alot of the older generation player's majority of them probably don't own over that much in equipment. in fact probably less since they don't play in band's any more.

and when i say other hobbies were talking 10k think about wood working, hobbies like that. think of how much a guitar builder has in tools alone. that exceeds way beyond what most guitar players would own.
#20
all the ones i listed are guitars sitting in my room right now. and things you've owned in the past still definitely count! especially when you consider how little you can really get for things you try to sell after they're used.

but yeah, like i said i definitely won't go through all the things i've owned in the past haha thats a lot of stuff and more money than i'd like to think about... (my SG, my Les Paul, my Wolfgang Standard...)

anyway my point is i think guitarist spend the most money out of most instruments! besides the violinists who spend millions on one violin, obviously. but most people i know who play the trumpet don't get GAS for a new trumpet haha even though those band instruments are expensive i've still got them beat for sure. and acoustics are worth every penny if they sound or play great i think. electrics can often be upgraded, but acoustics have next to nothing to upgrade (bridge or saddle, tuners) and thats it.
Warmoth Telecaster Deluxe. Warmoth Strat. Seagull Artist Portrait Acoustic.

"Well good God damn and other such phrases, I haven't heard a beat like this in ages!"
-Dan Le Sac Vs The Scroobius Pip
#21
Quote by fretboard12
even alot of the older generation player's majority of them probably don't own over that much in equipment. in fact probably less since they don't play in band's any more.

Again, you're making sweeping generalizations without any evidence or justification...

Quote by fretboard12
and when i say other hobbies were talking 10k think about wood working, hobbies like that. think of how much a guitar builder has in tools alone. that exceeds way beyond what most guitar players would own.

Have you ever actually done woodworking? You can do quite a bit with just a couple saws, a plane, a mortiser, glue, sandpaper, and a few clamps. (When I saw "a few clamps," I really mean a lot. You can never have too many clamps.) You can always buy more expensive, specialized tools like lathes later. Yes, it can add up to quite a bit over time, but you don't need that much stuff to start.

I believe you can do a lot of luthierie work with ordinary woodworking tools, a steady hand, and a lot of time, but that's a bit beyond my expertise. You might want to ask GB&C.
#22
Quote by obeythepenguin
Again, you're making sweeping generalizations without any evidence or justification...


Have you ever actually done woodworking? You can do quite a bit with just a couple saws, a plane, a mortiser, glue, sandpaper, and a few clamps. (When I saw "a few clamps," I really mean a lot. You can never have too many clamps.) You can always buy more expensive, specialized tools like lathes later. Yes, it can add up to quite a bit over time, but you don't need that much stuff to start.

I believe you can do a lot of luthierie work with ordinary woodworking tools, a steady hand, and a lot of time, but that's a bit beyond my expertise. You might want to ask GB&C.



lol yea and i can chop down a tree with a pocket knife don't mean im going to.
in other words it makes the job more difficult.
#23
Quote by fretboard12
lol yea and i can chop down a tree with a pocket knife don't mean im going to.
in other words it makes the job more difficult.

I did that once. (It was a little tree, only about an inch around the trunk. But I seriously did use my pocketknife. Things are amazing, aren't they.)

Luthierie is tricky work, even with specialized tools -- I'll concede that. But for basic everyday woodworking, the ones I mentioned are more than enough. That's how my dad and I built most of the furniture in our house.

Please stop using analogies with subjects you don't understand.
#24
Quote by obeythepenguin
I did that once. (It was a little tree, only about an inch around the trunk. But I seriously did use my pocketknife. Things are amazing, aren't they.)


Please stop using analogies with subjects you don't understand.



yea and i could go to the moon with a step ladder if its long enough and a space suit. but let me guess,you done that too. O yea i don't know what im talking about because i don't work for NASA.
#25
I forgot what the original question was...but I am saving for the next 2 or 3 years to buy a really good guitar. I spent $200 on a Yamaha for now, and in the future it will be a Taylor or Martin, or whatever else I come across that I really like. I expect to spend $3000 to $5000. But, if I win the lottery it will be much, much, much more, and I will probably buy five.
#26
Quote by harryt62
I forgot what the original question was...but I am saving for the next 2 or 3 years to buy a really good guitar. I spent $200 on a Yamaha for now, and in the future it will be a Taylor or Martin, or whatever else I come across that I really like. I expect to spend $3000 to $5000. But, if I win the lottery it will be much, much, much more, and I will probably buy five.



yea its a little off topic but its all in fun.
#27
Quote by fretboard12
yea and i could go to the moon with a step ladder if its long enough and a space suit. but let me guess,you done that too. O yea i don't know what im talking about because i don't work for NASA.

Amidoinitrite?

@ harryt62: I think at one point there was some mention of string gauges.
#28
Space elevator

that's neat,



yea you don't work for NASA either
Last edited by fretboard12 at Nov 15, 2009,
#29


anyway, no reason for a big off-topic argument. yes, guitarists definitely do spend tons of money finding the right sound or the right gear. no, you shouldn't have intonation problems by just changing gauge with acoustic strings.
Warmoth Telecaster Deluxe. Warmoth Strat. Seagull Artist Portrait Acoustic.

"Well good God damn and other such phrases, I haven't heard a beat like this in ages!"
-Dan Le Sac Vs The Scroobius Pip
#30
bard edit:

Quote by LifeIsABullet16
anyway, no reason for a big dick-waving contest. yes, guitarists definitely do spend tons of money finding the right sound or the right gear. no, you shouldn't have intonation problems by just changing gauge with acoustic strings.


what he said.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
Last edited by roamingbard13 at Nov 15, 2009,
#31
lol im not gonna quote that photo, but good point.

well i found that my guitar had bronze 12s from factory and im thinking of going to 11s
hopefully with no intonation problem's. Any lower in gauge may be to thin sounding like they said earlier.
#32
Ehh... I think the questions have been sufficiently answered. Too much off topic posting.
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